Honey Galore, No Stings Attached: Catskills Bee Fest Beckons

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This much is true: honey is good for you. It’s rich in antioxidants (especially buckwheat honey), it’s beneficial to the skin, and it can lower triglycerides which is healthy for the heart. Oh, and it tastes great slathered on toast or in a pot of thick Greek yoghurt. But as everyone knows, bees are in trouble, and need our help.

A rise in the popularity of beekeeping has been welcome news for our most beloved pollinator, but keeping hives in the city has drawbacks: a study of honey harvested from urban bees in Vancouver showed trace elements of heavy metals, including cadmium, copper, lead, arsenic and zinc. Meanwhile, in a recent story in The New York Times, a Cornell University professor, Scott McArt, specializing in pollination, told of a study of Manhattan bees communicating to their fellow pollinators that the best pollen could be found not in the flower troughs and parks of New York, but across the Hudson River in New Jersey’s meadows.

We recommend that humans follow the instincts of the bees and cross the river, and then keep going through New Jersey, and all the way up the Delaware Valley to Narrowsburg, the beekeeping capital of New York – which hosts its 4th annual Honey Bee Fest on Saturday, September 22. With the region’s abundant forest canopy, apple orchards, and rich tradition in organic farming, plus the diverse riverside flora, there’s little risk of accidentally covering your English muffins with pesticides or heavy metals when you indulge in the local honey.

The one-day festival take place in the heart of this beautiful river town that has emerged as a favorite destination for New Yorkers, thanks to its location on the Delaware River, several excellent restaurants, boutique homeware stores, and specialist shops including Narrowsburg Proper, a food emporium that sources regional and international gourmet products. It’s also owned by Joan Santo, the creator of Honey Bee Fest.

With a new luxury bus service to Narrowsburg, operated by Catskill Carriage (departing NYC at 4pm on Fridays; tickets $55 each way if booked five days ahead), and plenty of Air BnB options, why not make a weekend of it? In addition to a street fair on Main Street featuring honey vendors, mead tastings, beekeeping classes and cooking demos, there will a special performance by the Wallenpaupack Marching Band, dressed as bees.

With honey bees in decline, expect to hear a vibrant rendition of the Bee Gees “Stayin’ Alive,” among other numbers. And then book dinner and brunch at The Laundrette and The Heron, two Narrowsburg mainstays that could easily hold their own with the best of New York City. Honey is guaranteed to be on the menu.

10 Unforgettable Met Gala Moments Throughout the Years

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Cher at the 1974 Met Gala in custom Bob Mackie; photo courtesy Ron Galella/WireImage

 

Today is the Met Gala — but you already knew that. With this year’s theme as “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination,” we’re anticipating a lot of vintage McQueen, probably some Gaultier, and of course, a hell of a lot of Dolce & Gabbana.

So, to prepare, we’ve put together a list of of the 10 most memorable past Met Gala moments.

 

Rihanna in Guo Pei

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

You can’t have a Met Gala roundup without mentioning Rihanna’s infamous dress from 2015. That year, the theme was “China: Through the Looking Glass,” and Rih chose Chinese designer Guo Pei for her look. The handmade gown took over 2 years for the designer to make and instantly made her go viral. In fact, there’s currently a new documentary that highlights Pei’s impressive career.

 

Rihanna, again, in Comme des Garçons

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images
Queen Rih also made the list because of her Comme des Garçons F/W ’16 look for the Met Gala last year. The theme actually was Comme des Garçons and Rih was one of the only people who actually wore something by Kawakubo — partly, I think, because she’s one of the only people who could really pull it off.

 

Cher in Bob Mackie

 

photo courtesy of WireImage

 

Cher always looks iconic. But it was this custom Bob Mackie gown at the third annnual Met Ball, that set the tone for it to be one of the most fashionable nights of the year. The theme was “Romantic and Glamorous Hollywood Design,” so the singer essentially could’ve shown up naked and — oh wait, she basically did.

