Watch the Trailer for the New McQueen Documentary Premiering at TriBeCa This Weekend

 

When it comes to fashion, there’s only ever been one Alexander McQueen. His edgy, avant-garde looks and radical runway presentations throughout the ’90s and early-to-mid-’00s constantly pushed boundaries and reinvented shapes, catapulting the volatile young designer to infamy and accolades.

When he took his own life in 2010 at just 40-years-old, the fashion world was devastated by the loss of such an inimitable genius. And McQueen, the new documentary by Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui, will at last give genuine insight into his life and creative process.

 

 

Born in London, the designer graduated from Central Saint Martins before taking over the position of head designer at Givenchy and launching his eponymous brand. By the time he was in his thirties, he had won the “British Designer of the Year” award four different times. Beyond his innovative design approach, McQueen completely redefined fashion – and the fashion show – as we’d come to understand it. Whether he was recreating a shipwreck (S/S ’03), using models in a game of human chess (S/S ’05), or programming robots to spray-paint supermodel Shalom Harlow at the end of the runway (S/S ’99), he never saw fashion as just a way to make pretty clothes (though his designs were definitely so). For Alexander McQueen, everything was art.

In the film, Bonhôte and Ettedgui capture this through archival footage, never-before-seen photographs and interviews with the designer’s closest friends and family. Premiering this weekend at TriBeCa Film Festival, McQueen paints a powerful portrait of one of his generation’s most influential artists.

Watch the trailer, below.

 

 

Photos courtesy of ‘McQueen;’ Buy tickets here.

 

alexa BlackBook: Designs on Acting: ‘Hard Sun’ Star Agyness Deyn Talks Drama with Writer-Director Alex Ross Perry

 

IF you found the bleak dystopia of The Handmaid’s Tale terrifying, you’d better buckle up for Hard Sun. The sensational Hulu/BBC drama concerns a pair of British detectives who discover that the apocalypse is coming in five years — and that the government wants them dead for finding out.

Aside from providing cryptic conspiratorial thrills, the show boasts a riveting performance from lead Agyness Deyn as the intense Elaine Renko. The emotionally wounded deputy inspector is trying to save the world, resolve family trauma, and process a growing suspicion that her partner (Jim Sturgess) is corrupt.

A former model raised in Manchester, England, Deyn, 35, has proved to be a formidable actress with an excellent taste in film and television projects. The New Yorker named her one of the best actresses of 2016 for Sunset Song, the story of a young woman persevering through a brutal rural existence in World War I-era Scotland. It’s a long way from shooting ads for Dior, Burberry, Uniqlo and Vivienne Westwood and hanging out with creative collective the Misshapes (she’s been based in NYC since the early ’00s). Next, Deyn will co-star alongside “Handmaid’s Tale” actress Elisabeth Moss in “Her Smell,” an indie film about feuding female punk rockers by writer-director Alex Ross Perry.

Perry has made a name for himself as a sensitive and curious teller of women’s stories, via a quick succession of acclaimed, fantastically cast micro-indies: 2014’s nervous-novelist tale “Listen Up Philip” (with Moss and Jason Schwartzman), 2015’s deep dive into female friendship, “Queen of Earth” (Moss again), and 2017’s “Golden Exits” (with Chloë Sevigny, Schwartzman and former Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz).

Deyn and Perry convened a meeting of their mutual admiration society on an April Saturday in New York.

 

Khaite sweater, $1,150 at Saks Fifth Avenue, 611 Fifth Ave.; Pants, $690 at BodeNewYork.com; Earrings, $496 at SimonMillerUSA.com

Alex Ross Perry: Do you remember how we met?

Agyness Deyn: We met at — what’s that place called on St. Marks? It was Cafe Orlin! Wow, this might have been, like, four years ago. We ended up sitting down for about two hours chatting — drinking loads of tea. I thought it was just so fun. I remember when you spilled the tea — about the project you were working on, about stuff we were both working on, about life. The two hours went by and we were like, “S – – t, we’ve been sitting here for a long time.”

