Runway Rundown: All The Best From Spring ’19 Ready-to-Wear, Resort and Fall ’18 Couture

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Valentino Fall ’18 Couture

 

A lot has happened on the runway over the last few weeks. There was Paris Couture Week; before that, some designers showed their Spring ’19 collections; and in between all of those, there was Resort (which we don’t usually care for, but this season had one great moment). So, we don’t blame you if you’ve missed some things. And because we love you, we’re going to be your fashion fairy godmothers, and round up everything you need to see if you haven’t already (and if you have, all of the amazing things you should look at again). Below, our favorite runway moments — or, as we like to call them, the only ones worth mentioning.

 

Spring ’19 Ready-to-Wear:

Spring can be really boring. I mean, florals, for Spring? Groundbreaking. No, but seriously, it can really hard to re-invent the wheel when that wheel is a limited range of flowing skirts, mini dresses and caftans. That’s why our favorite brands threw out seasonal rules altogether and did things like patent leather and hoodies.

 

Alyx

 

For Matthew Williamson’s first ever runway show for his four-year-old brand Alyx (or, as its named now, 1017 Alyx 9SM for Williamson’s birthday and the location of his first studio at 9 Saint Marks), the designer went all out. Instead of debuting a ton of cliche Spring pieces, like bathing suits and floral dresses, the collection looked almost as if it could’ve been for Fall. With a post-apocalyptic vibe perfect for our current political climate, Willliamson’s pieces looked like a uniform for, albeit incredibly fashionable, anti-fascist soldiers. Sign me up.

 

Vetements

 

VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2019

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VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2019 – WATCH THE OFFICIAL VIDEO – LINK IN THE PROFILE

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VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2019

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For fashion world darling Demna Gvasalia’s turn on the runway, the designer paid homage to his home country, Georgia. Gvasalia casted the show with all Georgian teenagers, and took the opportunity to teach fashion insiders about the current political turmoil happening in the region. In fact, each piece from the collection comes with a giant bar code, that once scanned with your iPhone, will open an app that features facts about the country. And as much as I want to hate Vetements, I wish I could afford to pay $1,000 for a sweatshirt.

 

Kenzo

 

Prints, prints, prints. #KENZOSS19

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Kenzo S/S ’19 was all about prints. Gingham, checks, polka-dots, snakeskin — you name it, Carol Lim and Humberto Leon designed it, and styled it together. The whole maximalist, should-be-clashing-but-instead-looks amazing thing has always been Kenzo’s vibe, but each season Lim and Leon seem to do it better and better. After last year’s Spring collection, I really thought the brand had reached their peak, but this season even makes me want to wear color.

 


 

Resort:

Honestly, I shouldn’t have even included Resort on this list, since it’s really not a list – it’s just Miu Miu.

 

Miu Miu

 

If Miu Miu’s Resort ’19 collection was bad, it truly wouldn’t have even mattered. With a casting like the one they had at The Regina Hotel in Paris last week, including Rowan Blanchard, Kaia Gerber, Uma Thurman, Chloe Sevigny and Naomi Campbell, no one would have even noticed the clothes. But we did, because the collection was perfect. Kind of preppy, but with a race car driver-meets-Valley of the Dolls-meets-Maui sort of look, the Miu Miu collection was what Miuccia Prada still does best, even after all these years: it was fun, it was free, and somehow, between all the clashing prints and furry heels, it was still subtle.

 


 

Fall ’18 Couture:

Couture is all about fantasy; it’s about staring at beautiful clothes you desperately want but have absolutely nowhere to wear them to. When it came to this year’s Couture Week, our favorite designers didn’t let us down, delivering some of the dreamiest collections we’ve ever seen grace the runway. I mean, Kaia Gerber at Valentino. Enough said. But don’t worry, we’ll say more anyway.

 

Chanel

 

For his Fall ’18 Chanel couture show, Karl Lagerfeld paid homage to Paris. Honestly, everything the guy does is good, and the fact that he’s still able to send tweed two-pieces down the runway, and make them look good — well, that alone, proves he’s a genius. In addition to his love of Paris, the designer built this collection around what he calls the “high profile” — long skirts that unzip to show thigh-bearing minis underneath. “You can wear it zipped down when you visit your banker, no?” he told Vogue. “And zipped up when you see your lover after!”

