Sandstorm Coachella Massacre

Sandy Kim in a sandstorm outfit.

Sometimes during Coachella you really have to take time to rejuvenate at one of the many oasis spots that pop up for the weekend across Palm Desert.

Especially if a sandstorm is threatening to potentially ruin your life. Which is exactly what happened. The gritty winds devoured my camera, and these are the last photos I got before Coachella finally got to me.

1Niki Takesh at the Stylebop party
Niki Takesh at the Stylebop party

2DevHynes from BloodOrange
Dev Hynes from Blood Orange

3 4Pool at the Guess Hotel party
Pool at the Guess hotel party

5 6 7ShaninaShaik
Shanina Shaik

8KarleySciortino from Slutever
Karley Sciortino from Slutever

9 11Sandy Kim and boyfriend Colby from DIIV walking in a sandstorm
Sandy Kim and boyfriend Colby from DIIV walking in a sandstorm

 17makeoutselfie
Makeout selfie

Doin’ Angel Haze’s Coachella Hair + 91,000 Other Things

Angel Haze doing her hair in our house before performing with Bastille

This weekend ninety-one thousand people made the pilgrimage to the desert for Coachella. It’s almost too much to handle. On Thursday and Friday we hit every party we could, starting with Tillys x Dickies desert lounge at the Ace Hotel, then headed to the This Is A Love Song house for an after hours, woke up and chilled at HAIM’s house to meet up with our friend Angel Haze while she got ready for her debut Coachella performance with Bastille, saw emo favs AFI before going to soho house for the Elle party with Ireland Baldwin, then came back to see The Knife’s freaky performance art and Outkast’s return performance.  But whether you’re at a chic event, chilling at a pool, or seeing your fav bands, it’s all about who you’re with and who you love.

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May Kwok at the Ace Hotel Dickies party

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The Kin performing at Dickies x Tilly’s desert lounge

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Extreme selfie with the designers of This is a Love Song & Sydney Reising

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After Party at This is a Love Song’s Palm Springs house

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Angela Pham

R1-05599-012A R1-05599-017A R1-05599-020A Our view from our Indio house

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Angel Haze

R1-05599-022A Me in our pool

R1-05600-004A Coachella art installations

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Ireland Baldwin and John Tuite sharing a ringpop on our way to the Elle party

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David-Simon Dayan and Ireland Baldwin at the
Elle party

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Crowd at The Knife

 

I’m Lost, Where’s Coachella?

Last week our intrepid photo diarist Carlos Santolalla flew to Los Angeles. That was the easy part. Finding his way to Coachella proved more difficult. But it’s all good when you’re with your friends.

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Mario Lopez

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Zaina

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Me

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Club DAB

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Me and Zaina at Acabar (Roland Emmerich’s restaurant)

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Zaina and Jesse Hoffman, and the LA ‘it’ twins Brian and Brad Cowell

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Gummi Worm Goblets & Cookie Jar Milkshakes: Sugar Factory’s Best Food & Drink Porn

Meet Sugar Factory: Meatpacking’s new brasserie/explosive dessert spot where 36oz bubbling cocktail chalices full of lollipops and gummi worms land on the table, and hot fudge-drenched, submarine-sized, red velvet sundaes take up the width of your lap. It’s the classy, marble-bar-chandelier American brasserie that refuses to grow up. Meatpacking’s first and only outrageous dessert palace where the entire dinner kitchen is open until 4am all weekend long. 

But what else can you expect from a restaurant that comes direct from Vegas, and has already attracted to its NY location celebs like Kevin Jonas and the NY Giants?  Sure, Sugar blasts Taylor Swift music, and there’s a good chance you’ll find a 16-year-old girl in Lululemon leggings picking out candy necklaces by the entrance’s candy shop, but with a list of 32 goblets, cosmos, and (Reese’s & s’mores) martinis – Sugar Factory is primed for late-night, sinful, post-Bagatelle action. And with downtown’s longtime lack of a charm-and-impress-your–date place like Serendipity, it is with great pride and pleasure that we welcome Sugar Factory to NYC. Now get in on some food & drink porn.

