Check Out a New ‘Stoker’ Featurette and See When It’s Coming to Theaters Near You

In the past few months, we’ve been getting ourselves excited for Park Chan-wook’s sinister drama, Stoker. And with gorgeous stills, haunting trailers, and pieces of the stunning soundtrack already released to entice us, now there’s a new “Characters” three-minute featurette on the film, giving us a taste of the Stoker family—Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, Matthew Goode, Dermot Mulroney, and Jacki Weaver—who call figure into this dark and sensual thriller. 

We have yet to see an advanced screening of the film but back in January, Variety reported that:

Park’s regular d.p. Chung-hoon Chung appears to be channeling photographer Gregory Crewdson’s eerily high-key Americana in his lighting schemes, while Clint Mansell’s characteristically rich, modernist score is embellished with haunting piano duets composed specifically for the film by Philip Glass. The repeated use of the Lee Hazlewood/Nancy Sinatra number "Summer Wine," meanwhile, is typical of the director’s cockeyed take on American culture. Long may he continue to explore. 

Well! That’s about all I need to hear; I’m in.

The film will be released on March 1st in New York but here’s when and where you can see the film otherwise:

March 1st, 2013
BOSTON, MA
Kendall Square Cinema,
Cambridge,MA

NEW YORK, NY
AMC Lincoln Square 13,
New York, NY

Sunshine Cinemas 5,
New York, NY

TORONTO,
ONVarsity Theatre,
Toronto, ON

LOS ANGELES, CA
The Landmark, Los Angeles, CA
Arclight 15, Hollywood, CA

March 8th, 2013
NEW YORK, NY
AMC Empire 25,
New York, NY

Chelsea Cinemas,
New York, NY

LOS ANGELES, CA
Arclight 16,
Sherman Oaks,
CAUniversity Town Center,
Irvine, CA

March 15th, 2013
ATLANTA, GA
Tara Cinemas,
Atlanta, GA

BOSTON, MA
Embassy 6,
Waltham, MA

BALTIMORE, MD
Charles 5 Theatre,
Baltimore, MD

WASHINGTON, DC
E-Street Cinema,
Washington, DC

DETROIT, MI
Main Art, 
Royal Oak, MI

NEW ORLEANS, LA
Elmwood Palace,
Harahan, LA

Canal Place Theatre,
New Orleans, LA

NEW YORK, NY
Bronxville Triplex,
Bronxville, NY

Manhasset Tri,
Manhasset, NY

Clairidge,
Montclair, NJ

Movies Twin,
Red Bank, NJ

Bethel Cinema,
Bethel, CT

Garden Cinema,
Norwalk, CT

Montgomery Cinemas,
Rocky Hill, NJ

Nitehawk Cinemas,
Brooklyn, NY

Kew Gardens Cinemas,
Kew Gardens, NY

Malverne Cinema,
Malverne, NY

Avon, 
Stamford, CT

BUFFALO, NY
Amherst, Buffalo,  NY

PHILADELPHIA,
PARitz,
Philadelphia, PA

CHARLOTTE, NC
Manor Theatre,
Charlotte, NC

MONTREAL, QC
Cineplex Odeon Forum,
Montreal, QC

CHICAGO, IL
Century Centre Cinema,
Chicago, IL

INDIANAPOLIS, IN
Keystone Art,
Indianapolis, IN

MILWAUKEE,
WIOriental,
Milwaukee, WI

AUSTIN,
TXViolet Crown Cinema,
Austin, TX

Arbor Cinemas,
Austin, TX

DALLAS, TX
Cinemark’s,
Plano, TXA

Angelika Film Center,
Dallas, TX

HOUSTON, TX
River Oaks, Houston, TX

MINNEAPOLIS, MN
Uptown, Minneapolis, MN

ST. LOUIS, MO
Tivoli,
St. Louis, MO

LOS ANGELES, CA
Burbank, Burbank, CA

Rancho Niguel,
Laguna Niguel, CA

Claremont,
Claremont, CA

Laemmle’s,
North Hollywood, CA

Fallbrook,
West Hills, CA

Arclight,
El Segundo, CA

Brea Stadium,
Brea, CA

UA Marketplace,
Long Beach, CA

Westlake Village Twin,
Westlake Village, CA

PALM SPRINGS, CA
Cinemas Palme D’or,
Palm Desert, CA

SAN DIEGO, CA
Hillcrest,
San Diego, CA

SANTA BARBARA, CA
Paseo Nuevo,
Santa Barbara, CA

DENVER, CO
Mayan,
Denver, CO

PHOENIX, AZ
Camelview,
Scottsdale, AZ

SEATTLE, WA
Lincoln Square,
Bellevue, WA

Meridian,
Seattle, WA

Sundance’s, 
Seattle, WA

MONTEREY, CA
Del Mar,
Santa Cruz, CA

PORTLAND, OR
Fox Tower,
Portland, OR

SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Metreon,
San Francisco, CA

Palo Alto Twin,
Palo Alto, CA

Century’s,
