4 Reasons Ciara Deserves Some More Fashion Credibility

Photo: Madison McGaw/BFAnyc.com

10 years ago, an album simply titled “Goodies” was released that included a plethora of amazing R&B hits and an array of candy colored velour track-suits. Fast forward to 2014, and Ciara is still relevant today– thankfully, she has dropped the matching sweats for pieces that are little bit more couture. Givenchy’s Riccardo Tisci considers her as part of his #family and she’s become a reoccurring figure on the front row scene. One look at her Instagram and you’ll mistake the self-made recording artist for a pampered billionaire’s daughter that mingles with the royals. It’s time for Ciara’s 2005 Teen Vogue cover to finish style school and graduate to Vogue, because lets face it, Ciara is the real deal.

Exhibit A: Front row at Givenchy, wearing Givenchy. David-X-Prutting_BFAnycPhoto: David X Prutting/BFAnyc.com

David-X-PruttingPhoto: David X Prutting/BFAnyc.com

Like any other fashion darling, a front row presence is essential to sealing the deal. Miss Ciara is not too shabby considering she’s sat front row at the Givenchy show multiple years in a row. Her relationship with Givenchy’s Riccardo Tisci is far more than air kisses — he considers her part of his #family. The #family that also includes Vogue cover star Kim Kardashian.

Exhibit B: She’s got Ralph Lauren’s approval. Leandro-Justen_BFAnycPhoto: Leandro Justen/BFAnyc.com Remember when Polo Ralph Lauren projected a fashion show in the middle of New York fashion week in the middle of Central Park on a waterfall? Remember how jealous you were that you weren’t there? Well Ciara was, and she was wearing a custom Polo top, name embossed of course.

Exhibit C: She’s got friends. Matteo-Prandoni_BFAnycPhoto: Matteo Prandoni/BFAnyc.com

Leandra-JustenPhoto: Leandra Justen/BFAnyc.com

Billy-FarrellPhoto: Billy Farrell/BFAnyc.com

Models Joan Smalls and Cara Delevingne, artist Marina Abramovic, jewelry designer Jennifer Fisher, and Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing, just to name a few. Ciara mingles with some of hottest names in fashion and art. They all can’t get enough of her goodies.

Exhibit D: The girl can wear the clothes. Matteo-PrandoniPhoto: Matteo Prandoni/BFAnyc.com

Lets face it, Ciara was blessed with a body of a goddess that any designer would be crazy not to throw gowns at. Ciara can look fresh in a potato sack… which I’m sure Margiela would gladly provide.

CULTURE BLAST: Jemima Kirke Can Paint, Prada Marfa Defacer Found, Marina On Shia

Texas artist admits to defacing the chicest littlest Prada outpost.

Say it isn’t so. Prada Marfa Instagram-takers rejoice, the culprit has allegedly been found. And were giving him exactly what he wanted — publicity!

Student breaks a 19th Century Statue… while taking a selfie. 

Maybe the selfie should reserve mass popularity for the fashion world. When art is involved, you just end up breaking a 19th century Greco-Roman statue.

Polish artist Paweł Althamer creates a blank canvas that’s waiting for your artist touch. 

The last time I was at The New Museum I was scorned upon because I leaned against the wall. Now, come to my surprise, you can draw on the them!

Nymphomaniac star Shia LaBeouf gets reviewed by performance art superstar Marina Abramović

The best of both worlds? In a totally different setting than Disney Channel backlot, Marina weighs in on the “not-famous” actor’s latest antics.

A Look Inside Jemima Kirk’s Art Universe 

Your favorite British rebel on HBO’s “Girls” is an artist of many talents. Not only can Jemima Kirke act like a total fun-drug obsessor on screen, she can also paint. (And it looks like she’s taken some pointers from BFF’s Lena Dunham’s artistic direction — cue the bare breast.)

A Parisian New York family is finally getting back a missing Matisse. 

Looks like fingers are all being pointed at who else, the Nazis.

Gagosian Gallery set to open a pop-up gallery on Delancey Street. 

The Lower East Side just got a little  trendier.