ARP: I remember feeling exceptionally encouraged and excited by it. The meeting was for a big movie that I was trying to make that never got made. But because I ended up having a lot of meetings, now I’ve essentially been able to cast anything I’ve made since then with people I [originally] wanted to put in that movie. The following spring, I saw Terence Davies’ “Sunset Song” and was completely blown away by your performance. What path did that character set you on?

AD: I think about Terence [Davies] regularly, probably weekly. I finished that film and thought, “Oh, I suppose that I am an actor now.” I said that to Terence, and he said, “Well, of course, you are.” I remember thinking someone believed in me a million times more than I believed in myself as an actor and as a woman. He gave me a huge responsibility to carry a film he’s been trying to make for 15 years. Making that film, I went from being a girl to a woman. His projection of what a woman is helped me embody what I had in myself.

 

Shirt, $435 at BodeNewYork.com; Pants, $400 at SimonMillerUSA.com

ARP: How did that change the bar you’ve now set for yourself?

AD: I knew that I wanted to play strong women with a point of view who have something to say. “Sunset Song” and “Hard Sun” are so different, but it was kind of a continuation. Elaine [in “Hard Sun”] is this damaged but strong and enigmatic woman who seems kind of genderless and walks to the beat of her own drum. I have a very English way of being apologetic. I didn’t have that kind of “F you” attitude, and [the director] drilled that out of me very quickly. It was fast-paced, the story matter was intense. It almost killed me, but it was exhilarating to play her.

ARP: I don’t know how long the shoot for “Sunset Song” was, but with [“Hard Sun”], suddenly you’re a sprinter who has to run a marathon without training for it. 

AD: Definitely. It was such a shock. I remember saying to Jim [co-star Sturgess] after we’d done the first two episodes, “We’ve got to do this again, haven’t we?” And he was like, “Yeah.” Like a marathon, you’re not sure how you’re going to save your energy and your feelings because you don’t know how much you’ll need at the end.

ARP: Now, you can’t just say yes to some TV show that won’t be satisfying.

AD: Exactly. I have the same sensation about the movie [“Her Smell”] you and I are doing together.

 

“Making that film, I went from being a girl to a woman … It almost killed me, but it was exhilarating to play her. ”

 

ARP: We’re not asking you to come in and be this mysterious, elfin, British model-type woman. There’s music lessons involved, there’s a certain theatricality involved. We’re setting up a series of extreme challenges. 

AD: I can’t wait. It’s funny because I know I’m so excited and so terrified before a job when I start dreaming about it. I woke up this morning after having a nightmare about actually being in the band: “Oh my God, oh s–t. I don’t know the song.”

ARP: The sort of all-encompassing logistical panic of this movie is something I’ve never really experienced. 

 

Rosie Assoulin overalls, $1,695 at ModaOperandi.com; Sweater, $325 at SimonMillerUSA.com 

AD: Where did you get the idea of making this film?

ARP: I wondered, what could I be doing that no one else would be doing right now? A lot of people can make something inspired by an era 50 years removed. Maybe I do a music movie about a disreputable genre no one’s really romanticizing in the same way yet. But it’s so much more about [the] identity of all these women in this movie — motherhood and sisterhood within these bands, and addictions and addictions to people. 

AD: I always say ’79 was such a great year for music in England, with the Clash and all these brilliant bands. It was amazing to be a young person and introduced to them by different friends. It shapes you as a person. So, it’s a fun way to explore it all again and also hear everyone else’s stories.

ARP: I’ve jokingly said this is a role you’ve been preparing to inhabit for your entire life, via modeling or acting. Maybe “mysterious, ethereal rock goddess” was a career path that may [have] eluded you, but now you get to use your lifetime’s worth of knowledge to be in this character.

AD: I remember seeing images early on of the Slits and the Raincoats — these young women just doing what they wanted. It was just so exhilarating to think like, “Oh, I can be that.”