Pleasant Hill, CA

Santana Row,
San Jose, CA

Regency,
San Rafael, CA

California 3 Art Theatre,
Berkeley, CA

Listen to Philip Glass’ New Song ‘Duets’ From Park Chan-wook’s ‘Stoker’

With only a few weeks left before Stoker‘s theatrical premiere, we’ve already gotten a taste of Clint Mansell’s stunning musical compositions for the film. But as of today, we get another look into the sonic world of the film with new music from wonderful classical composer Philip Glass. Whereas his heavy and rich "In Full Bloom" was bone-chillingly dark and sensual, Glass’ "Duets" is more of pirouetting on the keys piano ballad and I love it. 

In Park Chan-wook’s film, the lives of India (played by Mia Wasikowska) and her emotionally unstable mother Evelyn (played by Nicole Kidman) take a turn for the dark when India’s uncle Charlie (played my Matthew Goode) comes to live with them in the wake of her father dying. India begins to suspect Charlie of ulterior movies, but instead of outrage or horror, this friendless girl becomes infatuated with him.

Take a look at some of the stills for the film below and listen to Glass and Mansell’s haunting tracks, which hopefully, will play a large hand in the emotional landscape of the film.

stkestoker2stoker2stoker

Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth Team Up for ‘Before I Go to Sleep’

After filming the upcoming WWII drama, The Railway Man together, The Hollywood Reporter informed us that Nicole Kidman was looking to re-team with her on-screen husband Colin Firth. Of course, who wouldn’t? And earlier this the fall, Kidman confirmed her next project, the psychological drama Before I Go to Sleep, the Rowan Joffe-helmed drama alongside Mark Strong. But now it looks like Nicole’s desire paid off! Firth is now slated to join the picture as her husband once again.

Based on the debut novel by British writer S.J. Watson and penned by Joffe, Before I Go to Sleep tells the story of a woman with amnesia who wakes every day with no knowledge of who she is but tries to reconstruct her memories from a journal she has been keeping. 50 First Dates? Nope! Apparently things get dark as terrifying new truths emerge and she is forced to question everyone around her. Kidman and Firth first hand at marriage is currently in post-production and is set to debut later this year. According to Variety, Joffe’s film will shoot in various locations throughout London beginning later this month.

Linkage: Lindsay Lohan Might Be an Escort, Jessica Simpson Can’t Stop Bonin’, & a Kris Kross Reunion

If you’re wondering how the hell Lindsay Lohan can get away with jetting across the globe and staying in fancy hotels with nothing but money from Playboy shoots and Lifetime movies, here’s a possible explanation on where she gets her money: she might be working as a high-class escort for the rich and not-so-famous. Some of her alleged clients include Prince Haji Abdul Azim, third in line of the throne of Brunei (which is a real place, not like Genovia), and painter Domingo Zapata. Of course, these allegations come from her scumbag father, Michael Lohan, so take them with a couple shakers of salt. [Radar]

Nicole Kidman is on the cover of The Hollywood Reporter, and she dishes about Scientology—sort of. When pressed, she’ll say only: ‘I’ve chosen not to speak publicly about Scientology. I have two children [adopted with Cruise] who are Scientologists—Connor [the Red Dawn actor is now 17] and Isabella [20]—and I utterly respect their beliefs.’” The cover story also revels that Modern Family’s Sophia Vergara was director Lee Daniels’s first choice for Kidman’s role in The Paperboy, so just imagine that crazy lady doing her own hair and makeup and peeing on Zac Efron. [THR]