Marina Abramović‎ and William Basinski Inhabit an Eternal Moment (Part IV)

As fearless and ferociously talented as she is seductive and passionate, iconic performance artist Marina Abramović has spent more than forty years challenging herself and engaging audiences with her work. As a pioneer of performance art, she has created some of the most vital early works of the movement, putting her mind and body at the forefront as the medium, and offering herself to her audience no matter the danger. When we spoke to Abramović back in 2012 for the release ofThe Artist is Present—a documentary chronicling her seminal performance exhibition at MoMA—she told us:

I don’t have any personal life so it was not complicated, everything is public and all my work is available to everybody. I show all aspects of myself—fragile, strange, dramatic, kitschy, whatever. And I think being vulnerable, the public can also project their own vulnerability into my persona, which makes them closer to me and I’m closer to them.

And as her most personal work to date, Robert Wilson’s viscerally and visually stunning The Life and Death of Marina Abramović (now onstage at the Park Avenue Armory), re-imagines her remarkable life—from the tortured Yugoslavian childhood of her past and her decades of work as a performance artist to her love affairs and what the future will inevitably bring. Starring Abramović as both herself and her mother, she performs alongside an incredibly athletic Willem Dafoe and bellowing Antony Hegarty. Amalgamating music, theater, sound, design, physical performance, and visual art, the “quasi-opera” encompasses all facets of performance, bringing the audience on a fragmented and abstract immersion into the emotional and psychological landscape of the artist’s extraordinary life.

From the early beginnings of her career, Abramović has used her body as a vehicle for expression—and Wilson’s show, in which she gave him complete freedom to tell her story, is no exception. With her art, she creates a unique dialogue between herself and audience, asking the public to watch as she tests the mental and physical limitations of the human body. She solicits the viewer to participate in the experience, creating a conversation and critique of social norms and boundaries of everyday actions and interactions. Having been raised in former Yugoslavia to militant parents, her childhood was imbued with an incredible sense of discipline and structure which has fueled her abilities as an artist, but also created an extreme emotional distance that has created a deep yearning to love and be loved. And in that great expression of physicality in her work, she manipulates our conception of time, slowing down the clock to embody the notion of time’s illusion to inhabit an eternal moment.

And if there’s any other artist whose work echoes that temporal element, it’s avant-garde electronic composer and master of brilliant sound William Basinski—who collaborated with Wilson, Abramović, and Hegarty to create the powerful music forThe Life and Death of Marina Abramović. As one of the most fascinating composers in the world, he too has been perfecting his craft for decades now. After being greatly inspired by Brian Eno’s melancholic Music for Airports and the work of Steve Reich, Basinski began experimenting, investigating just how far he could go with the tape loops that have now gone on to garner him both the acclaim and following that has been slowly building for over twenty years. His immersive soundscapes drone on and on, shifting your consciousness—stripping bare the artifice of time and allowing you to inhabit that eternal moment. From his early work to The Disintegration Loops and now his work with Abramović, his music lives in an ineffable realm that’s as delicate as it is harrowing and extremely powerful in its absolute beauty—especially heard here upon the stage.

“In the concerts, I usually do one long set because the whole point is to try and get out of this body and this worry and this nonsense and just take a little vacation, fall in. And forty minutes can go by and it feels like five, so that’s the ideal situation. It’s like meditation, you have some relief, you sort of go back into the womb,” he once told me. And although having never met previously to the collaborative experience of the show, Abramović have fallen into a natural simpatico, both in their work and personally.

Now one of the most revered and legendary artists—with a show that immortalizes her career— Abramović took some time while getting her stage makeup done to talk to her dear friend Basinski to discuss the physical and mental limits of expression, inhabiting an eternal moment, and the state of the art world today through their seasoned eyes.

Enjoy Part I,  Part II, and Part III.

Marina Abramović and William Basinski Inhabit an Eternal Moment (Part III)

As fearless and ferociously talented as she is seductive and passionate, iconic performance artist Marina Abramović has spent more than forty years challenging herself and engaging audiences with her work. As a pioneer of performance art, she has created some of the most vital early works of the movement, putting her mind and body at the forefront as the medium, and offering herself to her audience no matter the danger. When we spoke to Abramović back in 2012 for the release ofThe Artist is Present—a documentary chronicling her seminal performance exhibition at MoMA—she told us:

I don’t have any personal life so it was not complicated, everything is public and all my work is available to everybody. I show all aspects of myself—fragile, strange, dramatic, kitschy, whatever. And I think being vulnerable, the public can also project their own vulnerability into my persona, which makes them closer to me and I’m closer to them.

