Lexus Debuts Their New UX Luxury Compact Crossover with Bold Art Installation in NYC

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On any given night in New York City there are probably a million events happening, only a few of which are actually cool. So, you know if we’re going to actually leave the house, it has to be worth it — and on Tuesday night, it was.

To kick off the annual New York International Auto Show, Lexus threw a banger, and debuted their new UX compact luxury crossover. And you know, because all the best parties also include a really great collab, the brand teamed up with NYC non-profit RxArt to premiere a custom urban-landscape art installation by artist Daniel Heidkamp, which will later be placed in a New York City Pediatric Cancer Center. The piece was a life-size Manhattan skyline in bold neon Pop Art colors — the perfect backdrop for Lexus’  chic new ride.

 

 

Of course, they also gave us tote bags. But don’t worry, you can get one, too — we don’t want you to feel left out. It’s not as great as the Lexus UX, which is not only the brand’s first luxury compact crossover, but also introduces an “all new platform built for exceptional handling, an ultra-efficient powertrain and innovative luxury features,” made for young, cool, city-slickers just like you. And hey, if the L train’s going to close next year, what better option is there?

The Lexus UX (in hybrid and gas models) arrives in December 2018.

Photos by Daniel Byrne

 

10 Artists You Have To See At This Year’s Armory Show

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Nam June Paik, ‘Megatron Matrix’, photo courtesy of Ryan Somma

 

The Armory is basically the Coachella of the art world – well, sans the ecstasy and the floral headbands. But anyone who’s anyone (or has ever been at some point in time) will gather at Piers 92 and 94 in Manhattan to browse New York’s largest art fair and see work from both emerging and legendary global artists.

Since that can be a bit overwhelming, we’ve done you a solid and put together a list of 10 artists you won’t want to miss at this year’s show. Trust us.

 

Douglas Coupland at Daniel Faria

 

‘Tsunami Chest,’ 2017, photo courtesy of Daniel Faria Gallery

 

Postmodern artist and fiction author Douglas Coupland is known for subverting pop culture and military imagery, in part due to his time growing up in a military family throughout the Cold War. Fascinated by Andy Warhol and the whole Pop Art movement, Coupland explores the darker side of popular culture through installation and sculpture.

Gilbert & George at Ropac

 

‘Beardache,’ 2016, photo courtesy of the artist

 

Collaborative art duo Gilbert & George are known for their highly formalized performance art practice, as well as their, um, not so formal photography work. Their ongoing photo series, referred to as The Pictures, features large scale back-lit images of everything from skinheads to semen, and a whole lot of beards.

 

Kyle Meyer at Yossi Milo

 

From ‘Interwoven,’ 2017, photo courtesy of the artist

 

Kyle Meyer is a photographer, sculptor and mixed media artist who uses digital photography and a variety of handmade techniques, such as weaving, to explore connectivity in the digital age. For his series, Interwoven, Meyer hand-wove over photographs to celebrate flamboyance, homosexuality and femme-identifying men in a hyper-masculine culture.

 

Cammie Staros at Shulamit Nazarian

 

‘All Quiver and Shake,’ 2017, photo courtesy of the artist

 

Sculptor Camme Staros creates handmade objects that juxtapose modernism with antiquity and craft. Joining traditional materials like clay and ceramics with modern details like neon and steel, Staros examines the “semiotic systems” that have been “created and reinforced throughout art history.”

 

Etel Adnan at Gallery Continua

 

‘Five Senses for One Death,’ 1969, photo courtesy of the artist

 

Lebanese-American poet, writer and painter Etel Adnan crafts abstract oil paintings and landscapes inspired by Japanese leporellos that extend into space “like free-hand drawings.” In 2014, Adnan’s work was also included in the Whitney Biennial.

