Our Favorite Looks From This Year’s Oscars Red Carpet

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The Oscars proved to be filled with especially extraordinary fashion this year, even if the winners were a bit of a snooze. (Where was the justice for Timothée, Saiorse, and Get Out??) From Rita Moreno revisiting her glamorous 1962 gown to Tiffany Haddish representing her heritage on the carpet, these were the best style moments.

 

Rita Moreno Revisiting A Classic

After winning Best Supporting Actress in 1962 for her role in West Side Story, we thought we’d sadly seen the last of Moreno’s iconic printed gown. How wrong we were.

 

 

Tiffany Haddish Representing Her Father and Her Heritage

Haddish donned an Eritrean princess dress to honor her late father and his homeland of Eritrea.

 

#Eritrea #weready #thelastblackunicorn

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Saoirse Ronan Delivering Artful Pink Majesty

Ronan unfortunately did not take home an Oscar last night, but her Calvin Klein by Appointment gown actually was a last-minute nominee for Best Picture.

 

 

Timothée Chalamet in All White

Chalamet was robbed by an Academy that favors old men, but he still dazzled in an all-white tuxedo.

 

#oscars2018 #timotheechalamet #callmebyyourname

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Nicole Kidman in An Electric Blue Bow

Nicole may have kept her work focused more on television this year, but that didn’t stop her from stealing the show on this year’s Oscar’s red carpet in Armani.

 

The 10 Biggest Snubs of This Year’s Oscar Noms

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The Oscar noms have proven to be a jolly old time for many films this year: Get Out, Lady Bird, and The Shape of Water have all done swimmingly, as has Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. But there were several actors and filmmakers left out of this year’s picks. From seasoned vets robbed of expected praise to newcomers with their Academy debuts snatched away from them, we take a look at this year’s ten biggest snubs:

 

Luca Guadagnino, Call Me By Your Name

While the film adaptation of Andre Aciman’s gay romance novel certainly received plenty of love, including for Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, and and Best Actor, openly gay Guadagnino was sadly left out – particularly shocking as the film’s direction is one of its greatest strengths.

Tiffany Haddish, Girls Trip

While it’s not exactly surprising that the Academy has shunned comedies once again, Haddish was an exception: she had won the New York Film Critics’ Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress, and thanks to her over-the-top-hysterical role in the film, there was hope she just might carry that buzz all the way to the Oscars. Sadly, it was not to be.

Tilda Swinton, Okja

The truth is, Okja could have comprised all ten snubs in this list – it’s without question one of the year’s best films, unfortunately overlooked all season. Perhaps it’s because it came out straight to Netflix, or perhaps it’s because people don’t take movies about CGI pigs seriously. Either way, see Okja – Swinton’s is just one of the many exceptional performances in it.

Armie Hammer, Call Me By Your Name

While Timothée Chalamet is the decided star of Guadagnino’s film, Hammer gave a pretty stellar performance as well. His take on Oliver was subtle, human, and charming, and at the beginning of awards season, he seemed to be poised for Academy greatness. Now, however, it’s confirmed that we will have to put all of our prayers into Chalamet’s Elio.

Tom Hanks, The Post

Streep scored an Oscar nom for The Post but, sadly, five-time Oscar nominee Hanks won’t be considered for a sixth He’s won twice, most recently for Forrest Gump in 1994.

Dee Rees, Mudbound

Mudbound is another critically-acclaimed film left out to dry come awards season, further contributing to our theory that the Academy is biased against movies released through streaming services. It’s not a total shutout for Rees, however – although she wasn’t nominated for Direction, she scored for Best Adapted Screenplay, and her cinematographer Rachel Morrison also received a nomination, as well as Best Supporting Actress Mary J. Blige.

Steven Spielberg, The Post

Spielberg wasn’t nominated for Best Director – though, honestly, boo hoo. He’s won 3 and been nominated another 11 times, so it’s safe to say this shutout won’t kill him. Still, his direction of The Post has received much acclaim, and it’s a bit shocking to see the Hollywood titan ignored.

Holly Hunter, The Big Sick

After The Big Sick debuted at last year’s Sundance, where it won Best Original Screenplay, Holly Hunter seemed a shoe-in for Best Supporting Actress. As the year progressed, however, the category seems to have just become too crowded, and Hunter sadly hasn’t made the cut.