And as her most personal work to date, Robert Wilson’s viscerally and visually stunning The Life and Death of Marina Abramović (now onstage at the Park Avenue Armory), re-imagines her remarkable life—from the tortured Yugoslavian childhood of her past and her decades of work as a performance artist to her love affairs and what the future will inevitably bring. Starring Abramović as both herself and her mother, she performs alongside an incredibly athletic Willem Dafoe and bellowing Antony Hegarty. Amalgamating music, theater, sound, design, physical performance, and visual art, the “quasi-opera” encompasses all facets of performance, bringing the audience on a fragmented and abstract immersion into the emotional and psychological landscape of the artist’s extraordinary life.

From the early beginnings of her career, Abramović has used her body as a vehicle for expression—and Wilson’s show, in which she gave him complete freedom to tell her story, is no exception. With her art, she creates a unique dialogue between herself and audience, asking the public to watch as she tests the mental and physical limitations of the human body. She solicits the viewer to participate in the experience, creating a conversation and critique of social norms and boundaries of everyday actions and interactions. Having been raised in former Yugoslavia to militant parents, her childhood was imbued with an incredible sense of discipline and structure which has fueled her abilities as an artist, but also created an extreme emotional distance that has created a deep yearning to love and be loved. And in that great expression of physicality in her work, she manipulates our conception of time, slowing down the clock to embody the notion of time’s illusion to inhabit an eternal moment.

And if there’s any other artist whose work echoes that temporal element, it’s avant-garde electronic composer and master of brilliant sound William Basinski—who collaborated with Wilson, Abramović, and Hegarty to create the powerful music forThe Life and Death of Marina Abramović. As one of the most fascinating composers in the world, he too has been perfecting his craft for decades now. After being greatly inspired by Brian Eno’s melancholic Music for Airports and the work of Steve Reich, Basinski began experimenting, investigating just how far he could go with the tape loops that have now gone on to garner him both the acclaim and following that has been slowly building for over twenty years. His immersive soundscapes drone on and on, shifting your consciousness—stripping bare the artifice of time and allowing you to inhabit that eternal moment. From his early work to The Disintegration Loops and now his work with Abramović, his music lives in an ineffable realm that’s as delicate as it is harrowing and extremely powerful in its absolute beauty—especially heard here upon the stage.

“In the concerts, I usually do one long set because the whole point is to try and get out of this body and this worry and this nonsense and just take a little vacation, fall in. And forty minutes can go by and it feels like five, so that’s the ideal situation. It’s like meditation, you have some relief, you sort of go back into the womb,” he once told me. And although having never met previously to the collaborative experience of the show, Abramović have fallen into a natural simpatico, both in their work and personally.

Now one of the most revered and legendary artists—with a show that immortalizes her career— Abramović took some time while getting her stage makeup done to talk to her dear friend Basinski to discuss the physical and mental limits of expression, inhabiting an eternal moment, and the state of the art world today through their seasoned eyes.

Check back here for Part III of Marina and William’s conversation tomorrow.

Marina Abramović and William Basinski Inhabit an Eternal Moment (Part II)

As fearless and ferociously talented as she is seductive and passionate, iconic performance artist Marina Abramović has spent more than forty years challenging herself and engaging audiences with her work. As a pioneer of performance art, she has created some of the most vital early works of the movement, putting her mind and body at the forefront as the medium, and offering herself to her audience no matter the danger. When we spoke to Abramović back in 2012 for the release ofThe Artist is Present—a documentary chronicling her seminal performance exhibition at MoMA—she told us:

I don’t have any personal life so it was not complicated, everything is public and all my work is available to everybody. I show all aspects of myself—fragile, strange, dramatic, kitschy, whatever. And I think being vulnerable, the public can also project their own vulnerability into my persona, which makes them closer to me and I’m closer to them.

And as her most personal work to date, Robert Wilson’s viscerally and visually stunning The Life and Death of Marina Abramović (now onstage at the Park Avenue Armory), re-imagines her remarkable life—from the tortured Yugoslavian childhood of her past and her decades of work as a performance artist to her love affairs and what the future will inevitably bring. Starring Abramović as both herself and her mother, she performs alongside an incredibly athletic Willem Dafoe and bellowing Antony Hegarty. Amalgamating music, theater, sound, design, physical performance, and visual art, the “quasi-opera” encompasses all facets of performance, bringing the audience on a fragmented and abstract immersion into the emotional and psychological landscape of the artist’s extraordinary life.

