Admiring Nick Jonas at Yesterday’s Nightclub Disrupt Panel, Lit’s 10th Anniversary Next Wednesday

When I used to spend my time in woodsy places like Yellowstone or Yosemite, I learned that when confronted by a large toothy, clawed animal, the last thing you do is try to run away, as that animal can surely out-run you; the running triggers a hunter/prey response and they instinctively attack. This is my excuse –  the only one I have –  for being very Steve Lewis at the Nightclub Disrupt Panel at the Dominion Theatre yesterday. The other panelists Michael Gogel, Steven Rojas, and Mick Boogie triggered my predator instincts when they started using terms like VIP to describe a bozo with a black card. Mick Boogie, to a lesser degree – he was just being charming. My canines came out and, well, the rest will soon be posted online and I’ll let you see it then. Moderator Vikas Sapra said I was fine but he smiles too much to be trusted with this sort of question.

One of the things I was putting out there is that computers are a two-dimensional view of people, often with only the information offered by those people or spending patterns or financial history. This rarely gets to the heart of things and lacks…heart. To the geek world, people are reduced to a much more two-dimensional profile than the one-on-one relationship a potential patron has with a good door person or with an owner or promoter. Their jobs are all about knowing their clientele. No, people: a doorman is not just looking for a pretty face, although that never hurts. A VIP is often a person willing to spend money, but that is not the criteria for any place worth this ink.

Another point I put out there was a VIP at Lavo is not necessarily a VIP at W.i.P. or Lit and vice versa. I feel the internet is only as good as the people feeding it and the people feeding it don’t necessarily understand the dynamics or requirements of each venue. Anyway, a lot was said – probably too much by me – and I’ll post it when I get it.

The previous panel of this Social Media Week gathering consisted of Nick Jonas and a moderator. I listened to him, completely enamored. He is charismatic, bright, handsome, and articulate. He is currently on Broadway. He eeks of stardom. Outside for air during the break, a handful of geeky fans waited with cameras. He posed with them all… experience telling him that running would only trigger a predator/prey response. He made them feel special and won me over.

Last night at Hotel Chantelle, I DJed the opening for one of my favorites: Kelle Calco. When we switched over, I told him I had played "Parachute Woman" by the Rolling Stones as I remember his set being very Stones heavy and didn’t want to subject the crowd to the same song twice. This wasn’t an issue; Kelle has changed. His set went everywhere from electro to hip-hop to rock. He offered up some very commercial pop and made it all work. I was impressed and surprised. I asked him about it and he said he now embraces all types of music and totally gets into it. He told me about all the places he DJs and hosts. He is a busy dude.

I hear that White Noise has only a few Fridays left, which means Sam Valentine’s rock fest will end. Sam says he wont throw a real rock party again till he finds a place with stripper poles. Rock is retreating. Nur Khan lamented the Hiro Ballroom reinvention a couple of days ago and the need for a new rock spot. His The Electric Room is setting the standard for rock purity. Lit remains a bastion of rock chops. It will celebrate its 10th anniversary Wednesday with a list of DJs including Justine D, Leo Fitzpatrick, and me. We’ll each get about a half-hour to showcase our rock and roll Hootchie Koo. The Kelle thing threw me off. Maybe he is right: he public wants a mixed format and so maybe that’s what they get. For me, I’ll stick to my roots. Those other genres of music just trigger my yawn response.

StyleCaster & DJ Mick Boogie Present ‘Sounds From The Front Row: Volume 5’

Last week, social media-powered style platform StyleCaster rolled out another volume of their fashion week inspired mixtape, Sounds From The Front Row. The mix features choice cuts curated by DJ superstar Mick Boogie that are meant to keep you revved up while you dash between shows and venues this NYFW. 

Just like Boogie’s super popular remixes for notables like Jay-Z, Kanye West and Adele, this FW12 volume features a killer lineup of sounds that are worthy of popping in during fashion week and beyond. Click here to see the official playlist that includes artists like Theophilus London, M.I.A., and Lana Del Rey, and download the mix here.