 

 

ABOUT THE SPACE

We photographed Agyness Deyn at a lower-Manhattan pied-à-terre tucked inside the 1879-built Robbins & Appleton Building, with interiors designed by Mark Zeff. Commissioned by a Miami-based couple, the Bond Street residence showcases the duo’s diverse collection of special artworks by renowned creators such as Andy Warhol. The designer was charged with maintaining the raw loft’s distinct character while also creating intimacy for the couple and their teen children. Using ribbed glass and blackened steel, Zeff partitioned the 4,500 sqaure-foot space into wonderfully dramatic tableaus, including a glass-box study and an airy kitchen designed for entertaining.

 

 

On the cover: Blazer, $1,695, and pants, $1,295, both at RosieAssoulin.com; “Elsa” earrings, $740 at AgmesNYC.com

Photos by Martien Mulder; Styling by Danielle Nachimani, Hair by Seiji using Oribe Hair Care for The Wall Group; Beauty by Gianpaolo Ceciliato using Chanel Plaette Essentielle for Tracey Mattingly Agency; Bond Street Photo by Eric Laignel

 

Is it Fall Yet? Our Favorite NYFW Collections We Can’t Wait to Wear

Alexander Wang F/W ’18

 

Is it just us or is fall fashion just so much better than spring? That was definitely the case at the NYFW FW18 shows the past two weeks. And so while most New Yorkers might be pining for spring sunshine throughout this temperamental (but mostly cold) Northeast winter, we find ourselves counting down the days until September finally returns, and we can look cute again.

From Matrix-inspired office wear at Alexander Wang to ’80s power suits at Marc Jacobs and ’00s-era Paris Hilton puppy vibes at Gauntlett Cheng, we’ve compiled here our favorite Fashion Week moments – plus two honorable mentions because, well, we just couldn’t bear to narrow it down.

 

Alexander Wang

 

 

We’ve loved Alexander Wang since he first debuted his part minimalist, part rock ‘n’ roll It-girl uniforms; but we have to say, the last few seasons have left us with a never-ending #WANGOVER. This season, though, the San Fransisco born designer channeled The Matrix-meets-The Office, delivering a range of post-apocalyptic professional wear that we want every piece of – especially, the fur-lined ’90s CK-inspired undies.

 

Marc Jacobs

 

 

Marc Jacobs is basically the Alexander Wang of the late ’90s. So, needless to say, we’re giant fans. But much like last season’s awful #WANGOVER, Marc has fallen off a bit the last few years. I mean, remember the dreadlocks fiasco? Still, it seams Jacobs got the memo (or finally found it again), and this season felt like a return to form. Part ’80s power suit, part goth noir, the Marc Jacobs FW18 collection felt like Bianca Jagger in her white suit days, if she had Grace Jones’ attitude and Siouxsie’s sense of color. What more could you possibly as for?

 

Eckhaus Latta

 

 

One of fashion’s favorite new brands, Eckhaus Latta has mastered minimalism in its purest form. For their FW18 collection, designers Mike Eckhaus and Zoe Latta built upon the easy going feel of their last few seasons, but experimented more with shape and color than they ever have before. While the knits and sheer dresses fit right into the Eckhaus Latta playbook, bright yellow flowy fabrics were a new look for the brand. Overall, the collection was bold but understated, yet what Eckhaus Latta does best isn’t actually their clothes. Season after season, and despite its growing popularity, the brand remains dedicated to its outsider ethos. And did we mention their casting always rules? This season saw a diverse runway filled with New York City favorites, including model Paloma Elsesser and indie rock royalty Coco Gordon-Moore.

 

Tom Ford

 

 

Nobody does sleek and sexy like Tom Ford. This season, the designer went all in with leopard print, mixing loud colors with the even louder print in all different sizes from head-to-toe. Not only did each look feel totally timeless, you’ve got to give it to someone who can make lime green or bright red leopard print look not only classy, but cool.