Seo-Hyun Ahn, Okja

We have to give some more love to Okja. We’ve already stated our case about how it’s the most under-appreciated film of the year, and we’ve already given the obvious love to Our President, Ms. Swinton. But the truth is Okja’s narrative and emotional care is carried by and large solely by 14-year-old Korean actress Seo-Hyun Ahn, who delivers a performance that is just as much psychologically complex as it is physically grueling.

Michael Stuhlbarg, Call Me By Your Name

We’d be remiss if we didn’t mention Stuhlbarg’s performance as Elio’s warm-hearted father – while he doesn’t get much screen time, he does have a pivotal scene at the end of the film that rescues the gay community as a whole from certain destruction.

Octavia Spencer Shatters Records For Black Female Actresses With Third Oscar Nomination

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This year’s Oscar nominations have proven to be perhaps the most diverse and inclusive yet; and at the forefront of that is Octavia Spencer, who just scored her third consecutive nom for The Shape of Water

Spencer is now the first black actress in Oscar history to receive two consecutive nominations after a win (she took home Best Supporting Actress in 2011 for The Help and was nominated again for her role in last year’s Hidden Figures.) It also makes her the first black actress in the Oscars 90-year history to receive nominations in back-to-back years, and ties her as the most nominated black actress ever, alongside Viola Davis, who won Best Supporting Actress last year for her role in Fences. 

Black male actors have received significantly more noms throughout the Academy’s history. Denzel Washington, who is nominated this year for his role in Roman J. Israel, Esq., has earned five other nominations and two further wins, as well as a nomination as a producer on Fences. 

Rachel Morrison, the cinematographer on Mudbound, also made history this year when she became the first woman ever to be nominated in that category.

Here is a November 2017 Octavia Spencer interview with The Movie Times.

 

The Oscar Nominations Are Finally Here: ‘The Shape of Water’ Leads With 13

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It’s finally here – the day we’ve all been waiting for ever since the Moonlight/ La La Land Best Picture fiasco: the Oscar noms have been announced. It’s been a tight race, in which Three Billboards appears to have established itself as the frontrunner for Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor, and maybe even Best Picture, while The Shape of Water has proven a favorite this awards season, but not necessarily the most likely to win. It leads with 13 nominations.

In more exciting news, Get Out scored noms for Jordan Peele for Best Directing, Picture, and Writing, making him only the third director ever to receive all three noms on a debut feature. Daniel Kaluuya also scored a Best Actor nomination for the film.

Greta Gerwig, too, did well for herself, earning noms for Best Directing and Writing; and Lady Bird also has been nominated for Best Picture, though since Gerwig isn’t a producer on the film she can’t technically claim the same record as Peele.

Call Me By Your Name was nominated for Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Actor for Timothée Chalamet. Also notable is that A Fantastic Woman, the Chilean film starring trans actress Daniela Vega, was nominated for Best Foreign Film.

The Oscars are hosted this year by Jimmy Kimmel, and air March 4 on ABC. Take a look at the full list below.

 

BEST PICTURE

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
Peter Spears, Luca Guadagnino, Emilie Georges and Marco Morabito, Producers

DARKEST HOUR
Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Lisa Bruce, Anthony McCarten and Douglas Urbanski, Producers

DUNKIRK
Emma Thomas and Christopher Nolan, Producers

GET OUT
Sean McKittrick, Jason Blum, Edward H. Hamm Jr. and Jordan Peele, Producers

LADY BIRD
Scott Rudin, Eli Bush and Evelyn O’Neill, Producers

PHANTOM THREAD
JoAnne Sellar, Paul Thomas Anderson, Megan Ellison and Daniel Lupi, Producers

THE POST
Amy Pascal, Steven Spielberg and Kristie Macosko Krieger, Producers

THE SHAPE OF WATER
Guillermo del Toro and J. Miles Dale, Producers

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin and Martin McDonagh, Producers

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

TIMOTHÉE CHALAMET
Call Me by Your Name

DANIEL DAY-LEWIS
Phantom Thread

DANIEL KALUUYA
Get Out

GARY OLDMAN
Darkest Hour

DENZEL WASHINGTON
Roman J. Israel, Esq.

