Resurrection Summons Fashion Gods With New Retail Store

Photography: Alexander Thompson

In 1996, Mark Haddawy and Katy Rodriguez founded Resurrection, a retail archive that would become one the world’s premiere international venues for collectible and historic clothing. With locations in both Los Angeles and New York, Resurrection has attracted high fashion icons including Prince, Catherine Denueve, Lou Lou De la Falaise, Azzedine Alaia, Iman, John Galliano and Chloe Sevigny—not to mention Kate Moss, who Rodriguez cites as their longest running, most loyal client.

“Kate Moss came into the store on our first day 20 years ago,” she said. “She will always hold a special place in our hearts and history.  She embodies our generation’s curious take of high and low fashion and everything in between.”

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Alexander McQueen Dogtooth Cocoon Coat (2009), Alexander McQueen Sarabande Lace Gown (2007), Alexander McQueen Runway Gown (2008)

With a new location on Great Jones, Resurrection opens its doors to celebrate a brand new, custom retail gallery and archive. In addition to their vast inventory of vintage pieces from fashion gods like Christian Lacroix, Gaultier and Moschino, Haddawy and Rodriguez are celebrating three specific archive collections in their new space.

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It begins with a selection of rare 20th century, out-of-print books showcased on custom Brian Thoreen brass shelves, moves on to Bulgari Jewelry (including the company’s famous Tubas watches) and finishes with a pupil dilating curation of Alexander McQueen pieces.

“It’s really special,” Rodriguez said. “The collection spans McQueen’s career from our perspective. We love the early pieces as much as the very famous later collections. He was such a unique force.  It’s been an important reminder of what great is.”

Later this month, Resurrection will showcase a rare collection of Maison Martin Margiela and in September, will debut a Helmut Lang show—stay tuned.


Resurrection, 45 Great Jones Street, is open Monday – Saturday from 11 AM – 7 PM.

Industry Insiders: Stacey “StaceyPants” Bendet

Stacey Bendet Eisner is a woman of her own design. Deciding to forgo the Wall Street path early on, she entered the fashion world, becoming her own CEO, and after blazing the way for super original multi-colored jeans, earned her “StaceyPants” nickname. A mother to Eloise, wife to producer Eric Eisner, and often times a convivial hostess, the pint-sized powerhouse designer behind Alice + Olivia makes her work part of her life, and her life part of her work. Here she talks about her new ventures, her bi-coastal tendencies, and her love of Big Macs.

What are you doing in LA right now? Well, I’m out here the last week of each month. We have two shops here. We just opened a store out in Malibu but right now I’m actually on my way over to my store on Robertson.

You seem to juggle your public life with your family life. How are you able to multitask? Well, I think that my work is part of my life and my life is part of my work. It all goes together. Definitely having a husband and a baby you have to make some effort to balance things, but we do the last week of each month and then in New York for three weeks. Just kind of makes it work.

Does the whole family travel together? My husband actually produces and finances films so he likes to be out here more.

Alice + Olivia has been expanding. What’s in store for the future? We just opened a Malibu store. We have one of the biggest programs expanding for the next fall with 9T, our T-shirt collection. It includes all kinds of cool T-shirts at a little bit of a lower price point than some of our other stuff. Given the economy right now, it seems to be working really well. They are embellished, really detailed with lace or crystals or embroidery design. Some of them have necklaces attached. It’s more of a T-shirt you’d wear at night, not a shirt you’d throw on at the gym. We are also doing jewelry collaboration with Erickson Beamon, which will come out probably in November. We are discussing doing a possible makeup line that is not totally solidified yet but it’s something we are discussing.

What is the Alice + Olivia face? What would be the makeup aesthetic? It would be kind of signature Alice + Olivia, lots of blacks and whites. Black eyeliners, white sparkling eye shadows, and then pops of color like neon nail polish.

Aside from putting a face on the Alice + Olivia girl, what kind of girl wears the clothes? I think the Alice + Olivia girl is kind of that cool girl anywhere from 18-40 that likes to mix and match her outfits. And it could be anyone from the girl hanging out on the Lower East Side in one of our crazy dresses over a pair of jeans, to the more uptown girl who is going for lunch. Diversity is one of the things I focus on when designing a line. I like my pieces to be able to be worn by a wide range of people.