 

Katy Perry in Maison Martin Margiela

 

photo courtesy of Margiela
Who could forget Katy Perry’s look from last year’s Met Gala? I know she can’t, because she still talks about how hard it was for her to pee. But beauty is pain, ladies and gentlemen — especially in custom Maison Martin Margiela (that looked suspiciously like Givenchy F/W ’17).

 

Sarah Jessica Parker in Alexander McQueen

 

photo courtesy of Vogue

 

“Anglomania” was the theme in 2006, and Sarah Jessica Parker went full on with the plaid, natch. On the arm of Alexander McQueen, the duo wore custom “Anarchy in the U.K.”-inspired looks by the designer, himself.

 

Lil Kim in god knows what

 

photo courtesy of WireImage

 

No one ever really knows what Lil Kim is wearing, and the 1999 Met Gala was no exception. The Hard Core rapper opted for a pink fur trench, pink snakeskin boots and a pink bikini — and no, the theme was not “pink.”

 

Kate Moss in custom Marc Jacobs and a Stephen Jones turban

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

In 2009, Kate Moss looked the total part for the Met Gala’s “Model As Muse” in a custom Marc Jacobs gold lamé mini, YSL pumps and Stephen Jones turban.

 

Liv Tyler & Stella McCartney in matching halter tops

 

photo courtesy of Mari Sarai/Getty Images

 

Sure, the Met Gala wasn’t as big of a deal fashion-wise in 1999 as it now. But halter tops? Liv Tyler and Stella McCartney, you both know better. Still, the duo really leaned in to the “Rock Style” theme with matching “Rock Royalty” tank tops.

 

Donatella Versace in Versace

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

Donatella’s leather Versace look for the 1996 Met Gala was iconic for a couple of reasons: Sadly, this would be Gianni’s last Gala before his death, but also the debut of his bondage-inspired style that would become a trademark for the legendary brand.

 

Jaden Smith and his ponytail in Louis Vuitton

 

photo courtesy of Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

 

Last but not least, Jaden Smith at last year’s Gala. Yes, the theme was Comme des Garçons, and sure, Rei Kawakubo is known for getting a little avant-garde sometimes. But Jaden Smith took things to a whole different level when he showed up on the red carpet in head-to-toe Louis Vuitton, carrying his recently cut dread locks.

 

Fingers crossed he — and everyone else — leaves the gross accessories at home tonight. Though, the theme is Catholicism, so I’m guessing this year’s top trapping will be guilt.

 

10 Must-See Artists at Frieze New York 2018

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Kapwani Kiwanga, ‘Pink-Blue,’ 2017, photo courtesy of Frieze

 

It’s the first week of May which, of course, means The Met Gala. But it also means the New York edition of the annual Frieze art fair. Opening tomorrow, the high-profile art schmooze will bring together work from over 1,000 established and emerging talents, on view through May 6.

And because we at BlackBook are always here to tell you what to do, we’ve put together a list of the 10 must-see artists at Frieze New York 2018.

 

Imran Qureshi at Nature Morte

 

‘This Leprous Brightness,’ 2011, photo courtesy of Nature Morte
Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi employs various mediums, including painting, installation art and video, to explore the political climate of the Middle East. Juxtaposing violent splatters with precise strokes, he invokes a sort of controlled chaos that reflects his feelings towards his country’s current state.

 

Isa Genzken at Hauser & Wirth

 

‘Untitled,’ 2012, photo courtesy of Hauser & Wirth
Sculptor and installation artist Isa Genzken has worked for over 40 years. Using a variety of materials, including wood, concrete and textiles, the Berlin-based artist explores consumerism and the relationships between high and low brow.

 

Ana Mazzei at Galeria Jaqueline Martins

 

‘Garden,’ 2017, photo courtesy of Galeria Jaqueline Martins
Brazilian artist Ana Mazzei creates minimalist sculpture installations that explore perception and the limits of reality. Often working with painted linen, the 38-year-old builds subtle yet powerful scenescapes inspired by philosophers Paulo Freire and Augusto Boal.