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

WILLEM DAFOE
The Florida Project

WOODY HARRELSON
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

RICHARD JENKINS
The Shape of Water

CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
All the Money in the World

SAM ROCKWELL
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

SALLY HAWKINS
The Shape of Water

FRANCES MCDORMAND
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

MARGOT ROBBIE
I, Tonya

SAOIRSE RONAN
Lady Bird

MERYL STREEP
The Post

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

MARY J. BLIGE
Mudbound

ALLISON JANNEY
I, Tonya

LESLEY MANVILLE
Phantom Thread

LAURIE METCALF
Lady Bird

OCTAVIA SPENCER
The Shape of Water

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

THE BOSS BABY
Tom McGrath and Ramsey Naito

THE BREADWINNER
Nora Twomey and Anthony Leo

COCO
Lee Unkrich and Darla K. Anderson

FERDINAND
Carlos Saldanha

LOVING VINCENT
Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman and Ivan Mactaggart

CINEMATOGRAPHY

BLADE RUNNER 2049
Roger A. Deakins

DARKEST HOUR
Bruno Delbonnel

DUNKIRK
Hoyte van Hoytema

MUDBOUND
Rachel Morrison

THE SHAPE OF WATER
Dan Laustsen

COSTUME DESIGN

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
Jacqueline Durran

DARKEST HOUR
Jacqueline Durran

PHANTOM THREAD
Mark Bridges

THE SHAPE OF WATER
Luis Sequeira

VICTORIA & ABDUL
Consolata Boyle

DIRECTING

DUNKIRK
Christopher Nolan

GET OUT
Jordan Peele

LADY BIRD
Greta Gerwig

PHANTOM THREAD
Paul Thomas Anderson

THE SHAPE OF WATER
Guillermo del Toro

DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)

ABACUS: SMALL ENOUGH TO JAIL
Steve James, Mark Mitten and Julie Goldman

FACES PLACES
Agnès Varda, JR and Rosalie Varda

ICARUS
Bryan Fogel and Dan Cogan

LAST MEN IN ALEPPO
Feras Fayyad, Kareem Abeed and Søren Steen Jespersen

STRONG ISLAND
Yance Ford and Joslyn Barnes

DOCUMENTARY (SHORT SUBJECT)

EDITH+EDDIE
Laura Checkoway and Thomas Lee Wright

HEAVEN IS A TRAFFIC JAM ON THE 405
Frank Stiefel

HEROIN(E)
Elaine McMillion Sheldon and Kerrin Sheldon

KNIFE SKILLS
Thomas Lennon

TRAFFIC STOP
Kate Davis and David Heilbroner

FILM EDITING

BABY DRIVER
Paul Machliss and Jonathan Amos

DUNKIRK
Lee Smith

I, TONYA
Tatiana S. Riegel

THE SHAPE OF WATER
Sidney Wolinsky

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
Jon Gregory

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

A FANTASTIC WOMAN
Chile

THE INSULT
Lebanon

LOVELESS
Russia

ON BODY AND SOUL
Hungary

THE SQUARE
Sweden

MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

DARKEST HOUR
Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski and Lucy Sibbick

VICTORIA & ABDUL
Daniel Phillips and Lou Sheppard

WONDER
Arjen Tuiten

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)

DUNKIRK
Hans Zimmer

PHANTOM THREAD
Jonny Greenwood

THE SHAPE OF WATER
Alexandre Desplat

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI
John Williams

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
Carter Burwell

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)

MIGHTY RIVER
from Mudbound; Music and Lyric by Mary J. Blige, Raphael Saadiq and Taura Stinson

MYSTERY OF LOVE
from Call Me by Your Name; Music and Lyric by Sufjan Stevens

REMEMBER ME
from Coco; Music and Lyric by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez

STAND UP FOR SOMETHING
from Marshall; Music by Diane Warren; Lyric by Lonnie R. Lynn and Diane Warren

THIS IS ME
from The Greatest Showman; Music and Lyric by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul

PRODUCTION DESIGN

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
Production Design: Sarah Greenwood; Set Decoration: Katie Spencer

BLADE RUNNER 2049
Production Design: Dennis Gassner; Set Decoration: Alessandra Querzola

DARKEST HOUR
Production Design: Sarah Greenwood; Set Decoration: Katie Spencer

DUNKIRK
Production Design: Nathan Crowley; Set Decoration: Gary Fettis

THE SHAPE OF WATER
Production Design: Paul Denham Austerberry; Set Decoration: Shane Vieau and Jeff Melvin

SHORT FILM (ANIMATED)

DEAR BASKETBALL
Glen Keane and Kobe Bryant

GARDEN PARTY
Victor Caire and Gabriel Grapperon

LOU
Dave Mullins and Dana Murray

NEGATIVE SPACE
Max Porter and Ru Kuwahata

REVOLTING RHYMES
Jakob Schuh and Jan Lachauer

SHORT FILM (LIVE ACTION)

DEKALB ELEMENTARY
Reed Van Dyk

THE ELEVEN O’CLOCK
Derin Seale and Josh Lawson

MY NEPHEW EMMETT
Kevin Wilson, Jr.