Jessica Simpson, as always, is both a good indicator of the failures of sex education in this country and an example of how annoying celebrities can be if their publicists can’t get them to shut the hell up. The occasional singer and sometimes actress told Jay Leno last night that she’d like to get married to fiancé Eric Johnson, with whom she has one child and a second on the way, but, in her words, “he keeps knocking me up.” [Fox News]

Sarah Jessica Parker replaced Demi Moore as Gloria Steinem in the upcoming Lovelace, premiering at Sundance, after Moore’s hospitalization for exhaustion early last year. It turns out it was all for naught: Steinem’s role in the film has been cut. [EW]

Because of money, NBC is going to roll poor Betty White out again and make her watch a bunch of people “pay tribute” to her for Betty White’s 2nd Annual 90th Birthday Special. The party’s guest list includes folks like Blake Shelton, Bill Clinton, and Larry King, because who else could possibly ruminate on all of Betty White’s achievements as an old actress who still makes dirty jokes when forced to read from cue cards in front of a TV camera? [Deadline]

Kris Kross are getting back together because they left a lot of things unsaid, a lot of pants unsagged, and also realized how much of a boner everyone has for the ’90s. [Vulture]

Does keeping a “princess-free” household promote feminist ideals in children or just keep them from having fun? [Jezebel]

Die Hard director John McTiernan is headed to jail for a year and must pay a $100,000 fine. And no, it’s not because he directed that Rollerball remake. [Indiewire]

R.I.P., old guy from old TV show. [TMZ]

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Hear the First Piece of Clint Mansell’s Score for ‘Stoker’

When a filmmaker and composer continually collaborate over the years, their work becomes synonymous with one another’s—intwined in such a way that one’s images conjure up the other’s sounds, while one’s sounds evoke a very specific movie of the mind. And as one of the most symbiotic working relationships in the world of film right now, composer Clint Mansell and director Darren Aronofsky have shaped many a vision together—from the paranoid and heartbreaking score for Requiem for a Dream, to the classically haunted sounds of Black Swan, and the music to come for the upcoming Noah. But it’s also interesting when a composer that you’ve become so used to hearing in one very specific world lends their talents elsewhere as Mansell has done in recent years with films like Last Night, Moon, and now the psychological thriller, Stoker. From Oldboy director Park Chan-wook, the film stars Nicole Kidman, Mia Wasikowska, and Matthew Goode, and tells the tale as follows:

After India’s (Wasikowska’s) father dies in an auto accident, her Uncle Charlie (Goode), who she never knew existed, comes to live with her and her emotionally unstable mother Evelyn (Kidman). Soon after his arrival, she comes to suspect this mysterious, charming man has ulterior motives, but instead of feeling outrage or horror, this friendless girl becomes increasingly infatuated with him.

A piece from the score has now been released and we’re in love with it already. The snippet’s dark and bone-chilling yet sensual and delicate sounds evokes haunted and hallowed halls with a fright that builds from within. Fox Searchlight will be releasing the film on March 2nd and if you’re not already excited for the brooding drama, listen to "In Full Bloom", check out the trailers for the film, and peruse the full track list below.

1. I’m Not Formed By Things That Are of Myself Alone (dialogue)
2. Becomes the Color – Emily Wells
3. Happy Birthday (A Death in the Family) – Clint Mansell
4. Uncle Charlie – Clint Mansell
5. A Whistling Tune from a Lonely Man (dialogue)
6. The Hunter & the Game – Clint Mansell
7. Blossoming – Clint Mansell
8. Summer Wine – Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazelwood
9. A Family Affair – Clint Mansell
10. Becoming… – Clint Mansell
11. Duet – Philip Glass
12. Crawford Institute (Family Secrets) – Clint Mansell
13. Stride La Vampa (Verdi) – Victoria Cortez
14. The Hunter Plays the Game – Clint Mansell
15. In Full Bloom – Clint Mansell
16. The Hunter Becomes The Game – Clint Mansell
17. We Are Not Responsible For Who We Come to Be (Free)
18. If I Ever Had a Heart – Clint Mansell & Emily Wells (Bonus Track)

The Movies We Hated In 2012

My colleague Hillary Weston and I see a lot of movies. Sure, we both loved a bunch of movies this year, such as the delightful Moonrise Kingdom, the biting Bachelorette, the lovely Beasts of the Southern Wild. But there were a few that we downright hated. While we don’t always agree on which movies were, in fact, the worst, here’s a brief list of the films from this year that drove us into fits of fury.