 

Nam June Paik at Gagosian

 

‘Lion,’ 2005, photo courtesy of Gagosian

 

Probably the most exciting artist on this list (at least for us), Nam June Paik is credited with being the founder of video art. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Paik began his career as a musician as part of the Fluxus movement in 1960. After moving to New York in 1964, he began experimenting with film, combining his musical works with video sculptures constructed of wire and metal. Before his death in 2006, Paik was known as an early adopter of technology, including his famous robots built of out multiple computers. In fact, he’s also credited with using the term “electronic super highway” as early as 1974. Damn.

 

Alicja Kwade at i8 Gallery

 

‘Computer (Power Mac),’ 2017, photo courtesy of i8 Gallery

 

Polish artist Alicja Kwade works in sculpture, installation, photography and film. Throughout all of her work, however, she likes to play with value systems, transforming useless materials like wood or glass into high value pieces of art.

 

Jinshi Zhu at Pearl Lam

 

‘A Tiger Shaped Tally,’ 2016, photo courtesy of Pearl Lam Gallery

 

Painter Jinshi Zhu creates abstract oil paintings focused on texture, through endless layers of color and paint. Inspired by the German Expressionist movement and their unconventional techniques, Zhu often creates these layers using a spatula or shovel.

 

The Haas Brothers at R & Company

 

‘Socrata Floor Lamps and Furries’, photo courtesy of the artists

 

Twins Nikolai and Simon Haas have worked in pretty much every medium, from music and film to installation and visual art. Now focused mostly on their sculpture and installation work, The Haas Brothers highlight themes including sexuality, science fiction, psychedelia and politics.

Jeffrey Gibson at Roberts Projects

 

‘Power Power Power,’ 2017, photo courtesy of Roberts Projects

 

Artist Jeffrey Gibson relates his experience as a Native American growing up in a Western culture into large scale paintings and woven sculpture. Also inspired by dance and movement, from pow-wows to nightclubs and the work of Leigh Bowery, Gibson examines nostalgia, heritage and pre-colonized Native American life.

 

Oh, and if looking at all this great art makes you hungry, check out our guide to The Armory’s pop-up restaurants.

 

Andy Warhol’s Upper East Side Studio Hits the Market For $10 Million

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Photo via Cushman & Wakefield

During the early ’60s, Andy Warhol was working primarily as a commercial artist, having just begun to assert himself as a fine artist and local provocateur. In January 1963, he moved into an Upper East Side studio, his first private space, which was then an affordable fire house, available for only $150 per month. More than half a century later and following years of gentrification, Warhol’s historic site, 159 East 87th Street, is on the market for a steep $9,975,000 and “offers a developer a blank canvass [sic] to create boutique condominiums, a mixed-use rental or a luxury townhouse.” 

Six months before the iconic pop artist moved into his UES space, he’d established a polarizing name with his newly debuted Campbell Soup Can paintings. “In 1963, [Warhol] was only just becoming known as a fine artist, so it’s no wonder he didn’t invest in a fancier studio,” said Warhol biographer Blake Gopnik to Artnet NewsThe building was “a wreck, with leaks in the roof and holes in the floors, but it was better than trying to make serious paintings in the wood-paneled living-room of his Victorian townhouse, as he’d done for the previous couple of years.” Despite the shifty environment, Warhol still managed to create several pieces from his revered Death and Disaster series, as well as portraits of Elizabeth Taylor and Marilyn Monroe.

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Brillo Box (Soap Pads), 1964 (Photo via MoMA)

Warhol’s lease ended the following May, more than half a year before he moved into his legendary Silver Factory and unveiled his 1964 sculpture exhibition, Brillo Boxes—work philosopher Arthur Danto labeled the end of art. “What Warhol taught was that there is no way of telling the difference [between art and non-art] merely by looking,” Danto said. “The eye, so prized an aesthetic organ when it was felt that the difference between art and non-art was visible, was philosophically of no use whatever when the differences proved instead to be invisible.”

The two-story building, located between Lexington and Third Avenue, is currently being used for art storage and marketed by Cushman & Wakefield as a “boutique development site”—a far cry from its humble Warholian roots and testament to NYC’s ever-evolving real estate landscape.