 

Jordan Nassar at Anat Ebgi

 

‘The sun like you is covered with flowers,’ 2017, photo courtesy of the artist
New York artist Jordan Nassar creates hand-embroidered pieces inspired by traditional Palestinian works. Using bold colors and a highly skilled technical practice, he explores the intersections of identity, technology, language and craft.

 

Jordan Wolfson at David Zwirner

 

Still from ‘Riverboat Song,’ 2017-18, photo courtesy of David Zwirner
Multimedia artist Jordan Wolfson uses photography, film, installation and sculpture to create cutting social commentary on violence and entertainment. With his own animated characters, the New York City-born Wolfson creates subversive narrative pieces that join appropriated images and found objects with his original work.

 

Farhad Moshiri at The Third Line

 

‘Top of the World,’ 2011, photo courtesy of The Third Line
Artist Farhad Moshiri uses Pop Art paintings to explore the relationship between his Iranian heritage and the customs he adopted growing up in a Western culture. Using vivid colors and unorthodox materials (like the plastic pearls in the work above), he juxtaposes traditional techniques with images of popular culture.

 

Artur Lescher at Nara Roesler

 

‘Inabsência,’ 2012, photo courtesy of Nara Roesler
Sculptor Artur Lescher creates large-scale pieces that are both artfully designed and architecturally sound. Through a wide range of materials, the Brazilian artist crafts modern masterpieces that challenge perception and form.

 

Judith Bernstein at Paul Kasmin

 

‘Money Shot – Green,’ 2016, photo courtesy of Paul Kasmin
Artist Judith Bernstein has had an extensive career drawing dicks. Mixing pop art with phalluses, the New York-based painter creates colorful canvases that are both overtly political and unapologetically feminist.

 

Rosemary Laing at Galerie Lelong

 

‘Rose of Australia,’ 2017, photo courtesy of Galerie Lelong & Co., New York
Australian photographer Rosemary Laing creates conceptual and surrealist images that capture her subjects without digital enhancement. Photographing staged scenes, the photographer often explores the political, social and cultural trends in her native Australia.

 

Kapwani Kiwanga curated by Adrienne Edwards for the Frieze Artist Award

 

‘The Sun Never Sets,’ 2017, courtesy of Frieze
The winner of this year’s Frieze Artist Award, Kapwani Kiwanga is a Canadian installation artist whose work often examines colonialism and its impact on contemporary identity. At this year’s fair, she will debut an open-air installation that “explores freedom of movement and architectures of exclusion,” titled ‘Shady.’

 

So, if you don’t already have your tickets, you can buy them here.

 

10 Artists You Have To See At This Year’s Armory Show

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Nam June Paik, ‘Megatron Matrix’, photo courtesy of Ryan Somma

 

The Armory is basically the Coachella of the art world – well, sans the ecstasy and the floral headbands. But anyone who’s anyone (or has ever been at some point in time) will gather at Piers 92 and 94 in Manhattan to browse New York’s largest art fair and see work from both emerging and legendary global artists.

Since that can be a bit overwhelming, we’ve done you a solid and put together a list of 10 artists you won’t want to miss at this year’s show. Trust us.

 

Douglas Coupland at Daniel Faria

 

‘Tsunami Chest,’ 2017, photo courtesy of Daniel Faria Gallery

 

Postmodern artist and fiction author Douglas Coupland is known for subverting pop culture and military imagery, in part due to his time growing up in a military family throughout the Cold War. Fascinated by Andy Warhol and the whole Pop Art movement, Coupland explores the darker side of popular culture through installation and sculpture.

Gilbert & George at Ropac

 

‘Beardache,’ 2016, photo courtesy of the artist

 

Collaborative art duo Gilbert & George are known for their highly formalized performance art practice, as well as their, um, not so formal photography work. Their ongoing photo series, referred to as The Pictures, features large scale back-lit images of everything from skinheads to semen, and a whole lot of beards.

 

Kyle Meyer at Yossi Milo

 

From ‘Interwoven,’ 2017, photo courtesy of the artist

 

Kyle Meyer is a photographer, sculptor and mixed media artist who uses digital photography and a variety of handmade techniques, such as weaving, to explore connectivity in the digital age. For his series, Interwoven, Meyer hand-wove over photographs to celebrate flamboyance, homosexuality and femme-identifying men in a hyper-masculine culture.