From the early beginnings of her career, Abramović has used her body as a vehicle for expression—and Wilson’s show, in which she gave him complete freedom to tell her story, is no exception. With her art, she creates a unique dialogue between herself and audience, asking the public to watch as she tests the mental and physical limitations of the human body. She solicits the viewer to participate in the experience, creating a conversation and critique of social norms and boundaries of everyday actions and interactions. Having been raised in former Yugoslavia to militant parents, her childhood was imbued with an incredible sense of discipline and structure which has fueled her abilities as an artist, but also created an extreme emotional distance that has created a deep yearning to love and be loved. And in that great expression of physicality in her work, she manipulates our conception of time, slowing down the clock to embody the notion of time’s illusion to inhabit an eternal moment.

And if there’s any other artist whose work echoes that temporal element, it’s avant-garde electronic composer and master of brilliant sound William Basinski—who collaborated with Wilson, Abramović, and Hegarty to create the powerful music forThe Life and Death of Marina Abramović. As one of the most fascinating composers in the world, he too has been perfecting his craft for decades now. After being greatly inspired by Brian Eno’s melancholic Music for Airports and the work of Steve Reich, Basinski began experimenting, investigating just how far he could go with the tape loops that have now gone on to garner him both the acclaim and following that has been slowly building for over twenty years. His immersive soundscapes drone on and on, shifting your consciousness—stripping bare the artifice of time and allowing you to inhabit that eternal moment. From his early work to The Disintegration Loops and now his work with Abramović, his music lives in an ineffable realm that’s as delicate as it is harrowing and extremely powerful in its absolute beauty—especially heard here upon the stage.

“In the concerts, I usually do one long set because the whole point is to try and get out of this body and this worry and this nonsense and just take a little vacation, fall in. And forty minutes can go by and it feels like five, so that’s the ideal situation. It’s like meditation, you have some relief, you sort of go back into the womb,” he once told me. And although having never met previously to the collaborative experience of the show, Abramović have fallen into a natural simpatico, both in their work and personally.

Now one of the most revered and legendary artists—with a show that immortalizes her career— Abramović took some time while getting her stage makeup done to talk to her dear friend Basinski to discuss the physical and mental limits of expression, inhabiting an eternal moment, and the state of the art world today through their seasoned eyes.

Check back here for Part III of Marina and William’s conversation tomorrow.

Marina Abramović‎ and William Basinski Inhabit an Eternal Moment

As fearless and ferociously talented as she is seductive and passionate, iconic performance artist Marina Abramović has spent more than forty years challenging herself and engaging audiences with her work. As a pioneer of performance art, she has created some of the most vital early works of the movement, putting her mind and body at the forefront as the medium, and offering herself to her audience no matter the danger. When we spoke to Abramović back in 2012 for the release of The Artist is Present—a documentary chronicling her seminal performance exhibition at MoMA—she told us:

I don’t have any personal life so it was not complicated, everything is public and all my work is available to everybody. I show all aspects of myself—fragile, strange, dramatic, kitschy, whatever. And I think being vulnerable, the public can also project their own vulnerability into my persona, which makes them closer to me and I’m closer to them.

And as her most personal work to date, Robert Wilson’s viscerally and visually stunning The Life and Death of Marina Abramović (now onstage at the Park Avenue Armory), re-imagines her remarkable life—from the tortured Yugoslavian childhood of her past and her decades of work as a performance artist to her love affairs and what the future will inevitably bring. Starring Abramović as both herself and her mother, she performs alongside an incredibly athletic Willem Dafoe and bellowing Antony Hegarty. Amalgamating music, theater, sound, design, physical performance, and visual art, the “quasi-opera” encompasses all facets of performance, bringing the audience on a fragmented and abstract immersion into the emotional and psychological landscape of the artist’s extraordinary life.

From the early beginnings of her career, Abramović has used her body as a vehicle for expression—and Wilson’s show, in which she gave him complete freedom to tell her story, is no exception. With her art, she creates a unique dialogue between herself and audience, asking the public to watch as she tests the mental and physical limitations of the human body. She solicits the viewer to participate in the experience, creating a conversation and critique of social norms and boundaries of everyday actions and interactions. Having been raised in former Yugoslavia to militant parents, her childhood was imbued with an incredible sense of discipline and structure which has fueled her abilities as an artist, but also created an extreme emotional distance that has created a deep yearning to love and be loved. And in that great expression of physicality in her work, she manipulates our conception of time, slowing down the clock to embody the notion of time’s illusion to inhabit an eternal moment.