Prometheus

Ridley Scott’s sort-of-prequel to Alien left me with more questions than answers. For example, why did they hire Guy Pearce to play an old man instead of, I dunno, an actual old person? Would that automated surgery machine take my health insurance? What’s Michael Fassbender’s daily caloric intake? (It must not be too high.) What I did take away was this: there is no way that this has anything to do with Scott’s original masterpiece other than casually tossing around “Alien prequel” will gain a lot of buzz. I couldn’t have explained the plot of this movie five minutes after leaving the theater, and I had thankfully forgotten Prometheus until I decided to come up with the worst movies I’d seen this year. So there you have it, folks: Prometheus is completely forgettable until you try your best to think of things that are horrifically bad.—TC

To Rome With Love

Oh Woody, how I love thee. But just because you have spent your entire career putting out film after film—back to back every year for what seems like an entire century now—doesn’t mean you should allow yourself to be so sloppy. Honestly, I doubt he even liked it, as even Allen’s character felt like someone doing a bad impression of himself. (Larry David, Owen Wilson, and Will Ferrell have all played better Woody Allens.) And don’t even both trying to find anything intelligent or redeeming about the women that populate the picture. Ellen Page’s boyish waif seductress was, to borrow a term in just about every one of his movies, "a pseudo intellectual" who was both manipulative and hollow; Greta Gerwig was an oblivious and passive goof who was supposed to be an intellectual but looked like an witless idiot; Alison Pill’s character was about as bland and lifeless as the canvas pants they wrongly put her in; and even the brilliant and beautiful Judy Davis had absolutely nothing to work with. The whole Penelope Cruz hooker storyline was absurd and a narrative bore, the Roberto Benigni "comedic" meditation on celebrity and the ego was unbearable to watch, and the father-turned-opera-singer sideline was no better than this Flintstones episode. By far the best part of the film was when I left to get a jumbo box of M&Ms and had to spend five minutes searching for the candy attendant. —HW

Silver Linings Playbook

There’s at least one movie released every Oscar season that everyone but me seems to like. This year, David O. Russell’s choppy mess of a movie fills the Little Miss Sunshine slot. Furthermore, this is the first movie that has ever forced me to leave the theater early. What did I hate most? The over-the-top quirkiness of the script? The propensity for each character to explain his or her madness rather than convey them with their actions? The fact the last thirty minutes are better than the first hour-and-a-half, at least according to every person I know who claims I cannot judge it solely on the first two-thirds of the film? (Go watch The Godfather and try to tell me the same thing, folks.) I’ve never been so grateful for Jessica Chastain, who will surely quash Jennifer Lawrence’s shot at an Oscar next spring. —TC

Lola Versus

After seeing Daryl Wein and Zoe Lister-Jones’s sophomore effort, I recall writing down a few initial thoughts: "This movie has little to no genuine feeling. The dialogue was trite. The characters were like posed mannequins in an Anthropologie window attempting to tell a joke." And the worst part: even the wonderful and talented Greta Gerwig as Lola and a score by Fall On Your Sword could not save this shallow attempt at an anti-typical romantic comedy. The filmmakers are both young, intelligent people who have lived in New York for years, but I have to wonder: have they ever spoken to other humans? Every moment was contrived and two-dimensional, and it was filled with pathetic portrayals of wallowing that weren’t even accurate save for the lovelorn title character’s affinity for binge drinking and sleeping with people she would later regret. Lola chastises herself, saying "I know I’m slutty, but I’m a good person," even though it’s made clear that her ex was the only person she had slept with until they broke up, and then she sleeps with two other guys. Even the sparse scenes with her ex have absolutely no chemistry, and neither character exhibit qualities that would make you root for them not to wind up alone. All in all, it’s a film that apparently takes place in New York, but not a New York you’ve ever seen. —HW

The Dark Knight Rises

Here’s the thing: I knew I would hate this. But I had to see it, because to completely avoid the movie blockbuster of the summer would prove my own ineptitude at being a blogger. (And, as a blogger, it is my duty to share my opinions.) Christopher Nolan finally wrapped up his dour Batman trilogy with an overwrought political epic complete with as many of The Christopher Nolan Players as possible. Christian Bale brooding? Check. Tom Hardy being gay-question-mark? Yup. Marion Cotilliard for no particular reason? Uh huh. And leave it to Nolan to even strip away all the fun from Catwoman, who, as played by Anne Hathaway, is more like an old, unenthused tabby who only occasionally gets to ride some stupidly overdesigned motorcycle. Don’t get me started on the fact that it took a good forty-five minutes for Batman to actually show up; it was less of a superhero movie and more of a chance for Christopher Nolan and co-writer/brother Jonathan to an Oscar-clip monologue to every single character. —TC

