‘Prince: Live on the Big Screen’ Announced Two Years After His Death

 

Nearly two years after his shocking death on April 21, 2016, a live concert event will take place in Prince’s hometown of Minneapolis, accompanied by a new concert film titled Prince: Live on the Big Screen.

It will feature previously unreleased Prince footage, both audio and video, as well as onstage musical accompaniment from some of his favorite collaborators throughout his career. According to the Paisley Park estate, which is putting on the show, “very special guests” will contribute to the performance.

It all takes place at the Target Center, and is part of a four-day-long event, Celebration 2018, being put on by the estate. Tickets go on sale this Saturday, January 20.

Since his untimely death, interest in Prince’s music has only escalated. His estate donated memorabilia to an exhibition in London that took place last October, and a photo book, Prince: A Private View, was published the same month. In September, the concert film Sign O’ The Times aired in the U.S. on Showtime.

Pantone Is Making A Special Shade of Purple Inspired By Prince

In celebration and memorian of the great artist and icon Prince, who passed away last year, Pantone has announced the creation of a new shade of purple paint in partnership with the musician’s estate.

The color draws influence from Prince’s famous purple Yamaha piano and his song “Purple Rain.” The shade is called “Love Symbol #2.” And here it is:

Courtesy of Pantone. 

In Fashionista’s report, Pantone VP Laurie Pressman said: “We are honored to have worked on the development of ‘Love Symbol #2,’ a distinctive new purple shade created in memory of Prince, ‘the purple one.’ A musical icon known for his artistic brilliance, ‘Love Symbol #2’ is emblematic of Prince’s distinctive style. Long associated with the purple family, ‘Love Symbol #2’ enables Prince’s unique purple shade to be consistently replicated and maintain the same iconic status as the man himself.”

The shade is to be used as the “official color across the brand he left behind,” according to a press release.

Take a look at Prince performing “Purple Rain” during a rainstorm at the Super Bowl below:

Prince’s Family Is Trying To Make A Reality Show About Themselves

After Prince’s family went to court to stop the release of a posthumous EP on the anniversary of the late singer’s death, it’s been unearthed that his relatives are attempting to make a reality show about their live post-Prince passing, TMZ reports. Because we’re all waiting with bated breath to listen to millionaires talk about how hard their lives are.

Deliverance was supposed to come out April 21, but producer George Ian Boxill was stopped from releasing ten new Prince songs bt the artist’s family, who want to instead release the music on their alleged new TV show.

A judge has ruled that Boxill most overturn the new music to Prince’s kin, though the producer is still currently fighting it. Though the good news is, one way or another, we should be hearing these new songs at least someday.

While we wait on new music from our savior, let us reflect on simpler times by watching Prince’s Super Bowl Halftime Show:

Prince’s Streaming Numbers Up 6,323% Following Wide Release

After Prince’s music became available on Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music, and iHeartRadio on Sunday, the icon’s streaming numbers jumped 6,323%, Billboard reports. Prior to February 12, Prince’s music was only available for streaming on Tidal, which proves that most of are too cheap to buy Tidal but really want to listen to “Raspberry Beret” on repeat.

Prince’s top streamed songs? In order: “Purple Rain,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” “When Doves Cry,” “Little Red Corvette,” and “Kiss.”

To celebrate the artist’s posthumous prosperity, we’ve decided to gift you with his iconic 2007 Super Bowl performance of “Purple Rain” during a real-life rainstorm. Enjoy.

Protégé Judith Hill Reveals Details About Prince’s Emergency Illinois Landing

Judith Hill (via The Current)

Just six days before Prince died from an accidental opioid overdose, the musician’s protégé Judith Hill was aboard that infamous April 15 flight from Orlando, which ended in an emergency Illinois landing. She’s now detailed the fateful experience in an exclusive New York Times interview, recalling some of her final, painful memories with the late “Purple Rain” icon.