What are some of your favorite pieces? Right now I like all our new pants. We did all the genie pants and cargo pants for Spring that I really like.

What are some of your biggest goals for your brand in the next year? I think for the next year it’s just to keep the business clean, efficient, and leaner, because of everything that’s going on in the economy.

How do you feel the economy is affecting your own company? It’s been a wake up call. We were a little bit more lax about things, and now we are very much about being lean and efficient. We re-staffed and restructured in a way that is a little bit more reserved.

Is this affecting the materials you use or what you design? We’ve made an effort to have products that are at a low price point. I won’t compromise the quality of my fabrics or the garment for anything. I’ve tried to take a lower margin on some things so we can have a better price.

Many are mourning the death of their closets thanks to this recession. Can you give some advice on how to look great on a budget? I think it’s about keeping your wardrobe based around basics, and allowing yourself to buy statement pieces, like a great colorful bag or one awesome dress. Try to focus on things you can wear different ways. That’s why I love our t-shirts, because you can dress them up or down.

What inspires you? I think you’re inspired everyday of your life, and if you’re not you shouldn’t be a designer.

How would you describe your lifestyle right now if you were in work mode? I practice yoga everyday. My life is a little bit crazy and a little bit random. I’m kind of impulsive.

What about the way you design-what’s the creative process like? A little bit random too. We have certain things that we have to finish at certain times. Alive + Olivia is very much a collection of items, rather than putting out seasonal collections. We are making hundreds of things each month. The creative process builds off itself each day.

What are some of your favorite places to shop? Random vintage stores. The Way We Wore, Decades, Resurrection, Frock, Opening Ceremony, and Iris.

Where do you go out to these days? In LA we usually are pretty mellow. We love Il Sole, or Hamasaku for sushi. We have drinks with friends at the Chateau Marmont In New York we usually go to Rose Bar for drinks and we have dinners at Nobu, Waverly, Monkey Bar. I am always up for drunken bingo at Tortilla Flats.

What’s the best meal you’ve eaten in New York? I love Blossom for vegetarian and vegan food, I love Sushi Sen-Nin on 33rd street. Best meal? McDonalds. Nothing really beats a Big Mac and a strawberry milk shake. Definitely McDonalds.

Vintage 101: New York’s Best Pre-Owned Clothes

imageWe all want to be resourceful when it comes to spending money these days — while still satiating our unwavering desire for fashion. So what is a self-proclaimed fashionista/recessionista to do? About two years ago, I discovered the intoxicating world of vintage shopping. I was a little fatigued by the endless barrage of trends and quite honestly just wanted to set my style apart. If you’re savvy enough, the somewhat underground world of vintage will not only further your pursuit of personalized style; it will also accommodate your newfound fervor for saving. I’m passionate about so many of the vintage treasures that New York City has to offer, but to get you in the vintage mood, here are five in particular that will inspire you to further explore this fabulous alternative world.

First on my list is always Edith Machinist on the LES. I love the industrial name, as it’s a complete juxtaposition to the actual product in the store. It’s also a great place to find romantic, feminine dresses. I bought the most wonderful dress from the 1940s for about $150 — one of those special pieces that always looks fresh. Also, the owner is probably the most astute vintage belt and vintage boot connoisseur in the city. The selection is vast and weighted towards 60s- and 80s-inspired designs.

The next stop should always be Marmalade, also on the LES. Marmalade has been a mainstay on Ludlow Street for years and can be a bit daunting to vintage newbies, as most of the pieces need a little nip/tuck, and the styles are print/pattern-heavy. That said, if you have a great eye, you can really explore your inner Carrie Bradshaw. I absolutely love this store for that unique find!

Eleven in Nolita has perhaps the most distinct vintage point of view; they tend to focus on what I call “themed vintage.” Most of their covetable pieces are truly special and inspired by either Victorian, military, or western uniforms. They cater to both women and men. For the girls, the Belle Epoque-influenced jackets and blouses are to die for, and for the guys, they have the broadest old-school flannel shirt selection in the city.

