Watch Siskel & Ebert Fight Over Nickelodeon Film ‘Good Burger’

In case you haven’t had enough of Roger Ebert nostalgia, here’s a great clip from Siskel & Ebert and the Movies from 1997 in which the two critics go head-to-head during their review of Good Burger, the feature-film adaptation of the sketch from All That featuring Kel Mitchell and current SNL cast member Kenan Thompson. Both critics found the movie pretty stupid, as they should because they are adults, but it’s fascinating to watch the Siskel and Ebert actually come up with a reason to argue about the film’s merits—Siskel trashes it completely, whereas Ebert defends it on the grounds that it’s indended for an adolescent audience. 

[h/t Rob Scheer]

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Afternoon Links: IFC To Air 32 More Chapters of ‘Trapped in the Closet,’ January Jones Defends Betty

● Cancel all your plans: In addition to a third season of the beloved Portlandia, IFC has ordered 32 new chapters of R. Kelly’s ambitious musical series, Trapped in the Closet, all to be aired in the next year. [ArtsBeat]

● Clams Casino’s swelling remix of Florence + The Machine’s "Never Let Me Go" is almost as nice as this summer come early in New York. [GvsB]

● Gene Simmons promises "no fake bullshit" on the upcoming Kiss/Motley Crue tour. "Leave that to the Rihanna, Shmianna and anyone who ends their name with an ‘A,’" he says of his fellow stadium-fillers. Ouch! [Billboard]

● Kim Kardashian coolly explained to Ryan Seacrest yesterday that she couldn’t possibly be involved with Kanye West, romantically or otherwise, because, she says, “I think I’m still married." Enought already! [Radar]

● “I find myself defending her a lot more often, just because people are pretty hard on her lately,” says January Jones, a new mother herself, of her Mad Men character, Betty. "All of her actions are justified … And, you know, Sally shouldn’t be masturbating at other people’s houses or she’s going to get slapped." [The Daily]

● Slate’s got a lengthy but worthy excerpt of Enemies, A Love Story, a 25,000 word oral history of "the original frenemies" Siskel and Ebert that is hosted in full by The Chicagoan. [Slate]

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