Sitting together on the plane, the two were sharing dinner before Prince suddenly fell unconscious. “His eyes fixed,” she told the NYT, before passing out completely. “I thought he was gone,” she admitted, revealing they didn’t have anything on the plane to help him back to consciousness. By the time they’d landed, however, Prince had woken up and received a shot of Narcan in an emergency ambulance. He was “very cooperative that whole night,” Hill said.

While under medical treatment in Moline, Illinois, Hill said it was the first time she’d ever seen Prince look vulnerable. He was reflecting on his unconscious experience in the hospital bed, saying he had to “fight for his life” in order to “get back into his body.” He remembered hearing distance demands urging him to “follow the voices,” calling the entire situation “the hardest thing he’d ever done.”

Hill, who was slated to be a back-up vocalist on Michael Jackson’s This is It tour and appeared on the 2013 season of The Voice, was Prince’s longtime friend and frequent collaborator. “There was a very intense relationship,” she told the NYT about her connection with Prince. “He told me that he loved me and that he would always be there for me.”

Read the full New York Times article, here.

HAIM Covers a Prince Classic, Debuts New Material at California Tour Kick-Off

Photo via Instagram

After announcing their return to music in late March, sister trio HAIM kicked off their summer tour Tuesday night in Santa Ana, California at The Observatory. With it came fresh, new material and a spot-on cover of Prince’s 1984 classic, “I Would Die 4 U.” Though sonically HAIM’s version didn’t stray too far from the original, the group closed with some in-synch, tongue-in-cheek choreography, which, of course, made the crowd go wild—us, too.

During the set, HAIM teased their forthcoming sophomore album with two never-before-heard songs—one called, “Give Me Just a Little of Your Love,” and the other titled, “Nothing’s Wrong.” Both have already garnered comparisons to Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, as well as ’80s Fleetwood Mac, which doesn’t sound too alien in comparison to their summer-pop breakout LP Days Are Gone.

Resurrection Summons Fashion Gods With New Retail Store

Photography: Alexander Thompson

In 1996, Mark Haddawy and Katy Rodriguez founded Resurrection, a retail archive that would become one the world’s premiere international venues for collectible and historic clothing. With locations in both Los Angeles and New York, Resurrection has attracted high fashion icons including Prince, Catherine Denueve, Lou Lou De la Falaise, Azzedine Alaia, Iman, John Galliano and Chloe Sevigny—not to mention Kate Moss, who Rodriguez cites as their longest running, most loyal client.

“Kate Moss came into the store on our first day 20 years ago,” she said. “She will always hold a special place in our hearts and history.  She embodies our generation’s curious take of high and low fashion and everything in between.”

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Alexander McQueen Dogtooth Cocoon Coat (2009), Alexander McQueen Sarabande Lace Gown (2007), Alexander McQueen Runway Gown (2008)

With a new location on Great Jones, Resurrection opens its doors to celebrate a brand new, custom retail gallery and archive. In addition to their vast inventory of vintage pieces from fashion gods like Christian Lacroix, Gaultier and Moschino, Haddawy and Rodriguez are celebrating three specific archive collections in their new space.

Resurrection_BOOKS_1F-3

It begins with a selection of rare 20th century, out-of-print books showcased on custom Brian Thoreen brass shelves, moves on to Bulgari Jewelry (including the company’s famous Tubas watches) and finishes with a pupil dilating curation of Alexander McQueen pieces.

“It’s really special,” Rodriguez said. “The collection spans McQueen’s career from our perspective. We love the early pieces as much as the very famous later collections. He was such a unique force.  It’s been an important reminder of what great is.”

Later this month, Resurrection will showcase a rare collection of Maison Martin Margiela and in September, will debut a Helmut Lang show—stay tuned.


Resurrection, 45 Great Jones Street, is open Monday – Saturday from 11 AM – 7 PM.

Stream Hours of Unreleased Prince Demos and Bootlegs

[Update: The mix has since been removed, but allow us to recommend this woozy “Adore” cover by Seiho and ehiorobo]

Rumors alleging 57-year-old Prince worked 154 hours straight prior to his death come as no real surprise, considering the purple-clad icon spent his career obsessively making music and archiving the unreleased magic in Paisley Park’s basement.