 

Chromat

 

 

Another one of the fashion industry’s favorite young designers, Becca McCharen-Tran built Chromat to empower women of all shapes, sizes and colors. While most brands have embraced a long overdue push for diversity on the runway (not looking at you, Stefano Gabbana), Chromat also delivers it IRL. With a focus on emerging technology and body positivity, the label pushes boundaries and challenges the fashion status quo. For her latest collection, McCharen stuck with oranges and neons, accessorizing each look with Flaming Hot Cheeto bags tied to models’ pants and in their hands. Rapper Slay Rizz finished out the show with a killer performance in an orange two-piece by Chromat, and even though we didn’t get any cheese puffs to go, we were sold.

 

Dion Lee

 

 

Since launching his eponymous label in 2009, Australian designer Dion Lee has consistently delivered classic yet forward-thinking clothing, with his FW18 collection serving as further proof of his talent. Outfitting traditional sportswear looks with architectural bra-tops, it seems Lee also watched The Matrix and The Office before designing his collection. But unlike Wang’s, the Dion Lee range felt modern, not futuristic – the Neo influence was subtle. Lee also brought in more feminine elements, juxtaposing the structured suits and tops with flowy skirts.

 

Gypsy Sport

 

 

Ever since winning the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund in 2015, Rio Uribe has been making waves with his brand Gypsy Sport. Inspired by New York City, Uribe turned heads last year when he decided to present his Spring collection in Paris. But for FW18, Uribe returned to the city, thank god. Other than that, though, this was an all new Gypsy Sport. Over the last few years, the brand has become recognizable for their upcycled jerseys and I <3 NY logo tees, with the Gypsy Sport name in place of the heart. This season, Uribe ditched the streetwear element, presenting a romantic collection filled with suits and gothic ruffles, as well as a few sustainable aluminum looks. Of course, the designer stuck to his habit of using friends and members of the LGBTQ community as models, including 10-year-old activist and drag star Desmond is Amazing, who stole the show (and probably all of Fashion Week). Known for his willingness to experiment, it’s hard to tell whether this collection was a one-off, or the evolution of the brand. Either way, it doesn’t really matter, because whatever Gypsy Sport does is really, really good.

 

Adam Selman

 

 

Another CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund alum, Adam Selman won Fashion Week in our book. The FW18 collection was kinky, it was campy, it was part John Waters, part new wave, it was punk as fuck. Featuring a collaboration with artist Cheyco Leidmann, who created the surrealist prints Selman used on dresses and shirts, the range was bold and colorful, mixing prints, patterns and styles in an ode to photographer Ypsitylla Von Nazareth. In addition to the outfits, Selman also debuted his latest collection for sunglasses brand Le Specs. If you haven’t already been spotting his metallic cat-eyes for the last few years, get ready – this season’s heart-adorned versions are about to be everywhere. We want ours now.

 

Vaquera

 

 

Most people had never heard of New York City brand Vaquera before last NYFW, when they debuted a dress made only of blue and gold credit cards. For some reason, the look ended up on every news outlet, even though it was one of the weakest of the show. (We’re not saying we didn’t like it – we did.) What Vaquera does best is their more subtle work. This season, the designers seemed to realize that as well, presenting a range of deconstructed pieces that were delicate and cool. The highlights: an oversized blazer dress, cropped suit and crazy snakeskin skirt that all looked like they were slightly unfinished, but in reality, took forever to make. And isn’t that the best stuff anyway? The kind that costs, like, $10,000, but looks like you got it in the back of Duane Reade.