And if there’s any other artist whose work echoes that temporal element, it’s avant-garde electronic composer and master of brilliant sound William Basinski—who collaborated with Wilson, Abramović, and Hegarty to create the powerful music for The Life and Death of Marina Abramović. As one of the most fascinating composers in the world, he too has been perfecting his craft for decades now. After being greatly inspired by Brian Eno’s melancholic Music for Airports and the work of Steve Reich, Basinski began experimenting, investigating just how far he could go with the tape loops that have now gone on to garner him both the acclaim and following that has been slowly building for over twenty years. His immersive soundscapes drone on and on, shifting your consciousness—stripping bare the artifice of time and allowing you to inhabit that eternal moment. From his early work to The Disintegration Loops and now his work with Abramović, his music lives in an ineffable realm that’s as delicate as it is harrowing and extremely powerful in its absolute beauty—especially heard here upon the stage.

“In the concerts, I usually do one long set because the whole point is to try and get out of this body and this worry and this nonsense and just take a little vacation, fall in. And forty minutes can go by and it feels like five, so that’s the ideal situation. It’s like meditation, you have some relief, you sort of go back into the womb,” he once told me. And although having never met previously to the collaborative experience of the show, Abramović have fallen into a natural simpatico, both in their work and personally.

Now one of the most revered and legendary artists—with a show that immortalizes her career— Abramović took some time while getting her stage makeup done to talk to her dear friend Basinski to discuss the physical and mental limits of expression, inhabiting an eternal moment, and the state of the art world today through their seasoned eyes.

Check back here for Part II of Marina and William’s conversation tomorrow.

Lisa Kirk Reimagines Marina Abramovic as the Grim Reaper

Artist Lisa Kirk has previously created a perfume that embodies the idea of Revolution. (It smells of “tear gas, blood, urine, smoke, burned rubber, body odor, and more…”) She’s staged an interactive public protest as part of the Performa Biennial, and this month, she opens an exhibition at Invisible Exports on the Lower East Side that promises to be just as wild. It will include a variety of works, including rusted rainbow, the oxidized-metal-paint-on-paper piece pictured above. But my attention was really piqued by an aside in the press release: “…there will be a special 24-hour durational performance featuring Marina Abramović as the Grim Reaper.” Now what, exactly, would that entail?

“So far, the performance involves a phantom Marina embodying the Grim Reaper,” explains Kirk, who is still working out the kinks. “She will be brooding, pacing, and drinking my collaborative chakra healing elixirs with Rawpothecary for 24 hours during the final weekend of the show, January 25 – 26. There will be some interaction with the audience and a possible standoff with a body double.” (Rawpothecary is a New York-based juice company that the artist is working with to conjure “custom elixir prescriptions…[that] aim to help improve your emotional, spiritual, and physical health.”)

It’s a bit unclear if Kirk plans to conscript the actual Abramovic for her performance—perhaps Marina will have some free time after her autobiographical opera concludes its December 12—21 run at the Park Avenue Armory?

Regardless, it’s the idea of Marina Abramovic that has inspired the artist.  “The piece is born as a reaction to the accelerating intensity of consumerism, urban decadence, and the hyper-inflated superego in today’s practically post-apocalyptic world,” Kirk says. “Marina, for me, represents the transformation of pop culture’s newly revived interest in, and the devouring of, conceptual and performance art as celebrity. She is a perfect icon for this new narrative. When I read about her performance with Lady Gaga, both ‘engrossed’ in separating rice from lentils as a meditative practice, I couldn’t help but be appalled by their naïveté, self-indulgence, and insensitivity regarding the art historical precedents that Marina, herself, was a part of. Perhaps it’s a bit of cynicism, but there are child laborers who live and work in horrible conditions, doing that very thing, all over the world. Their general lack of awareness and blind privilege inspired me. Truth be told, I love Marina’s work and as a post-feminist she’s integral to that art historical trajectory. I admire the courage she displayed in her practice, but her unabashed admiration for celebrity just confounds me.”