The Red Velvet Sundae That Takes Up The Width Of Your Lap.

The Must-Order Chinese Chicken Salad.

The Very-Easy-To-Finish White Gummi Goblet.

The Chocolate Cookie Jar Milkshake Stuffed With Oreo Cookies, Caramel, & Hot Fudge.

The View Of The Sexy Bar(tender).

When Attempting To Be Healthy: The Pan-Roasted Salmon & Asparagus.

The Fondue Finale: Pound Cake, Gummi Bears, Brownie Bites, & More.

What You Need To Know About Broadway’s New ‘Pippin’ Revival

We all want to live an extraordinary life. It’s challenging when things like taxes, delayed subway trains, and burnt coffee exist, but we try. Starting March 23rd, Broadway’s 31st longest-running show Pippin is returning to Broadway since its 1977 close, and bringing with it a whole new surge of inspiration to live an extraordinary life – which means you’re totally not off the hook this year. Having just returned from the open press rehearsal, here are a couple of things to  know about the show ahead of time.

1. Since Stephen Schwartz (composer/lyricist of Wicked) is the man behind Pippin’s music, please do expect to walk in already knowing the show’s ‘70s pop anthem “Corner Of The Sky,” and/or singing it on your way out.

2. Pippin, played by Matthew James Thomas (former Spider-Man in Turn Off the Dark), resembles a bit of a 20-something, very attractive Peter Pan, which is slightly disconcerting, but somehow condoned when he sings and takes his shirt off.

3. The dance moves choreographed by the show’s original director/legend Bob Fosse are well-preserved and impeccably performed by the animated Patina Miller (starred in Sister Act), who’s the show’s "Leading Player" character.

4. Since the title character’s quest for an extraordinary life is told by a performance troupe, you will see lots of the following: dancers doing flips through hula hoops, human pyramids, Patina swaying across the stage mid-hula hooping, and impossibly-toned abs.

Previews begin March 23rd at the Music Box Theatre. Pippin opens April 25th.

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Jamie Foxx On His Latest Directing Project With Ron Howard and Working With Quentin Tarantino

Project Imaginat10n caught my imagination when a photographer caught a handcuffed NYC couple kissing just before they were separated and led to jail. He was the graffiti artist and she was the lookout. The shot seen around the world had a romantic True Romance feel to it. This image was disqualified because the photographer couldn’t get a release, but their fifteen minutes of fame created a lot of hype for this Canon project. Canon has gathered Jamie Foxx, Eva Longoria, Twitter co-founder Biz Stone, Marchesa designer Georgina Chapman, and LCD Soundsystem frontman James Murphy to direct ten-minute films based on photographs which inspire them. These photographs must be submitted by today. Two-time Academy Award-winning director Ron Howard will be on hand to guide this crew through the process. 

The new Quentin Tarantino project, Django Unchained, is a can’t-wait-to-see flick starring Jamie Foxx. Jamie gave me fifteen minutes of his famously valuable time to discuss.

How did you end up doing this project with Ron Howard?
I saw this campaign that Ron Howard was a part of with Canon, when they had the commercial, and I said, “Wow, that seems so interesting, that seems like such a great thing to be a part of.” And then when Canon opened it up and I became one of the guys who was actually going to get the opportunity to direct and look at these pictures and bring to life a good story, I thought, man, this is great. So Ron Howard and I had a relationship; we were sitting next to each other during the inauguration, when President Obama was becoming president, and then Ron eventually went on to be in the video “Blame It on the Alcohol” with me. It was cool to reconnect with him, only this time, under his tutelage, I’ll be able to get to do what I’ve wanted to do for a long time, which is direct my own projects and see if I can become a director that can be cinematic.