The Paperboy

I don’t know why I expected more from the guy who interpolated shots of incestuous rape with images of bacon sizzling on a griddle in Precious, but I can say without wavering that The Paperboy was not just my least favorite film of the year—it’s also the worst movie I’ve ever seen. I’m all for a piece of well-made trash, but no amount of scrubbing would reveal a diamond under those layers and layers of shit. It’s misogynistic, homophobic, exploitative all around, and relies on the popular opinion that the South is a cesspool of murder, rape, racism, alligators—things that can only take place down there. And something must be said when Macy Gray delivers the best performance in a cast made up of Zac Efron, Nicole Kidman, Matthew McConaughey, John Cusack, and Scott Glenn. —TC

A Play of Light & Dark In New Footage From Park Chan-Wook’s ‘Stoker’

So a promo video about the creation of a movie poster may not sound like a particularly exciting premise, but when it’s paired with new footage from Stoker, the anticipated upcoming film from Oldboy director Park Chan-Wook, more ears start to perk up (and the poster itself is excellent too, definitely worthy of a closer look). Empire has released a clip featuring scenes with the sort of careful and beautiful effort Park has given to his other films.

The clips from Stoker, which will be released in March of 2013 and stars Nicole Kidman, Mia Wasikowska and Matthew Goode, are intertwined with the process of creating the poster, itself a dark, intricate and beautiful piece of art, much like Park’s films. The gnarled, haunted-forest feel of the art fits in with the creepy nature of the film, a horrific tale of a family gone mad (caskets, weeping angels, skeletons in closets). The story centers on, appropriately enough, the Stoker family, whose dark secrets begin to unravel after the death of father Richard (Dermot Mulroney). Further complications arise for his surviving wife, Evelyn (Nicole Kidman) and daughter India (Mia Wasikowska), when mysterious uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode) arrives, leading to infatuation, infighting and one very unsettling image of a freezer. Watch the video, as well as an earlier trailer for Stoker released back in October, below. 

Park Chan-wook’s ‘Stoker’ Promises To Be At Least As Disturbing As ‘Oldboy’

South Korean director Park Chan-wook is known for his Vengance Triology, a beautiful but frankly brutal exploration of the goriest, most singularly fucked-up methods and motives for revenge. Oldboy in particular is just…like feeling all your guts drop out of you. (Audition may still be the most physically sickening horror film to come out of Asia, but psychologically Oldboy is right up there.) Will Stoker, Park’s first English language film, make us squirm as much?

As of 2010, Stoker’s screenplay, written by Wentworth Miller under a nom de plume, was considered one of the 10 best unproduced scripts circulating Hollywood. So we might assume the studios were just a teensy bit afraid of it. And while the U.S. trailer doesn’t hint at anything special—an especially tense family drama with supernatural elements, perhaps—the U.K. version hits a magnificently creepy swagger (assisted by Death in Vegas’ “Dirge”) and doesn’t relent:

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As of now it looks like a bit of a mashup between </span><i style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; ">Hamlet</i><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; "> and </span><i style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; ">Lolita</i><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; ">, with the mysterious father-killing uncle gaining the sexually charged trust of the moody, grieving teenager. And Nicole Kidman’s Gertrude is caught all weepy in the middle. THEN: BLOOD AND MORE KILLING. Very prettily framed, of course. A sumptuous feast for the psychopath in each of us. Because everyone has one, right? </span><i style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; ">Right</i><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; ">?</span></p> <p>  </p> <p>  </p> <p></p> </cke:object>

Nicole Kidman Gets Sexual in ‘The Paperboy’—But Refused to Say the N-Word

The Paperboy, the new film from Precious director Lee Daniels, is a searing, character-driven thriller set in the southern Florida backwater, and features some dirty, smoldering, and messily spot-on performances from Matthew McConaughey, Zac Efron, John Cusack, and Macy Gray (yes, even Macy Gray). But it’s Nicole Kidman’s sexed-up performance as a desperate woman trying to prove her husband’s innocence and release him from death row. Last night Kidman was honored at the New York Film Festival where The Paperboy, which opens in limited release on Friday, was screened for an eager audience. We caught up with the actress to discuss the film, how far she slipped into character, and her affinity for white patent-leather high heels.

