Memorial Tribute to Musician and Graffiti Artist Ana Bender This Weekend

Late-night romps can be cruel after you have done in it for decades. Today’s sunlight is lashing me awake and I haven’t the strength to wash the evening out of my hair. Hotel Chantelle was absolutely off the hook last night, with Sam Valentine, Michael Tee, Miss Guy, and Michael Cavadias and a slew of others whipping the crowd into a frenzy. I think the weather had something to do with it as well. The early spring brings flowers early and confusion into club circles. When it’s nice, the places are packed, but when the weather returns to form and a cold rain requires clothes that have been packed away till next year, the hordes stay home. This Sunday, the two-hour premier of Mad Men will hurt Sunday club ambitions.

After memorial tributes in San Francisco and Seattle for Ana Dyson aka ANA BENDER aka AYBEE, NYC gets its turn. White posters pasted on walls that hipsters pass announced the memorial, which will start at 7pm MARCH 25 at Legion, 790 Metropolitan Avenue. It’s a free show. The posters were produced by Ana’s friend Katsu. This comes from the 12ozProphet website:
"RIP ANA BENDER
 
4/26/1987 – 2/2/2012
 
Ana Dyson aka ANA BENDER aka AYBEE
 
Was an influential musician and graffiti artist from Seattle that lived in NYC and SF.
 
She was known for her raw and pure punk/folk music style as well as her graffiti tags “AYBEE”.
 
AYBEE was a close friend of the BTM graffiti crew both on the west and east coasts.
 
She lived in New York City for a time.
 
She lived in SF for a time.
 
A free event is happening this Sunday."
There will be performances by JAPANTHER, Soft Dov, Brohammer, and Dead Reich and DJs Maxwell 57, NineLives, The Cat, Grace of Spades, Ella, and Chloe.
 
Tonight I will attend a very special affair that is hush hush, super duper, uber secret and I have sworn to only speak of it come Monday. It’s one of these "show up on a corner late-night and you will be led to it’" events.
 
Twenty years ago I would have thought I was being whacked. I can’t offer you more today; my body is upset at my brain for the insults of last night. My brain needs to turn itself off for a couple of hours. It asks for your forgiveness. I got the usual, "Don’t you ever sleep?" from the waitstaff at Kellogg’s Diner at 6am. They had seen me for breakfast 20 hours earlier. I replied with my usual: "I’ll get all the sleep I need in 20 or 30 years." I realized over my eggs that I started saying that 15 years ago.  

Annie Lennox

Activitst, Humanitarian, Greatest White Soul Singer Alive.

Annie Lennox may have possessed a voice of a thousand angels on steroids, but she was at her most powerful when she gave a voice to others.

As part of the hugely successful 80s British synth-pop duo Eurythmics, she was named “The Greatest White Soul Singer Alive” by VH1 and was listed in The 100 Greatest Singers of All Time by Rolling Stone magazine. Her recordings, both as a solo artist and as part of Eurythmics, sold over 80 million records worldwide, cementing her place in British Rock Royalty.

[expand title=”READ +”]Who would’ve imagined that this economically challenged, scrawny shy girl who studied classical music at The Royal Academy of Music in London, would have rocked the world in so many ways. The stylishly androgenous diva can now add political activist, humanitarian and philanthropist to her CV.

Sweet dreams are made of this…


Who am I to disagree?


I travel the world


And the seven seas

Everybody’s looking for something.

From ‘Sweet Dreams (are made of this)’.

Apart from helping save countless lives with her HIV/AIDS work in Africa, Lennox campaigned tirelessly for the release of one of 21st century’s most elegant and brave humans, Burma’s Aung San Suu Kyi. (Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s democracy leader and Nobel Peace laureate spent 15 years under house arrest and was finally released on 13th November 2010).

Annie Lennox was awarded an OBE (Order of the British Empire) in 2010 for her tireless work in fighting AIDS and poverty in Africa. All this, in one lifetime, whilst looking fabulously original throughout.

Text by Howard Collinge- The Unique Creatures 

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Klaus Nomi

Intergalactic Space Punk Opera singer

It wasn’t only his space-punk-waiter look that mesmerized people, it was his beautiful otherworldly voice. Klaus Nomi, a trained opera singer from Germany, fell to earth in the late 1970s, landing in New York at a time where disco was dying or at least needed to be killed.

Like most artists of the day, he began waiting tables to pay the rent. But after late night shifts, he would belt out stunning arias for the tired staff. News of the impromptu space operas spread and Nomi soon landed a gig at Irving Plaza’s New Wave Vaudeville show, where freakishness was de rigueur. A promotional flyer at the time advertised for “acts like Egyptian slaves, B-girl hostesses, robot monsters, geeks…and emotional cripples”. Klaus had found his home.

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It was here that Klaus Nomi debuted an outfit that a late-night news reporter would describe as a “Weimar tuxedo spaced out in future shock.” But time and again, it was Nomi’s falsetto voice that out-shocked his physical presence. So much so, an announcer would often come on stage to remind the audience that his singing was real.

Nomi’s amazing act spread when David Bowie, the original frontier spaceman, used Nomi as a back-up singer on a Saturday Night Live show in 1979. (Bowie wore a Tristan Tzara-inspired tuxedo that closely resembled what would become Nomi’s signature look). The universe suddenly expanded and Nomi found himself performing alongside New York’s most beautiful vagrants, artists and musicians, which at times included Joey Arias, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, John Sex and Kenny Scharf.

After releasing just two albums, “Klaus Nomi” and “Simple Man,” he became one of the world’s first celebrities to die of AIDS. 1n 1983, at just 39, his ashes were rocketed into the sky and scattered over New York City.

Text by Howard Collinge 

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