THE SILENT CHILD
Chris Overton and Rachel Shenton

WATU WOTE/ALL OF US
Katja Benrath and Tobias Rosen

SOUND EDITING

BABY DRIVER
Julian Slater

BLADE RUNNER 2049
Mark Mangini and Theo Green

DUNKIRK
Richard King and Alex Gibson

THE SHAPE OF WATER
Nathan Robitaille and Nelson Ferreira

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI
Matthew Wood and Ren Klyce

SOUND MIXING

BABY DRIVER
Julian Slater, Tim Cavagin and Mary H. Ellis

BLADE RUNNER 2049
Ron Bartlett, Doug Hemphill and Mac Ruth

DUNKIRK
Mark Weingarten, Gregg Landaker and Gary A. Rizzo

THE SHAPE OF WATER
Christian Cooke, Brad Zoern and Glen Gauthier

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI
David Parker, Michael Semanick, Ren Klyce and Stuart Wilson

VISUAL EFFECTS

BLADE RUNNER 2049
John Nelson, Gerd Nefzer, Paul Lambert and Richard R. Hoover

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2
Christopher Townsend, Guy Williams, Jonathan Fawkner and Dan Sudick

KONG: SKULL ISLAND
Stephen Rosenbaum, Jeff White, Scott Benza and Mike Meinardus

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI
Ben Morris, Mike Mulholland, Neal Scanlan and Chris Corbould

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES
Joe Letteri, Daniel Barrett, Dan Lemmon and Joel Whist

WRITING (ADAPTED SCREENPLAY)

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
Screenplay by James Ivory

THE DISASTER ARTIST
Screenplay by Scott Neustadter & Michael H. Weber

LOGAN
Screenplay by Scott Frank & James Mangold and Michael Green; Story by James Mangold

MOLLY’S GAME
Written for the screen by Aaron Sorkin

MUDBOUND
Screenplay by Virgil Williams and Dee Rees

WRITING (ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY)

THE BIG SICK
Written by Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani

GET OUT
Written by Jordan Peele

LADY BIRD
Written by Greta Gerwig

THE SHAPE OF WATER
Screenplay by Guillermo del Toro & Vanessa Taylor; Story by Guillermo del Toro

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
Written by Martin McDonagh

Oscars Accountants Responsible for Snafu Will Not Be Returning

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The two accountants responsible for Sunday night’s infamous Best Picture mixup have been let go from overseeing any future Academy Awards, Vulture reports.

Brian Cullinan and Martha Ruiz of PricewaterhouseCoopers were responsible for overseeing every winning envelope of the night – apparently, Cullinan had tweeted a photo of Best Actress winner Emma Stone with her award backstage moments before handing Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty the wrong envelope.

Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, announced that the pair would not be asked back to work the Oscars again. She also expressed gratitude for the grace of the La La Land producers, whom she said “went from a nominee to a winner to a presenter in a matter of minutes.”

Just to refresh your memories, here’s the craziness of the Oscars’ final moments again:

Brandon Maxwell Designs Custom Gown For Syrian Mother and Refugee For Oscars Red Carpet

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Photo: @BrandonMaxwell on Instagram

Rising designer and frequent Lady Gaga-collaborator Brandon Maxwell dressed Hala Amil, star of the Oscar-nominated documentary short Watani: My Homeland, for this year’s Oscars red carpet.

In a touching Instagram post, Maxwell shared some of the story behind Amil and his decision to create a stunning purple gown for her.

“Hala Kamil made her red carpet debut tonight at the 89th Academy Awards in a custom Brandon Maxwell look, made in purple to represent the color of her favorite flower, which happens to be my mother’s favorite color as well,” he wrote. “To me, every woman is a star and every star has a story. Hala’s story sincerely touched me and I am truly honoured that I had the privilege to create this look for her celebrating this momentous occasion. The goal for my collection is always to empower all women and to not just make them look beautiful, but feel beautiful as well.”

He continued to reveal a moving piece of Kamil’s past relationship to film’s biggest night: “She used to stay up with her husband every year and watch the Oscars from her home in Aleppo, which has now been destroyed, and tonight she walks the carpet. I hope she is having the time of her life.”