Social Media Week, Nightlife Disrupt Panel, and Tonight’s UPlanMe.com Launch Party

So while most of the free world is in a NYC Fashion Week frenzy, some other folks have stuck in another week. Social Media Week is upon us and apparently I am social media. I know this because my good ol’ friend Michael Gogel and his pal Vikas Sapra have asked me to be on a panel. The Nightlife Disrupt Panel is described as follows:

"The nightlife industry has only recently started to utilize social media tools. Many currently use it to broadcast events, parties, and causes; however, few are harnessing social media’s ability to engage their audience. These digital tools lift the veil from nightlife, increase transparency, and disrupt the role of exclusivity. Will exclusivity be replaced by experience? Will we become content producers – live-streaming our events and big-name DJ sets? How will we adapt to this new environment?"
Disrupt is right. They want me to show up at this thing at 11am. That’s way too early for nightlifers, especially during Fashion Week. I’m going to just stay up and hit up Starbucks, Stumptown, and down a Redbull or three. Redbull is livestreaming the panel so I think I’ll be able to score some. Other panelists include Steven Rojas  – GrandLife Hotels, Social Media Director, Mick Boogie –  MickBoogie.com, DJ, and my boy Michael Gogel: Nightlife Week, PPX World & Permanent Guestlist, Founder. Vikas will moderate. I looked up this Social Media Week thing and found out it’s a big deal taking place in over 20 different cities. I read this:
 
  • "…Reflecting the global impact of social media – and its role as a catalyst in driving cultural, economic, political and social change in developed and emerging markets – Social Media Week is one of the world’s most unique global platforms, offering a series of interconnected activities and conversations around the world on emerging trends in social and mobile media across all major industries. In just under three years, Social Media Week has expanded to 21 cities, including New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, Toronto, Vancouver, Sao Paulo, Rio De Janeiro, Bogotá, Buenos Aires, Mexico City, Istanbul, London, Paris, Rome, Milan, Glasgow, Berlin, Moscow, Beirut, and Hong Kong. Starting in 2012, SMW is adding Tokyo, Singapore, DC and Miami.
  • Annually, SMW attracts more than 60,000 attendees across thousands of individually organized events, with half a million connecting to the conference online and through mobile.
  • “Social Media Week does not disappoint. It is a real-world manifestation of some of the best that new technology has to offer – ideas, strategies and insights shared by the people who are shaping the future” Ellen McGirt, Senior Writer, Fast Company.
  • “Social Media Week is a truly global phenomenon—showcasing borderless brands and communications, via the power of social media. We are proud to have been an integral partner—with PepsiCo employees contributing to discussions and idea exchanges on three continents and there, demonstrating the depth and breadth to which digital media is permeating our company.” Bonin Bough, Global Director of Social and Digital Media for PepsiCo.
I will be there on time for sure but might look a little more disheveled than usual. Michael Gogel tells me he’s about to launch another week-long conference/convention thingy. Let’s hope he doesnt overlap with these two thingy weeks! Please pick another week, Mike, and schedule panels for the late afternoon. I asked him all about it:
"I’ve been working for over a year now planning to launch Nightlife Week in the near future. This panel sets great precedence and a taste for what is to come, and I already know that I would love to have you back with me at that time. Nightlife Week‘s goal is to help build strong localized business to promote commerce and tourism through seven days and nights of on-site and off-site events, seminars, shows, awards, tastings, concerts, cocktail parties, brunches, product launches with a series of deals, discounts, and special offers. There are terrific financial implications for the city, small businesses, and all neighborhoods to promote themselves and grow revenue."
I will attend the UPlanMe.com official public launch event taking place at Pranna, 8-11pm tonight, sponsored by Radeberger, Medea Vodka, and Summerstage with music by Carsonicboom. Founded by Brian Kantor, a former BlackBook sales exec and pal, and produced by other former BlackBook alum and pals Kelly Bruce and Jessica Fafara of the newly formed New Regime Group. UPlanMe is a "social calendar" that takes your social media Likes and auto-populates your calendar with all the events you’d want to know about, based on your interests. Brian is a bon vivant and a treasure to talk to and I love that he’s launching this Uplanme.com thingy.
 
This panel thing might be a big deal. DJ Rekha mentioned it to me as I stopped and chatted with her outside of Peels yesterday. For more info on the panel, here are two websights to check out: SocialMediaWeek.org and Soundctrl.com.
 
There are some other pertinent panels with industry panels also happening the same day which you can find on the websites. The event is tomorrow, Thursday, February 16 at the Dominion Theater, 428 Lafayette Street. Here’s the other stuff that’s going on in case you’ve heard enough from me.
 