 

Cammie Staros at Shulamit Nazarian

 

‘All Quiver and Shake,’ 2017, photo courtesy of the artist

 

Sculptor Camme Staros creates handmade objects that juxtapose modernism with antiquity and craft. Joining traditional materials like clay and ceramics with modern details like neon and steel, Staros examines the “semiotic systems” that have been “created and reinforced throughout art history.”

 

Etel Adnan at Gallery Continua

 

‘Five Senses for One Death,’ 1969, photo courtesy of the artist

 

Lebanese-American poet, writer and painter Etel Adnan crafts abstract oil paintings and landscapes inspired by Japanese leporellos that extend into space “like free-hand drawings.” In 2014, Adnan’s work was also included in the Whitney Biennial.

 

Nam June Paik at Gagosian

 

‘Lion,’ 2005, photo courtesy of Gagosian

 

Probably the most exciting artist on this list (at least for us), Nam June Paik is credited with being the founder of video art. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Paik began his career as a musician as part of the Fluxus movement in 1960. After moving to New York in 1964, he began experimenting with film, combining his musical works with video sculptures constructed of wire and metal. Before his death in 2006, Paik was known as an early adopter of technology, including his famous robots built of out multiple computers. In fact, he’s also credited with using the term “electronic super highway” as early as 1974. Damn.

 

Alicja Kwade at i8 Gallery

 

‘Computer (Power Mac),’ 2017, photo courtesy of i8 Gallery

 

Polish artist Alicja Kwade works in sculpture, installation, photography and film. Throughout all of her work, however, she likes to play with value systems, transforming useless materials like wood or glass into high value pieces of art.

 

Jinshi Zhu at Pearl Lam

 

‘A Tiger Shaped Tally,’ 2016, photo courtesy of Pearl Lam Gallery

 

Painter Jinshi Zhu creates abstract oil paintings focused on texture, through endless layers of color and paint. Inspired by the German Expressionist movement and their unconventional techniques, Zhu often creates these layers using a spatula or shovel.

 

The Haas Brothers at R & Company

 

‘Socrata Floor Lamps and Furries’, photo courtesy of the artists

 

Twins Nikolai and Simon Haas have worked in pretty much every medium, from music and film to installation and visual art. Now focused mostly on their sculpture and installation work, The Haas Brothers highlight themes including sexuality, science fiction, psychedelia and politics.

Jeffrey Gibson at Roberts Projects

 

‘Power Power Power,’ 2017, photo courtesy of Roberts Projects

 

Artist Jeffrey Gibson relates his experience as a Native American growing up in a Western culture into large scale paintings and woven sculpture. Also inspired by dance and movement, from pow-wows to nightclubs and the work of Leigh Bowery, Gibson examines nostalgia, heritage and pre-colonized Native American life.

 

Oh, and if looking at all this great art makes you hungry, check out our guide to The Armory’s pop-up restaurants.

 

Anthony Bourdain, Mario Batali Launch 2016 EAT (RED) Culinary Tour

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Mario Batali, Courtesy EAT (RED)

 

If you could eat well and save lives at once, you could hardly say no, could you?

To that end, this year’s edition of the highly anticipated EAT (RED) kicks off June 2 in New York, with the (RED) Supper at Battery Park City’s Brookfield Place, hosted by those ubiquitous, globe-trotting celeb chefs Mario Batali and Anthony Bourdain. Other participating a-list culinary talent for the night will include Dominique Ansel, Frank Falcinelli, Nancy Silverton, Tom Douglas, Vinny Dotolo, Angela Dimayuga, Kristen Kish and Kevin Gillespie.

The overall goal? To raise money for the ongoing (RED) #86AIDS effort, by means of 27 days of edible nirvana. Indeed, the “tour” continues through the 28th, with special dinner, lunch, brunch, happy hour or cocktail events and offerings by many of the world’s hottest epicurean gods and goddesses at their exalted, signature restaurants.