“It’s an actual bank vault, with a thick door,” Prince’s former sound engineer told The Guardian. “It’s in the basement of Paisley Park. When I left in 87, it was nearly full. Row after row of everything we’d done. I can’t imagine what they’ve done since then.”

Though it’s nearly impossible to find Prince’s music floating around online today because of his strict publishing, an anonymous Soundcloud user has pieced together a two-hour mix of unreleased demos and bootlegs from a “bottomless pit” of found tracks.

The compilation opens with “Extraloveable,” which Prince originally recorded in 1982 for his electro-pop trio Vanity 6, as well as a lo-fi version of Graffiti Bridge‘s “Tick, Tick, Bang,” which samples Jimi Hendrix.

Sandra Bernhard On Her NY Shows This Week, Happiness, & Her Legacy

Sandra Bernhard will perform tonight at Carnegie Hall at a fundraiser to raise money for music education programs for underprivileged kids. The Music of Prince show produced by Michael Dorf has Elvis Costello, D’Angelo, Talib Kwell, Bettye Lavette, Amos Lee, Devotcka, and many others performing Prince hits. The Roots are the house band. And on Saturday, Sandra will appear at the Tarrytown Music Hall in the namesake NY suburb. This is part of her national tour which will take her through the summer. Sandra was the go-to gal for me when I opened two clubs back in the day, She wowed them on New Year’s Eve a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away with an all-star cast that she assembled when the Palladium entrusted me to fill it. She also set the tone for me at Life when I first launched that fabulously famous joint. In both cases, I enjoyed the consummate professional who wowed us off and on the stage. This week, I caught up with Sandra and asked her all about it.

First of all, let’s begin where we first met. I booked you two times when I was running nightclubs. I booked you at the Palladium for New Year’s Eve, which was an amazing show. And then I booked you at the opening, or right after the opening at Life, a nightclub I ran on Bleecker street. 
Yeah! 
You were incredible. The first one was you, and you brought along Gianni Versace, Robin Byrd,  André Leon Talley, and there was one other..
It was Donatella Versace.

And we had Debbie Harry open, or after you performed because that’s the way it works. And the Psychedelic Furs performed for the first time in 10 years, and we had PM Dawn perform at dawn. 
Oh my God. 

So it was the biggest booking I think I ever did. 
Those days are gone. And sadly, cause I miss The Palladium. It was a great club. 

 
So you’re playing in Tarrytown this Saturday. Is the show the exact show that you’d do in Vegas or New York, or do you tone it down a bit for the local hoi polloi ?
I might just pull it back a bit, because you’re not gonna do a New York-style show in a place that doesn’t call for it. So in the sense of bringing all my wardrobe? No, I’m not gonna do that. But, I’ll be there with my band! We’ll have a great show. Apparently, a lot of NYers have moved to Tarrytown, as with all the surrounding areas of NYC, so you’re always gonna get a good audience wherever you are.

Tonight you’re playing with Elvis Costello, who’s amazing, at The Music of Prince at Carnegie Hall. What is the music of Prince? 
It’s a fundraiser for music education and it’s like 20 different people covering Prince songs. I’m covering “Little Red Corvette” with the band The Roots. You know, Questlove, it’s his band that’s the backup band. And other people are bringing their own bands, but I’m performing with Questlove. They’re backing me up.

You’re right in the forefront of the movement for LGBT rights. Under this administration, there seems to be exponential strides. Even Dirty Harry himself, Clint Eastwood, came out for gay marriage. Are you running out of material? 
That was never my thrust, the gay movement per se. That was certainly the backdrop, because that’s just sort of where the smart, forward-thinking people have always existed, and still do to a certain extent. But my material is much more eclectic than that and always has been. I mean, I never identified myself as, you know, a “gay performer." That’s just not where I’m at. My work is about taking all the things that I thought were sophisticated and important from all the different worlds. From the art world, from the music scene, the underground scene, from vaudeville, to Broadway, to rock ‘n’ roll, to burlesque, to the Black movement. I’ve always melded my shows together. I’m postmodern, honey. I don’t get caught up in one thing. Never have. 