Part of Kirk’s conflicted opinion has to do with the money issues artists face. “Young artists today have to begin with enormous capital: to go to school, incur debt, and then work and build their practice. Survival alone is nearly impossible. The celebrity-cum-artist distorts the reality of the life of an artist. Marina, and people like her, are both powerful and irresponsible, so I felt compelled to re-imagine her as the ‘death of art.’”

Kirk’s exhibition—which includes sculptures, works on paper, copper-plated Cheetos, and other works without any direct link to Marina Abramovic—is on view at Invisible Exports from December 13—January 26. The 24-hour “durational performance” featuring Marina-as-Grim-Reaper will take place January 25—26. And the real Marina Abramovic is currently starring in The Life and Death of Marina Abramovic at the Park Avenue Armory, December 12—21.

Unique Creatures: Marina Abramovic – Givenchy Addict and Sometime Nudist

Performance artist Marina Abramovic has not one, but two signature looks: a floor-length, often all black, high-necked gowns—and nothing at all. She’s perhaps better known for the second—stripping down to a brazenly womanly birthday suit to confront such bold issues as the feminist identity, the limitations of the human body, the reproductions of radical loss, contagious narcissism, and the corruptive influence of easily gifted power in her work. She often invites viewers (and for many years her co-performer and lover Ulay Laysiepen) to inflict harm on her body—wiping her, cutting her, further undressing her, and otherwise manipulating her bare figure in such works as “Rhythm O;” sometimes her vulnerability is expressed through nudity alone. When she does wear dress herself in her work, she often makes the clothes herself—as in the case of her most famous piece, 2010’s epic MoMa endeavor, The Artist is Present. Here, Abramovic sat still in the museum for over 700 hours (sans bathroom breaks, movement, food), staring at visitors. It was a compelling piece–and one of the most viewed (over 750,000 visitors waited for hours to see the artist) in MoMa history. With The Artist is Present, radical performance art entered the mainstream and was legitimized.

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The Wonder of William Basinski

In the cyclical nature of existence, eventually everything decays and dies. Even the most beautiful of artifacts begin to decompose and wither. But inside that atrophy, something else is born and therein lives an eternal moment. It’s not only a death rattle but the space between time, a place lingering forever that collects in the particles that live and perish. And for decades now, master of entrancing sound, William Basinski has been creating sonic worlds that inhabit this ineffable eternal moment.

His music lives inside the words you can’t gather, the feelings that rest between your bones, and the quiet that possess you in the night. As delicate and utterly stunning as it is harrowing and skin-tingling, to listen to Basinski’s work is a sensory and emotional experience. His melancholic loops drone on and on, floating through you and capturing you in the essence of a place beyond articulation. The sounds wrest on your chest like heartbreak but fill you with a elation so wonderful that it consumes you and you never want it to stop.

Over the past few years or so, I’ve had the great pleasure of getting to know William and luxuriating in his music that’s become like a dear friend—but it wasn’t until this past weekend that I finally got to see him perform his magic live. In honor of ISSUE Project Room’s 10th anniversary, he played a show cast in darkness, and as I’d always imagined, it was truly magical. Opening with Nocturnes—a piano and tape composition—the room went silent as we all floated down in the abyss of his haunting loops. Moving onto the otherworldly sensations of his Variations, the second half of his set was just as gorgeous but not quite as dark, evoking images of the neo-classical painting slowly chipping away with grace. The elasticity of time is never more evident than in his soundscapes, which transport you into a meditative sphere that’s difficult to shake even after the lights go reemerge. But to share the experience and to be shroud in darkness with his sound booming overhead is something that is so essential to the wonder of what he does.

Whether its his beloved Disintegration Loops, his Variations, his Melancholia, or the music he created for The Life and Death of Marina Abramovic—which arrives in New York this December—there’s always a reason to take a moment to close your eyes, sink into a moment, and appreciate the fantastical nature of his music. So after such a marveling performance—whether you’re familiar with his brilliance or not—take a moment to bask through some Basinski. Your mind and heart will feel so much better for it.

d|p 1.1

Vivian & Ondine

Static Nocturne

http://youtu.be/ybe5di9h4ro

Watermusic

http://youtu.be/DQAEkaTkbNg

Melancholia

Nocturnes

http://youtu.be/rRTRq2X9H70

The Garden of Brokenness 

Hymns of Oblivion

Silent Night

El Camino Real

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