Take a look at the custom gown below:

Syrian refugee, mother of four, and focus of the Academy Award nominated short documentary film Watani: My Homeland, Hala Kamil made her red carpet debut tonight at the 89th Academy Awards in a custom #brandonmaxwell look, made in purple to represent the color of her favorite flower, which happens to be my mother’s favorite color as well. To me, every woman is a star and every star has a story. Hala’s story sincerely touched me and I am truly honoured that I had the privilege to create this look for her celebrating this momentous occasion. The goal for my collection is always to empower all women and to not just make them look beautiful, but feel beautiful as well. Hala’s strength and courage throughout her experiences is supremely admirable. Seeing her walk the red carpet full of confidence and elegance, and being a small part of her special night means the world to me. She used to stay up with her husband every year and watch the Oscars from her home in Aleppo, which has now been destroyed, and tonight she walks the carpet. I hope she is having the time of her life. Styled by the wonderful and truly amazing @sweetbabyjamie

A post shared by Brandon Maxwell (@brandonmaxwell) on

Watani: My Homeland was directed by Marcel Mettelsiefen and nominated this year for Best Documentary Short Subject. Watch the trailer below:

Chrissy Teigen Feigns Sleep During Casey Affleck’s Acceptance Speech

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Image courtesy of The Academy

Last night’s Oscars, while certainly exciting at the last moment, were for the most part way too long and drawn out. It’s no wonder Ms. Teigen found herself getting droopy in the eyes during the show. Though, when the sexual assualt-accused Casey Affleck took the stage last night to accept Best Actor, we were delighted to see Teigen’s choice timing to feign dozing off while Ben’s brother thanked his producers.

 

 

Last year, Teigen showed her true colors in a similar fashion, giving us this face when Stacey Dash took the stage:

Teigen’s whole household had quite the night last night – husband John Legend gave a beautiful rendition of “City of Stars” during the show, accompanied by gorgeous, ethereal dancers reminiscent of scenes in La La Land: 

Your Alternative Guide to the Oscars, With the Awards You Really Care About

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Film’s biggest night will take place this Sunday, of course, and Oscar prediction lists are popping up everywhere. But what about the awards that won’t be announced at the main event? The ones you really care about?

And so it is that we’ve put together a celebration of moments in cinema this year sadly overlooked by the Academy – The Alternative Oscars 2016-2017.. Feel free to bust out your ball gown and grab yourself a date before reading.

Best Snot goes to… Viola Davis, Fences!

Let’s face it, if Viola doesn’t take home Best Supporting Actress this year we’re done watching the Oscars. But, let’s not forget about Fences’ other big supporting star: Viola’s iconic snot.

Best Eyeballs goes to…. Emma Stone, La La Land!

We’re big fans of Emma and all she did this year, and we sincerely think she’s deserving of a Best Actress golden statue. But that’s mostly because her eyes pierced our souls throughout Damien Chazelle’s film – they were so big, so controlled, and so breathtakingly bulbous.

Best Scene goes to… J.J. Totah, Other People!

Chris Kelly’s Other People flew somewhat under the radar this Oscar season, but it was a truly fantastic film, and J.J. Totah’s dance scene halfway through was the funniest, most powerful, inspired performance of the year in our opinion.

Best Style Onscreen goes to… Tilda Swinton, A Bigger Splash!

While we thought the film was self-indulgent and, frankly, boring, Tilda’s fashion in every scene was legendary, architectural, and, in true Swinton form, weirdly angular.

Best Hero goes to… Felicity Jones, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story!

Star Wars is really impressing us with its production of a super successful spinoff film – and that’s in large part thanks to the funny, complex, troubled, and valiant Felicity Jones.

Best Character goes to… Alex Hibbert/ Ashton Sanders/ Trevante Rhodes as Little/ Chiron/ Black, Moonlight!

Moonlight absolutely needs to win Best Picture this year, and that’s thanks to the incredibly thoughtful, complex, and daring writing of the film’s main character, portrayed over three time periods by three incredible actors.

Best Tween Heartthrobs in a Life or Death Situation goes to… Emma Roberts and Dave Franco, Nerve!

Don’t judge – Nerve was honestly kind of fun to watch. And both its leads were silly and sensational.

Best Cast goes to… Zootopia!

Zootopia was really good. No further questions at this time.