The Feast’s Pop Art Pop Up

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It’s hard to imagine any other antics cramming their way into the latest installment of The Feast, a roving pop-up restaurant that hosts themed “dining experiences” all over New York City. Last Thursday was the inaugural evening of Pop Art Pop Up, a three-night affair that’s being held in a soon-to-be-opened Times Square hotel The Sanctuary. The menu was inspired by works of art by Damian Hirst and Jeff Koons, among others. The space, as designed by Devinn Bruce, features wall-sized reproductions of the artworks that inspired the evening’s cuisine. Though the overall effect was meant to evoke the feel of being “inside the mind of Andy Warhol circa 1982,” the most attention grabbing of all the stunts crammed into Pop Art Pop Up is probably still the charming guest chef, Greg Grossman, a culinary darling who just turned fifteen.

“I have a weird life,” Grossman admitted, while preparing to plate the evening’s amuse bouche. Weird may only begin to describe this budding workaholic’s achievements. He’s already been featured on The Today Show, Oprah’s Sirius radio station and in The New York Post, to name a few, and he’s worked with some of the top chefs in the world. Still, there was something very genuine about Greg, and none of the megalomania that’s usually present in successful chefs. “These guys are my best friends,” he said, gesturing to the young men (yet still much older than Greg) around him.

Alan Philips, mastermind behind The Feast, found Greg though the same management agency that represents some of the other top chefs that have cooked for Feast. Though Phillips has been hosting the evenings for over a year now, he knew that with all the other temporary restaurants and pop-ups, he would have to do something bigger this time.

There’s already an inherent theatricality to a pop-up or temporary restaurant like the ones that have been blooming across New York over the past few years, and marrying that concept with the art world is such an apt coupling that it seems nearly obvious. Devinn Bruce’s transformation from what was a raw, mid-construction hotel lobby to a sleek dining room is a feat unto itself. According to Mr. Bruce, this was done with the ceaseless labor of only three workers. The impeccable results are more polished and final-seeming than the term “pop up” suggests. But come Sunday the whole site will be demolished.

The evening’s festivities did double duty as a birthday party for Brandon Freid , a co-owner of The Santuary Hotel, along with his father, Hank Freid. The crowd was mostly friends of the Freids, guys who seemed to be aspiring New York hoteliers and women who may have been runners-up for The Real Housewives of New York.

Though the evening was billed as a mix of entertainment and cuisine, the result was just a mix. Club-volume DJ music caused a gentleman at my table to muse, “This reminds me of Fire Island,” though I could barely hear him. Soon the tunes gave way to a performance by an unnamed singer, an objectively talented man who walked around the room singing, among other things, a tortured Lionel Richie cover. Patricia Field, who sat across from me looking baffled as I was about the spectacle, stuck her pointer fingers into her ears.

Eventually the waitstaff scurried around the room carrying the amuse bouche, an orange orb make of frozen carrot juice with a coconut filling. Looks were exchanged at the table akin to those shared at a child’s ballet performance or piano recital. A second dish of scallops on a roasted slice of tomato was full of hits and misses— a creamy dot of tamarind sauce beside a sprinkling of over-cooked corn kernels— but the overall concept was interesting and there were certainly a lot of good ideas on the plate. Knowing that Greg was working out of a room that I could only loosely call a kitchen, it was impressive.

Fittingly, the dish inspired by Andy Warhol, arguably the father of pop art, was the most satisfying. A quartet of tastings were arranged beautifully on the plate: salmon paired with herb-infused potatoes, bass atop grated beets and a sautéed circle of leek, lamb resting on a pillow of yam mash and a sliver of beef on a cloud of pureed purple potato. Reminiscent of the colors and patterns of Warhol’s iconic Marilyn Monroe, this was the moment of the evening that made Grossman’s title of Wunderkind seem earned.

In the end it seems that all of The Feast’s attention grabbing tactics has grabbed plenty of attention. Both of the remaining evenings of Pop Art Pop Up are sold out. The only question that remains is, what could The Feast possibly do to top this one?