I booked you back in the day because you know how to make a statement. 
And that’s what I’m still doin, honey, cause there’s plenty to make statements about. Now the statement is: how complacent can our culture be? How lazy can we be? How dependent are we on social media? And the lack of people putting themselves out there, meeting new people face-to-face, being inspired, which is the real human experience! That’s what makes people great and interesting. You can’t do that by hiding behind the veils of social media. I mean, it just cuts off people’s ability to grow as people. 

You have this band called The Flawless Zircons, which I think is an amazing name. Tell me about them.

Well, some of the stuff I’ve written and some of the songs are covers. I have a huge musical repertoire that I draw from depending on the night. I switch it up. I love that element of surprise, just the way I’m sure if you talked to The Stones the night before they did a set, they wouldn’t tell you their set-list  Nobody wants to hear ahead of time what they’re gonna be hearing, you know what I mean? And the name – I love to “wow” you with "the big rock" and it turns out to be diamond-wannabee Zirconia. It just makes me laugh.

You do so many things in your career, but what would you like to be remembered as? What is Sandra Bernhard’s legacy? 
As somebody who constantly breaks down the walls of complacency. I love being somebody who can command attention on stage. Who demands attention. Who earns attention. Is somebody who not only entertains you, but makes you walk away at the end of the night and think, “wow, here’s somebody who shares my emotions, my fears, my hopes." There’s a wave that carries us through life, and throws us on to lots of different shores of interesting, exciting, ongoing, inspiring circumstances. But life should always be inspiring. It shouldn’t suddenly drop off the cliff and not be fun anymore, no matter where we’re at culturally or environmentally. We still gotta find ways of making life inspiring. 

How far is the real Sandra Bernhard from the stage Sandra Bernhard? Are you always on? Is it always you? 
No, not at all. I think I can drop into entertaining mode at the drop of a hat. But day-to-day, it’s work! You gotta roll up your sleeves, deal with so many different elements of this business. I’m on both sides of the live-performing and the creative side, and I’m also on the acting side. You can’t just throw it into somebody else’s lap because it’ll just fall apart. At different junctures, I’ve been with the wrong people, and you just gotta wrestle back control of your career, and be collaborative with people. 

Are you happy, or happier?
I’ve always enjoyed my life. As an artist and creative person, you’re always struggling to find level footing because you see things other people don’t see. If you didn’t see them, you would have nothing to talk about. You may lift up corners of rugs that are filthy, and no one wants to look at the filth, but if you don’t look at the filth then you’ve got nothing to talk about. So, when you look at things that are a little shocking or a little scary, they affect you emotionally and physically. That’s what artists do – painters, sculptors, writers, singers, funny people –  we look at things that other people aren’t willing to look at, and then talk about it in a funny or interesting creative way. 
 
So what’s the future? What comes next? 
Right now, a friend of mine is developing a great television series idea for me and another actress I don’t want to talk about because we’re right in the planning stages. We’re setting up meetings to go out and pitch the idea, and there’s nothing more irritating than when things are in transition. You just gotta let them fall together. But it’s a great idea with another fabulous, highly-visible actress who needs to be seen again, so it’s the two of us. I feel very positive about it, and that’s my next thing that I really wanna get done. 
I remember when you came in for sound check at Palladium, I hadn’t yet met you, and people were saying, " Oh my God, she’s gonna eat you up, and don’t do this…and that…" Then we heard you walk in, and from then on, you were just a joy. You were a joy to work with. So professional.
Thank you, and that’s what you gotta be. I mean, there’s no excuse for being anything less, and there’s no reason not to be. If you’re not professional, you don’t get anything done. You know that, and I know that. And thank you for that gig! It was a great, great night. That was the most fun night. 
 
Transcribed by BlackBook’s superstar intern Nicole Pinhas.