 

Calvin Klein

 

 

Oh, Raf. There’s literally nothing he could do at this point that would make us angry, because every collection he sends down the runway is as close to perfect as it gets. After presenting a men’s collection for his namesake label earlier in the week that revolved around Christiane F. and Cookie Mueller’s Drugs, Simons presented a classic Calvin Klein collection that took all of his quirky eccentricities and somehow made them look, well, classic as fuck. I mean, who else could send swimming caps and sweatshirt-less hoodies down the runway, without looking like he’s trying to be avant-garde? No one. And that’s part of his charm. Unlike a lot of of designers who, when they take over a storied brand, start to lose their individual voice, Raf’s seems to get only louder with each season, and we can’t wait to see what happens next.

 

Jeremy Scott

 

 

We have to be honest when we say that we love Moschino, but have never really caught the Jeremy Scott bug. That is, until this season, where Scott went full-on Fifth Element, with futuristic space-inspired looks. For those of you that don’t know, Jean Paul Gaultier did the costumes for The Fifth Element, and it’s basically a 2-hour fashion orgasm. So, when Scott sent Gigi Hadid down the runway in a silver overall dress, pink crop-top and matching pink LeeLoo-inspired wig – well, we almost stood up to give him immediate applause. The rest of the collection was equally amazing, with all of it feeling retro-futuristic without trying too hard. The key was nothing felt too much like a costume, just the uniform for a school in 2064.

 

Honorable Mentions

Telfar

 

 

This was Telfar Clemons’ second collection since winning the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, and though it was impeccable, it was the presentation that really kicked ass. Following the runway show that saw Clemons’ solidify his gender neutral ’70s aesthetic, singer/performer Dev Hynes, rapper Ian Isiah, Kelela, Oyinda, 070 Shake and Kelsey Lu took the stage for an intimate performance. The result was emotional yet understated, just like the collection itself.

 

Gauntlett Cheng

 

 

We’re big fans of Esther Gauntlett and Jenny Cheng’s self-aware brand that makes clothes for cool girls all over the world. This season, the duo went Westminster – or maybe Paris Hilton circa 2002. Either way, we were obsessed with the high fashion pieces they presented on models and a group of pups.

 

All photos courtesy of Vogue Runway

Shop the Vibrant and Iconic Lifestyles of Your Favorite ’80s Movie Starlets

Travel back in time and shop the trendsetting and iconic lifestyles of your favorite 1980s women on screen with help from our ebay collection.

Get Nastassja Kinski’s subtly sexy look from Paris, Texas with an deep pink oversized Angora sweater and tousled, voluminous locks. Go retro with a red rotary phone and Super 8mm camera to immerse yourself in the past.
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Take inspiration from Madonna’s trailblazing accessories style in Desperately Seeking Susan with chunky gold Christian Lacroix, Valentino, and Chanel jewelry paired with classic Wayfarers. Get really into the groove throw your favorite vintage Madonna on the record player.
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Spice up your summer look with inspiration from Melanie Griffith in Something Wild by donning a simple black Alexander Wang dress with vintage statement jewelry and colorful handmade African Bead Work bangles. Give your best shade with vintage square sunglasses in an array of eye-popping colors.
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Be ready for any occasion with Rosanna Arquette’s sweet and simply chic style from After Hours and dress yourself in a Marc Jacobs silk skirt and a Ferragamo buckle belt. Who needs a phone, when you’ve got a classic vintage pocket watch to help you beat the clock.

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Perfect Your Retro Beach Style By Shopping These Iconic Films From Our New ebay Collection

Shop our new ebay collection to score looks inspired by our favorite classic summer films with style worth emulating, and track down the very best bathing suits, sunglasses, posters, and soundtracks to truly immerse yourself in the world of these movies. Take a look, shop around, and get ready for summer.

 

SUN-DAPPLED FRENCH RIVIERA CHIC: Otto Premminger’s Bonjour Tristesse

Kick back on the beach in French Riviera Chic with tortoise shell cat eye shades, denim chambray  inspired Otto Preminger’s 1968 Cinemascope beauty.

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EFFORTLESS 1980s BEACH BABE: Eric Rohmer’s Pauline at the Beach

Slap on some Chanel shades and slip into a retro polka-dotted swimsuit to convey an effortless ’80s beach babe. 