Next on my list is What Comes Around Goes Around in Soho. It is by far one of my favorite outposts for downtown cool fashion. The men’s side of the store is the most visually intriguing of the Vintage 101 set and houses some of the best T-shirts and belts in New York. They also have an incomparable selection of vintage Levis … I still love a man in a great beat-up pair of 501s. The women’s side moves us into the vintage couture world, with some of the finest YSL and Courreges, but also caters to our newfound bargain-hunter mentality, with a plethora of girly finds under $200.

Lastly I would be remiss if I didn’t mention Resurrection in Nolita. This store is hands down the best for vintage couture, with everything from Chanel to Gucci to YSL. The prices are definitely up there, but the clothes are high on every fashionista’s want list. I’m a big believer in timeless style, so if you can splurge once in a while, this is the place to do it.

One-Day Tour: West Hollywood

imageWelcome to the gayborhood. Known as one of the most notable gay villages in the country, WeHo is also home to some of the best bars, restaurants, and shopping in all of Los Angeles. The vibe is friendly and the streets are walkable — this is one spot in LA where you can get all you need within a few blocks. The 90069 is filled with hot young things walking their dogs — due in part to the tight rent control in this area (cheap rent!) and the extremely dog-friendly landlords. For the first-time visitor, here’s your primer.

Stay: Chateau Marmont This beautiful, strange, matchless castle on the hill pulls stars for private bungalow overnights and rock-star debauchery. This is the spot to work your kinks out: relax, get wild, hide out, get noticed, anything goes. With all this rock n’ roll wrapped neatly in luxury linens, you may never leave the grounds. You should. But you might not.

10 a.m. Breakfast at Hugo’s. There’s a good chance you’ll sip coffee next to the latest hip producer/director/actor/creative in Hollywood. One of the top spots for power breakfasting in LA. Try the pasta Mama, it’s award-winningly delicious. Tea-lovers: You’ll be delighted to browse the several pages of offerings.

11:30 a.m. Head over to the Pacific Design Center. Browse the 130 design showrooms and the latest offerings from MOCA. Admire the oversized art surrounding the way-modern building.

1:30 p.m. Stop by Ariya and fill up on sushi. Sit in the covered back patio, and definitely order the OMG roll — it lives up to the name.

3 p.m. Put your chucks on and get ready to shop. First stop, Book Soup. This funky labyrinth of books is littered with staff recommendations and rocks an authentic creaky wooden floor. Once you’ve had your fill of the written word, pop over to Fred Segal. Trendsetters rule the roost here. The shopgirls are likely too cool for you, but admire the goods anyway. Next up, Resurrection: Vintage gowns, swoon. In case vintage isn’t your thing, check out A Bathing Ape down the street — hip hop sneakers on a conveyor belt. Then stroll over to Kidrobot and pick up the latest in limited-edition art-tastic “toys.” Whatever happens, make sure you end up at Wasteland, a Melrose institution, filled with the best vintage clothes in the city.

7 p.m. Go see the latest film at The Arclight (you are in LA for fck’s sake). See our list of the top theaters in Los Angeles.

9:30 p.m. Dinner at Comme Ca. Unpretentious French bistro. Try the steak frites and the risotto.

11:30 p.m. Roll out. Have a beer at Barney’s — and don’t be skerred if someone gets loud; the Bean has a penchant for lite bar fights. Wanna chill? Head to Bar Lubitsch, the red Russian lounge with top-shelf vodkas. Wanna people-watch? Head to The Abbey — the hottest cruising spot in town, boys who like boys who like girls who like girls, it’s all here. Wanna dance? Head to Area, of The Hills fame. Bottles, tables, dancing, preferably all three at the same time.

Bonus Round: • In town on a Sunday? Check out the Fairfax Flea Market, it’s a sure bet for funky jewelry, boho dresses, and other awesomeness. • Up late night, err, early morning? Irv’s Burgers opens at 8 a.m.