How did you find your way into the character? How did you even begin to imagine her?
Well, I just thought, “Thishas to be authentic.” And I really needed to find my way in. So Lee said, “You should meet with some of these women that I know.” You know, women that were in love with men in prison and were sort of obsessed with them. I met with five different women that Lee had arranged, and that was how I kind of found my way in. At one point I freaked out to myself, and I thought, “This isn’t me. I’m not going to be authentic in this role!” One of the ladies said, “No, you can, you go, girl!” And she kind of gave me the confidence. Then I kind of just let it flow out of me, and I sort of went with it. I didn’t censor myself in any way—I just went straight into the character. And I didn’t see her as crazy, because I see very few people as crazy, so…[Laughs]

But, for me playing her, she’s a woman who is very damaged and is terrified of intimacy and of being close with someone. I suppose, the way in which she deals with Zac’s character, she knows he’s following her around like a puppy dog, but at the same time she’s not going to ruin him. Because if she lets him really fall in love with her, and if she lets herself, in some way, give in to him, and softens towards him, she’s going to ruin his life forever. What she says to him—“You don’t want me. Trust me…”—that, to me, is unconditional love. And her destiny, she feels, is that kind of like with [her husband]. That’s where she’s headed. It’s almost like a death wish. For me, that’s tragic, it’s very sad. And that’s where I came from with her—I had a lot of compassion for her. The reason I wouldn’t step in and out of the accent and the character the whole time was because I felt like I was going to be judging her. And if I just kind of stayed in it, I was very much, I thought, incredibly free to follow the instincts that were there. Which is how Lee works. You come on set and nothing is blocked out; Lee’s just sort of like, “Show it to me!” I never spoke to John Cusack through the shoot as “John.” It was always in character. At the end of the film, he came to my trailer and said, “Hi, I’m John!”

Are there physical things that you did? Like thinking about the hair, the walk?
Well, Lee was obsessed with the butt! He wanted my butt to be bigger, and I was like, “Okay, I can do that!” And I think that physically, I just wanted to find the sexuality of her. The director also triggers things that can ignite emotions and other things for you. And I think for me, the freedom of her sexuality was really important, and from the point I was in Lee’s hands, I didn’t really want to be saying “no” to anything.

Wasthere anything you actually refused to do in this provocative film?
Not really! No, yes, there was one thing: saying the n-word. I just didn’t feel like it was right for the character. And obviously, I have a son who is African-American. It just wasn’t right. The other thing I try to do as an actor is fulfill a director’s vision—that’s what you’re hired to do. And I have opinions and ideas, and I’m there to stimulate, hopefully, and ignite things in the director. But, at the same time, I’m not there to stop him. I really try, with every director,never to pull them off their vision. You’re there as a muse sometimes, you’re there as their conduit, and you’re there to create a character—together.

Can you talk about your character’s “Swamp Barbie” look?
Limitations are a great thing. There was no budget for the wardrobe. Everything was so authentic, and the costume designer was fantastic. I walked in there, and there were those white shoes! Lee has a thing about shoes! And as soon as we scuffed them, I was like, “These are the perfect shoes!” And after that, we just started trying stuff on, and Poloroiding and showing to him, and he would say, “Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!” The costumes were really from that time period, and found down in New Orleans. Lee said I was also going to have to do my own hair and make-up, because we couldn’t afford a make-up artist! And I was of like, “Oh, God!” But I just went into the bathroom, and did the mascara and thick eyeliner like that, and put on this hairpiece that I had.

The important part of being an actor is learning not to shut down, not to say no, and being completely free and open. As you get older, you get a little more frightened—particularly now in this day and age, you know, there aren’t many opinions. It just makes me think, “Screw this!” I just want to push through it, and never stop myself from being brave and fighting through my own insecurities. I want to be in places I’ve never been to before and feel discomfort at times, and feel challenged, and feel ripped open. And it’s very, very hard to find those roles. It’s very hard to find those people that are going to do them with you. I do not want to get to an age, at this point in my life, where I am scared, or running scared. I much prefer to be pushing through the next few decades, giving it all I’ve got.