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TOUSLED, BEACHSIDE BARDOT: Jean-Luc Godard’s Contempt

Serve your best Bardot in a vibrant, mod bikini with a matching beach towel to boot.

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KITSCHY SURF SIDE GLAMOUR: Robert Lee King’s Psycho Beach Party

Get kitschy with retro cat-eye shades and a vintage airbrushed surfboard.

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ROMANCE ON THE RUN CHIC: Jean-Luc Godard’s Pierrot Le Fou

A light, striped red dress and vintage spaghetti string tumblers will make you feel tres chic in the blistering summer heat. 

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SUN-KISSED SUMMER HOLIDAY STYLE: Eric Rohmer’s A Summer’s Tale

Bucket hats and simple swimwear are the perfect sun-kissed style to emulate this classic.

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RETRO PREPPY POISE: Anthony Minghella’s The Talented Mr. Ripley  

Get preppy at exclusive pool clubs this summer with vintage horn-rimmed glasses and white Ralph Lauren shorts.

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VINTAGE BEACHSIDE ELEGANCE: Fred Zinnemann’s From Here to Eternity

Convey elegance on stretches of white-sand beaches in a classic black halter swimsuit laying on a Pucci beach towel like Bert Lancaster, Deborah Kerr, and Sinatra…

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1960s NAUTICAL NOSTALGIA: René Clément’s Purple Noon

Stripes, texture and color pop for a nautical nostalgic look ​ from the devastatingly handsome Alain ​Delon. 

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SCHOOL’S OUT FOR SUMMER STYLE: MIKE NICHOL’S THE GRADUATE

Dustin Hoffman made Mrs. Robinson swoon in vintage shades and a ’60s swimsuit.

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Shine On: 24 Hours of Casual Bling

Edythe (Marilyn) wears a sequined tank top by H&M, jeans and sneakers by Acne. Photo by Rodolfo Martinez for BlackBook.

Just because the sun starts to set earlier now doesn’t mean the season has to take sequins down with it — in fact, we might all be better off with a little extra shine in its place. You might automatically think “evening” when spotting embroidered, beaded, or sequined pieces, but our favorite time to bust these items out is when it’s least expected — right smack in the middle of the day.

Ground those extra special pieces with über-comfy shapes like boyfriend jeans, sweatshirt silhouettes, and sneakers. It’s the ultimate relaxed glamour.

Click on the images below to see photos full screen

Edythe girls up Acne boyfriend jeans and a men’s tee with a fitted, embellished jacket by H&M.

A relaxed sweatshirt shape pairs beautifully with an embellished and ladylike pencil skirt. Both from H&M.

Photographer: Rodolfo Martinez
Fashion Editor: Alyssa Shapiro
Makeup: Ayindé Castro
Hair: Hikaru Hirano

Check out more of Rodolfo Martinez’s photos for BlackBook here.

Visual Xanax: Deshabille Wednesdays

It’s not really caring whether or not you’re fully clothed that makes all the difference in what you’re wearing. So carry onward… the week’s halfway over (then it’s back to duvet dressing.)

Image: Shalom Harlow for Helmut Lang fall winter 2001

Need another hit? Click here.

STYLE SCOOP: Anna Wintour Slums It, Katie Holmes Shutters, Kendall Jenner is Legit

Kendall Jenner has Marc Jacobs, Givenchy, and now Chanel under her belt. The moving-toward-bonafide runway model shopped the chic Chanel hypermarché for Karl Lagerfeld. Pick us up some oeufs while you’re out, won’t you?

Holmes and Yang, that label founded by Katie Holmes and her stylist, is supposedly no longer. The two reportedly disagreed on everything, making running a successful business technically impossible. Oh well. Will we miss it?

Anna Wintour sat second row at Valentino — quel horreur!! She may have switched seats with Vogue.com reviewer Sarah Mower, but still.

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