10:00am – 10:45am
A Conversation with Nick Jonas, moderated by Jason King
 
11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Nightlife Disrupt: Social Media’s Impact Moderated by Vikas Sapra, DJ and @NYNightlife – Anonymous (virtual panelist)
 
Panelists:
Michael Gogel: Nightlife Week, PPX World & Permanent Guestlist, Founder Steve Lewis – BlackBook Magazine, Nightlife Correspondant Steven Rojas – GrandLife Hotels, Social Media Director Mick Boogie –  MickBoogie.com, DJ
   
1:00pm-2:00pm
SPIN presents: “Music criticism is dead, long live music criticism.”
Can 140-characters do justice to journalism?
Chris Weingarten – Editor, Spin Magazine
 
5:30pm – 6:30pm
Translation Presents Connectivity: Discovering The power of social communities in music Moderated by Marcus Collins, Director of Social Engagement at Translation LLC
 
Panelists include:
Constantine Roussos (dotMUSIC Initiative Leader) Angela Yee (Morning Show Co-Host for Eminem’s Hip-Hop Radio Station on Sirius) David Sonenberg (Owner – DAS Communications) TBA
 
7:00pm -8:00 pm
“I Know The DJ: How Social Media Has Fueled the Explosive Growth Of EDM in America”
Moderated by Zev Norotsky of Elektro Magazine
 
Panelists:
Eddie Dean (President Pacha New York)
Lee Anderson (AM Only)
Laurence Lui (Astralwerks)
Justin Kleinfeld (Rephlektro)
DJ Junior Sanchez
 
8:00pm – 10:00pm
MIXER AND COCKTAILS w/ DJ Performance by Junior Sanchez – presented by Elektro Magazine

4AM DJ Tour Diary: Mick Boogie Does Comic-Con & LA

As a manager and partner at 4AM DJs, I’m always arranging performances, events, and photo shoots around the world. Every day, the reports I get back from my DJs sound like the kinds of wild adventures that I rarely get to be a part of as a desk jockey. The people who flock to these stellar international events get to experience the end result of months of prep, but do they really know what a day in the life of a DJ is like? In this monthly column, you’ll hear first-hand accounts of DJ war stories, with photos and videos from the world’s best to show for it. In this Tour Diary, you’ll read about Mick Boogie as he makes his way to San Diego’s Comic-Con for a celebrity-packed party, and then to LA for one of that town’s legendary daytime jams. Yours truly, Adam Alpert.

Thursday July 21: I landed in San Diego to deejay a party at Comic Con. The party was sponsored by Complex Magazine, and featured celebs like Cowboys and Aliens Jon Favreau—who spun a guest DJ set—and Olivia Munn. When I’m not manning the decks, I’m a huge comic book and graphic novel fan, so checking out the convention was something I’ve always wanted to do. It did not disappoint. Pure. Mayhem.

Friday July 22: I traveled via train from San Diego to LA. If you haven’t taken that train ride, I highly recommend it. 2.5 hours of scenic coastal views made the trip one of the first times I’ve ever travelled and wished it had lasted longer. I arrived in LA at around 3pm, and met my wife (who flew into LAX from NYC that afternoon) to begin our LA experience.

Saturday July 23: I was the featured DJ at one of my favorite clubs in the world, Playhouse. It’s a DJ’s dream: amazing sound, huge stage, insane lightshow, and the energy is intense. Thousands of people are going crazy to the latest house bangers. A big shout out to Igor from Playhouse, who has always supported the Mick Boogie movement.

Sunday July 24: After a night of drunken Euro-rific house madness, my Sunday gig was the complete opposite, and quite possibly the most fun I’ve had DJing in years, at the legendary LA daytime party, the Do-Over. Any deejay who declines an invite here, or says they didn’t have fun, is not a real DJ. This is a music lover’s dream, where you can play anything under the sun, as long as it isn’t the contrived nonsense we have to play 85% of the time everywhere else. A big thanks to Azul and Dominique. Selections from my Do-Over set included about 10 songs produced by J. Dilla, a set of samples from the Tribe Called Quest discography, a Brazilian funk set, some dancehall, and a 70s slowjam grand finale. I would deejay the Do-Over every week if I could. After that, it was back to NYC and the regular grind, but this weekend showed me why Southern California is such an amazing place, and I can’t wait to go back!

image

image

Industry Insiders: DJ Mick Boogie Is ‘Mick at Night’

For DJ Mick Boogie, spinning music for some of the world’s most influential figures is just another job requirement. After securing his MBA, the Ohio native took a pass on the 9-to-5 routine in favor of building his career as an international DJ. With an ever-expanding resume that includes clients from Nike to Red Bull and Jimmy Choo to G-Shock, Mick Boogie’s nights are spent in the booth at exclusive events like LeBron James and Jay-Z’s annual “Two Kings” dinner held during NBA All-Star weekend, and just last month, the New York City resident inked a new management deal with Jay-Z’s Roc Nation label, sending his jet-set lifestyle into full throttle.