Bourdain_CNN1[1] Eat Red

Anthony Bourdain (Courtesy CNN)

To name but a few: Enrique Olivera at Mexico City’s Eno, Stephanie Izard at Chicago’s Little Goat Diner, Jason Wass at London’s Polpetto, April Bloomfield at NYC’s Spotted Pig, Thomas Keller at the Las Vegas and Beverly Hills Bouchon Bakery locations, Alice Waters at Berkeley’s Chez Panisse, Jose Andres at DC’s Jaleo, as well as Batali and Lidia Bastianich’s own B&BHG Vegas restaurants at the Venetian/Palazzo, including B&B, OTTO Enoteca & Pizzeria and Carnevino Italian Steakhouse—with scores of delectable options to choose from in two dozen cities across four continents.

“Anyone who has ever worked in a kitchen knows that the sum of our efforts always far exceeds what we can do individually,” says Batali. “EAT (RED) is an opportunity for all of our restaurants to collectively contribute to a tremendously worthy cause while doing what we do best: making delicious food.”

LeftBank_GnocciGnocchi at Left Bank NYC, Courtesy EAT (RED)

The (RED) charity, of course, was founded by Bono in 2006, with The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria as its primary recipient. EAT (RED) debuted in 2014, and has become one of its most high-profile annual events. N.B. Plan to reserve in advance. It’s a hot ticket.


Goodnight Mr. Lewis: Will Fleet Week Save Us From Ourselves?

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Photos via Fine Young Man productions

The drone of the tattoo gun was a sexy background music to polite conversation. Hipsters, tastemakers and painted ladies enjoyed wonderful concoctions of Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum, while cute sailor boys mingled. One young lad wearing the whitest uniform ever designed turned to the older mariner and lamented, “Chief, I’d love to get a tattoo, but I live with my mother when I’m done.” The older seaman barked at him, saying, “Get it where she won’t see it,” and headed toward the free BBQ.

It was Fleet Week at its best as “The City That Never Sleeps” embraced seaman from all over the world. An old joke wonders about how long Popeye and Bluto have been at sea. It must have been a long time, it goes, because they immediately get it on with a no holds bar fight over what has to be the ugliest gal in the world, Olive Oyl.

At The Sailor Jerry Home Base, open until the 29th, there were no fisticuffs as the boys in white were on their best behavior. They called all the women, “Ma’am,” and all the men, “Sir,” as they hobnobbed with the likes of Rock Photographer Mick Rock, and artists Buff Monster and Hanksy. The free BBQ from Daisy Mays, haircuts from Frank’s Chop Shop and tattoos from Three Kings were provided to thank them for their service.


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You see, Sailor Jerry was a real dude—Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins was in the Navy back in the day before he took the art of tattooing to a different level. I wear his tattoo flash all over my body. It grounds me in old world values and speaks of a time when honor was more important than life itself. Now good ol’ Norman wasn’t what these days we might consider a “perfect” guy. His political views put him a bit to the right of Attila the Hun, but he sure created some classic tattoos. I got one yesterday, a sparrow, which in the old days meant I had traveled 5,000 nautical miles. I may not have done that, but I have been lost at sea and shipwrecked a few times without leaving this island.

As we walked down the streets of the sanitized Times Square it hit me how NYC has changed. Years ago, the sailors would have flocked to the center of our universe looking for love in all the wrong places. Now they just ogle and politely smile. All the politeness is so confusing to me. My daily regime is polka dotted with rudeness and bitter arguments, as this election year seems to have turned us all against each other . Lifelong friends fight over candidate’s shortcomings, as political leanings turn into seemingly religious arguments. On the dating sites I occasionally peruse looking for love in all the wrong places, potential hookups want to know in advance if you stand with this guy or that gal. I can’t imagine, imagining any of the candidates in the bedroom. The campaigns have made all of us idiots in the eyes of those with opposing views. Facebook is a battleground.

Fleet Week and all the polite warriors that have been washed up on our shores have brought us a different set of rules of engagement. Some of us may disagree with the politics of Navies and the military, but there is little argument that these boys and girls in white are standing tall for all of us.