That brings me to my next question. I saw that back in 2000, you directed a couple of your own television shows and you did something in 2011: a TV movie.  You’ve done comedy, won an Academy Award, a Grammy, and now you are directing again. Where do you want to go with that?
I’ll tell you what: with the directing, what I’ve always told my people, I said, I’m telling you, from all of the exposure that I’ve had with these great directors – Oliver Stone, Michael Mann, Antoine Fuqua, Sam Mendes, and now Quentin Tarantino – I just think it’s a natural progression, and I feel like I want to be able to take another journey into a world that I feel I’ve learned from the best. I can’t wait to get the Canon opportunity; the cameras that they have really make it handy for what you want to accomplish and what you want to have your film look like in so many different ways and so many different angles and looks and feels. So, I can’t wait. I don’t want my short film to be just, “Okay, I finished.” I want it to be something that people will marvel at and say, “Wow, did you see that?” I want it to be something that once people see it, hopefully, you know… shoot man, I really want to go at it.

Do you think you have a leg up on your competition or your fellow directors here? You have Eva Longoria who has some movie and television experience; you have fashion designer Georgina Chapman; Biz Stone the Twitter co-founder; and you’ve got James Murphy LCD Soundsystem. Is there a slight competitiveness here?
You never know. These guys are all fantastic and they’re all visual and they have insight and that’s all it is when it comes to being a director; it’s what your vision is. I feel like I have the most pressure since I have worked with all these great directors and great projects, so I need to really make sure that I come through.

So I read that the themes are: character, mood, backstory, relationship, goal, obstacle, the unknown, and of course the last one: discovery. Do you have any preconceived notion on a theme, or are you just going to let the photos speak and react?
I would email Quentin Tarantino periodically and say, “I hope your movie is talking to you like your friend,” so I want to be able to look at these pictures and have these pictures speak to me like a friend, and once I do that, then I’ll know exactly what it is I want to shoot and what I want to write about and the story I want to be told. I don’t want to jump the gun and say, you know, it’s going to be this, it’s going to be this. I just want to really get the chance to soak all of the pictures in and go from there.

One of the things that got the public’s attention and brought people to this project was that couple that got caught holding hands on their way to jail, which was an incredibly romantic moment or something out of the end of a Tarantino-written film, like True Romance. It captivated everybody’s mind. How did you feel about that moment? Did that picture say something to you?
The thing about me is that I can really see a picture with so many different stories that people could tell. There’s so many different interpretations, so I want to see what I would come up with. I would take that certain picture and look at it and make it something different, so that’s what’s exciting about this process; it’s the fact that all of these pictures will speak to us in different ways and, like I said, I can’t wait to see what the pictures say to me.

You mentioned working with Quentin; I’ve seen a lot of people like Brad Pitt and Christian Slater talk about working with him… tell me something about Quentin that maybe we don’t know.
Remember the movie Amadeus about Mozart? I come from a musical background, and what’s great about Mozart is that he was able to write music as if he was writing his name. Quentin Tarantino is able to grab shots as if he is writing his name. He doesn’t make a big deal out of this, but I’m gonna make a big deal out of it. When we were shooting Django Unchained, Tarantino wasn’t satisfied with his endings, so he rewrote the ending in his trailer and at his house, and then he came back to the set, with it handwritten, and said, “Here’s our ending.” And the ending was better than the ending that was already in the movie. So to me, that separates him from anybody that I’ve seen, because the lines that he writes are absolutely classic, and to be able to take that and put the camera on it and then make it cinematic, is just amazing to me. And then his process, like a kid, playing music between scenes, having fun—for every hundred rolls of film we did, we took a shot of tequila or vodka or whatever it was.  He just made it fun, man. He told me, “When you leave this production, you will long to have these types of memories again.” He keeps it fun, so he’s definitely a gem.

You mentioned Mozart writing like he writes his name and Tarantino being able to move on-the-go and adjust and correct himself. How do you prepare as an actor? You didn’t become an actor early in your career, but you rose quickly. You blew me away with your performances in On Any Given Sunday and Ray. How do you prepare for a role? Do you act like you write your name?
Well, I’ll put it this way: I think you have to give it to a higher being—I call it God-given—that it’s something where it’s a sixth sense, you know? It’s something that you just feel. When it comes to acting, I just feel something. When it comes to creating, I just feel something. And that’s what it is. You can’t really put your finger on it. I’m always thankful, I’m always thankful that I am touched by whatever that is, that creative gene. It allows me to jump into different worlds—like music and movies—and really give those worlds respect. I can’t put my finger on it, but I have to maximize it. I know that I have to get into it and give all I can. When you look at my 10-minute film from this Canon project, I want to make you absolutely wowed by the performance from the actors and actresses, and the story that you see.