On his musical background: I played a lot of instruments growing up, including drums and piano, and in college I taught myself how to DJ as a hobby. I didn’t originally plan on being a DJ, but after getting my MBA I just couldn’t interject myself into the “real” workforce. By that time my DJing was starting to take off on a regional level, so I used my education to advance my career. I’ve always done everything on my own. I’ve always been self-managed, self-marketed, self-promoted.

On the benefits of getting schooled in business: I’ve always had a knack for the marketing side of things, which is why I focused on that in school. In retrospect, I’m glad I did that instead of getting, say, a biology degree. It’s played a huge role in my success, since I’m always thinking about the next step. The connections I’ve made in this game are invaluable, but it’s nice to have a business background because I can DJ just as well as I can face-off in a boardroom.

On his former DJ gig with the Cleveland Cavaliers: It enabled me to develop a great relationship with LeBron James, which has led to amazing things way beyond the scope of us both leaving Cleveland. It was a good stepping stone—I still do a lot of work with him and Nike.

On his favorite DJ gig: Every year I DJ Lebron James and Jay-Z’s annual “Two Kings” dinner at NBA All-Star Weekend and it’s great because it’s not just athletes or rappers, it’s also actors, entrepreneurs, and business moguls. The amount of business and networking that goes on in that room is insane, because that’s kind of the point–when you look around and see Bill Gates talking to LeBron, you wonder, can we move these people a little closer to the DJ Booth? Another highlight is getting to spin great music. Lots of soul samples for Jay and LeBron, and if Mark Cuban is there, I’ll play something from Texas, or for Bill Gates, I might Google some of his favorite songs—I study the people in the room and what they do. On his new management deal with Roc Nation: The ink is still drying, but it’s pretty awesome. They’ve recognized all the solo work I’ve put in over the years, and we’re devising plans to elevate things to an even bigger level. When you look at their client list, from artists like Mark Ronson and Rihanna to DJs like Harley Viera-Newton and D-Nice, they are really killing it. I like to have my hands in multiple projects because nobody wants to DJ forever, but right now, it’s my passion and I’ll be sticking with it for awhile.

On the benefits of self-promotion and life in NYC: Everyone’s career begins on a word-of-mouth level, but the Internet is invaluable when it comes to self-promotion, especially when you come from a small market, like Ohio. One of the greatest things about New York is the opportunities that open up to you outside of the city simply because you live here. You could be the greatest DJ in Antarctica and nobody would give a fuck. But you could be the worst DJ in New York, with a good buzz because of self-promotion and you can get booked all around the world. Fortunately, I happen to have some natural talent and I work hard.

On his unique DJ style: I’m a big fan of merging genres that don’t seem like an obvious fit but actually sound great when you hear them together. The term “mash-up,” however, where you put vocals over just an old beat, I hate. I don’t want to hear Jay-Z over Miley Cryus because that just doesn’t make sense. I’d rather hear Jay-Z over Coldplay because Jay-Z and Chris Martin are good friends, they’ve collaborated, done concerts, and realistically they could do an entire album together and it would actually sound similar to a previous mix I’ve put together. I try to apply that logic to my sets when I DJ.

On his favorite venues to spin: RdV is a dope spot in NYC’s Meatpacking District, with an equally eclectic crowd and music. In Vegas I like Surrender at the Wynn, in Miami LIV is truly an amazing venue, and in Tokyo, a club called Feria. They have something called “The Image Table,” where they position the attractive people above the crowd, so it’s aspirational. It’s kind of funny–and ethically wrong–but in Japanese it’s probably not as literal as “Image Table.” Toyko might be my favorite city to DJ because are so many different music scenes. I once did five nights in a row and every night was different than the last. They have such a unique appreciation for culture because things aren’t oversaturated there.