This Sunday everybody’s favorite bad boy from The Walking Dead, Daryl himself, Norman Reedus, will ride up on a custom built Sailor Jerry Harley and make a guest appearance to toast to the troops for all their hard work at the Sailor Jerry Block Party, featuring Cage the Elephant at Hudson River Park’s Pier 84, 12 Avenue and 44th Street. Mr. Reedus will be showing love to the visiting swabbies. I suggest we all bury the hatchets and show them love, too. (Tickets available, here)

Elton John To Auction Off Rare Warhol, Basquiat Collaboration

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Photo via Sotheby’s

After a chance meeting in a New York cafe in 1980, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol went on to conspire on several significant works, until the latter’s untimely death in 1987. One such painting, simply Untitled, will go on the block at the Sotheby’s Paris French Evening sale on June 7.

The current owner of the rather poignantly foreboding artwork (Jean-Michel himself died in 1988), a 1984-1985 acrylic, silkscreen and oil on canvas, signed by both artists on the overlap, is Sir Elton John, along with husband David Furnish. Described as a memento mori—meaning, a cultural reminder of mortality and death’s inevitability—it strikingly exhibits the artistic/psychological frisson and tension that existed between Warhol and Basquiat.

It is expected to fetch upwards of $1,000,000, and the proceeds will likely go to one of the singer’s charitable concerns. Indeed, he and Sotheby’s have a collaborative history of selling off pieces to benefit the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

 

The Row to Open Three-Floor Flagship Store in New York

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Photo via Vogue

Though New Yorkers Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen established The Row’s first flagship store in Los Angeles, it was never their initial intention to move west. A few years back, the two had their sights set on a three-story townhouse at 17 East 71st Street in the Upper East Side, but the preferred location wasn’t yet available. Focused and patient, fashion’s most aloof twins have finally locked in the coveted space with official plans to open The Row’s first New York store.

“This store is coming from two sets of eyes with the same mentality,” Mary-Kate told Vogueexplaining how intimacy and collaboration are at the core of The Row’s brand ethos. While Los Angeles’ store was designed around mid-century homes—glass, water and tress—intimacy, here, manifests as a reflection of New York. “We wanted the store to very much feel like a home—that’s sort of the dream of here: a brownstone in New York,” Ashley added.

Unknown-3Photos via Vogue

With help from French interior designer Jacques Grange, who’s previously worked with Yves Saint Laurent and Valentino, The Row’s New York flagship will be a reflection of the Olsens’ relaxed, elegant collections, dotted with special items, like a Frank Lloyd Wright mirror, Carlo Bugatti chair and Masa Takayama ceramics. Framed by the townhouse’s buttery, neutral color palette, The Row’s new home looks absolutely timeless.

“It was really important for us that when you walk into the store it wasn’t about clothes being shoved in your face,” Ashley said, highlighting the importance of designing a calm, relaxing environment for customers to slowly introduce themselves to the clothes.  “Less is more, I believe.”

New York Celebrates The Whitney’s One-Year Anniversary in Lower Manhattan

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Photos Courtesy: BFA/Zach Hilty

After leaving its longtime Upper East Side home in 2014, New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art relocated and reopened to Lower Manhattan in May of last year. Following a successful 365-day run in its new Meatpacking District home, the venerated Museum celebrated its one-year anniversary last night with a Studio Party, presented by Louis Vuitton.

The evening event honored Robert J. Hurst, who led the Whitney’s Board of Trustees throughout the Museum’s construction as the chair of the capital campaign. To commemorate Hurst, the Museum’s first floor filled with special guests—iconic photorealist Chuck Close, among them—as everyone sipped custom cocktails and enjoyed small bites.

Zen Freeman and Chelsea Leyland delivered DJ sets, as the crowd lounged in spaces designed by international furniture brand Roche Bobois and received temporary tattoos by Flatlands exhibition artists Nina Chanel Abney, Mathew Cerletty and Jamian Juliano-Villain, as well as Mirror Cells exhibition artists Liz Craft, Elizabeth Jaeger and Maggie Lee.


The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party