You talked about Ron Howard and Quentin, but what other directors, or any other kinds of creative people, have inspired you?
I’m inspired by Floyd Mayweather Jr.; I watch him and what he’s done in his career and how tough things have been, and am amazed at how he makes things happen with his charisma and acting. I’m inspired by Ray Lewis, a guy who’s played in the league almost 15, 16 years in football, and every time he speaks he’s so inspiring. LeBron James—a person who really, really wanted something, and set the wheels in motion that some people would be angry with him about, but he knows if he doesn’t do it in a certain way that he wouldn’t be able to get what he’s set out for. I’m inspired by President Obama, a person who is, even when it’s chaotic, still the coolest person in the room, and able to make a choice – even though it may not be the best political choice—but what I feel in my heart. I’m inspired by outside entities that fuel my ideas and stories in my art; that’s what I feel gives me the most feelings, when I use that type of energy that’s not in my field.

Courtney Stodden Poses as Sexy Bunny for Easter Photo Shoot

Titillating teen temptress Courtney Stodden spent Sunday sensually sauntering into some sexy woods for a scintillating Easter photo shoot. She boldly bared it all in a busty bunny bikini costume, cautiously bending over in search of some nasty, naughty neon eggs she could stridently shove into her bold, beautiful basket of lascivious love and fabulously forever-lasting famewhoring. Mmm, publicity! XOs 😉

Can’t get enough of Stodden’s sexy Easter Bunny suit? Check out this Daily Mail story for many more photos.

Village Voice’s Choice Eats Event Last Night, Guided Photo Tour Inside

When you stick hundreds of New Yorkers into a space the size of an amphitheatre, filled with over 80 of the five borough’s top restaurants, alcoholic beverages, and desserts, and tell them it’s “all-you-can-eat and drink,” what happens?

We turn into CAVE PEOPLE. Voracious, thirsty, hungry cavemen and women. Wildly primitive desires emerged at last night’s Choice Eats event, as men and women aggressively made their way to the front of the shoelace-long lines, grabbed for the largest meat-covered crostini, shrimp roll, and bowl of salted caramel ice cream, and ran around with toppled food platters and sauce-covered fingers.
 
So we were full after 15 minutes, or we have some frou-frou diet to attend to. Who cares! For one night, we went wild. And it was oh-so-necessary.
 
Here’s our guided photo tour of the evening’s best:
 
Doughtnut Plant
 
Doughnut Plant’s peanut butter glaze and blackberry jelly donut. I’m still full, but I’m still craving this. 
 
Kafana
 
Scrumptious sausages at Kafana.
 
Bep
 
Bep’s mango salad makes healthy delicious. 
 
Ample Hills Creamery
 
Ample Hills Creamery’s Salted Crack Caramel ice cream. Made with salted butter caramel ice cream and bits of their "crack." Aptly named. 
 
Mile End
 
Mile End’s smoked meat bun. Sweet. Fluffy. Meaty. 
 
Tanoreen
 
Fried brussel sprouts topped with yogurt, tahini, and pomegranate sauce. Tanoreen does it again. 
 
Good Batch
 
The Good Batch’s chocolate chip cookies. So soft, but chewy, yet doughy. An enigma, actually.
 
Fay Da Bakery
 
Fay Da Bakery’s pork bun. Always the best.
 
S'more Bakery
 
S’mores Bakery. Toasted right infront of you. 
 
Ditch Plains
 
Ditch Plains’ mac ‘n’ cheese-covered hot dog. It’s worth the heart attack. 

Fashion Gallery: 5 Models Who’ll Be Burning Up Runways in 2012

As part of our 2012 New Regime issue, we scoured the world’s runways, model houses, and shopping malls to find five of fashion’s freshest and most promising faces. Introducing, in no particular order, Kristina V, Kolfinna K, Megan Will, Veronika Vilim, and Janice Alida. Check out our exclusive gallery featuring all five, after the jump. Photography by Jason Kim. Styling by Christopher Campbell.