Best Appearance of Natalie Portman goes to… Natalie Portman, Jackie!

Natalie really wows us every time, and so here is her annual award.

Best Person Not in a Film This Year goes to… Rihanna!

She’s just so cool. And ANTI deserved way more Grammys love.

 

There you have it! The real winners this year. Tune in to the Oscars this Sunday at 7 PM EST for less prestigious categories.

 

Oscar Noms More Diverse Than Ever, ‘La La Land’ Ties ‘Titanic’ for Most Noms Ever: The Complete List

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At long last, after months of speculation and debate, the 2017 Oscar nominations have arrived, and the choices are actually quite interesting.

7 actors of color have received nominations, the most in Oscars history: Denzel Washington and Viola Davis for Fences, naturally, as well as Mahershala Ali and Naomie Harris for Moonlight, Ruth Negga for Loving, Octavia Spencer for Hidden Figures, and Dev Patel for Lion. In addition, for the first time in Oscars history four of the five nominated documentary features have black directors.

La La Land leads the pack with fourteen nominations, tying with Titanic and All About Eve for the most ever for a single film. Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone, and Damien Chazelle all, predictably, received love.

Meryl Streep received a nomination for her work in Florence Fester Jenkins, making it her 20th nomination over the course of her career.

Take a look at the full list below.

Best Picture
Arrival
Fences
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or High Water
Hidden Figures
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Moonlight

Best Director
Damien Chazelle, La La Land
Barry Jenkins, Moonlight
Kenneth Lonergan, Manchester by the Sea
Denis Villeneuve, Arrival
Mel Gibson, Hacksaw Ridge

Best Actor
Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea
Denzel Washington, Fences
Ryan Gosling, La La Land
Andrew Garfield, Hacksaw Ridge
Viggo Mortensen, Captain Fantastic

Best Actress
Emma Stone, La La Land
Natalie Portman, Jackie
Meryl Streep, Florence Foster Jenkins
Isabelle Huppert, Elle
Ruth Negga, Loving

Best Supporting Actor
Mahershala Ali, Moonlight
Jeff Bridges, Hell or High Water
Dev Patel, Lion
Lucas Hedges, Manchester by the Sea
Michael Shannon, Nocturnal Animals

Best Supporting Actress
Viola Davis, Fences
Michelle Williams, Manchester by the Sea
Naomie Harris, Moonlight
Nicole Kidman, Lion
Octavia Spencer, Hidden Figures

Best Adapted Screenplay
Moonlight
Arrival
Fences
Lion
Hidden Figures

Best Original Screenplay
Manchester by the Sea
La La Land
Hell or High Water
The Lobster
20th Century Women

Best Foreign Language Film
Toni Erdmann
The Salesman
Land of Mine
Tanna
A Man Called Ove

Best Documentary Feature
O.J.: Made in America
13th
Fire at Sea
I Am Not Your Negro
Life Animated

Best Animated Feature
Zootopia
Kubo and the Two Strings
The Red Turtle
My Life As a Zucchini
Moana

Best Film Editing
La La Land
Moonlight
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or High Water

Best Original Song
“City of Stars,” La La Land
“Audition (The Fools Who Dream),” La La Land
“How Far I’ll Go,” Moana
“Can’t Stop the Feeling,” Trolls
“The Empty Chair,” Jim: The James Foley Story

Best Original Score
La La Land
Lion
Jackie
Moonlight
Passengers

Best Cinematography
La La Land
Moonlight
Arrival
Silence
Lion

Best Costume Design
Florence Foster Jenkins
La La Land
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Allied
Jackie

Best Makeup and Hairstyling
Star Trek Beyond
A Man Called Ove
Suicide Squad

Best Production Design
La La Land
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Hail, Caesar!
Arrival
Passengers

Best Sound Editing
Hacksaw Ridge
Arrival
Deepwater Horizon
La La Land
Sully

Best Sound Mixing
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
Hacksaw Ridge
La La Land
Arrival
13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

Best Visual Effects
The Jungle Book
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
Kubo and the Two Strings
Doctor Strange
Deepwater Horizon

Best Short Film, Live Action
Timecode
Silent Nights
La Femme et le TGV
Ennemis Interieurs
Sing

Best Short Film, Animated
Piper
Pearl
Borrowed Time
Blind Vaysha
Pear Cider and Cigarettes

Best Documentary, Short Subject
Joe’s Violin
The White Helmets
Extremis
Watani: My Homeland
4.1 Miles