 

Valentino

 

At this point, there’s no way you haven’t seen at least one photo from the Valentino couture show. Images of Kaia Gerber in her amazing beehive have literally been flooding the internet. But for once, the talk is true and all the hype is worth it. The Valentino collection was the MVP of Couture Week — and maybe all of 2018. Obviously, Pat McGrath and Guido Palau killed it with the beauty; but the collection itself was completely breathtaking. I mean, the models looked like actual angels floating down the runway in their billowy gowns and floral headdresses.

 

Fendi

 

 

Fendi always knows what they’re doing. For their couture collection, the brand took a step back from the logomania that’s taken over their last few seasons, and created a ’60s-inspired ode to fur. While a lot of the industry has vowed to go fur free, Lagerfeld has doubled down with Fendi. Though the collection included bits of actual fur, it was more about the ways in which he treated other fabrics that created a sort of gaudy (but in a good way), glam feel that I totally could’ve imaged Liz Taylor or Anne Welles in.

 

Margiela

 

Discover highlights from our Autumn-Winter 2018 ‘Artisanal’ Collection designed by @jgalliano: The nomadic idea of taking life on the road is conveyed in abundant layering where garments interweave and mutate. #maisonmargiela #artisanal #artisanalartistry – Music: “Unchained Melody” Written By: Alex North & Hy Zaret Courtesy Unchained Melody Publishing LLC – Black Saturn, Nicholas Hill, Luciano Ugo Rossi, Glenn Herweijer; Ben Sumner. KPM Music When The Clock Stops, Nikky French. KPM Music Breakacuda,Benjamin Medcalf. Anger Music Circus Caravan MYMA. Justement Music Flight Remembered, Nicholas Hill, Glen Herweijer, Ben Sumner. KPM Music The Arrival, David James Caton, Harry Valentine. Anger Music Etude in e major, Frederic Chopin, Tolga Kashif, KPM Music Warhammer, Darren Mudge. Anger Music Arrangement : Jeremy Healy

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Galliano went all Fifth Element for his latest Margiela Artisanal collection (he’s too cool for couture, natch). Using VR headsets and iPhones as accessories, the designer sent a retro-futuristic, technology-obsessed collection down the runway. And hey, since people are already attached to their phones, physically adhering them to our outfits seems like a natural next step. That, or we’re going to war with aliens and Galliano is designing the outfits.

 

Viktor and Rolf

 

To celebrate their 25 years together, Viktor & Rolf decided to take 25 of the brand’s most iconic looks, and update them for their Fall ’18 couture collection. That update meant turning everything white and covering them in Swarovski crystals. Though I’ve always been a fan of Viktor & Rolf, there’s literally nothing more perfect than the bed dresses they originally created for their Fall ’05 collection — or, at least, I thought, until I saw this season’s iteration, complete with white bedazzled pillows and a down evening dress. Sigh. This is what dreams are made of.

 

Photos & Video: Instagram

10 Unforgettable Met Gala Moments Throughout the Years

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Cher at the 1974 Met Gala in custom Bob Mackie; photo courtesy Ron Galella/WireImage

 

Today is the Met Gala — but you already knew that. With this year’s theme as “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination,” we’re anticipating a lot of vintage McQueen, probably some Gaultier, and of course, a hell of a lot of Dolce & Gabbana.

So, to prepare, we’ve put together a list of of the 10 most memorable past Met Gala moments.

 

Rihanna in Guo Pei

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

You can’t have a Met Gala roundup without mentioning Rihanna’s infamous dress from 2015. That year, the theme was “China: Through the Looking Glass,” and Rih chose Chinese designer Guo Pei for her look. The handmade gown took over 2 years for the designer to make and instantly made her go viral. In fact, there’s currently a new documentary that highlights Pei’s impressive career.

 

Rihanna, again, in Comme des Garçons

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images
Queen Rih also made the list because of her Comme des Garçons F/W ’16 look for the Met Gala last year. The theme actually was Comme des Garçons and Rih was one of the only people who actually wore something by Kawakubo — partly, I think, because she’s one of the only people who could really pull it off.

 

Cher in Bob Mackie

 

photo courtesy of WireImage

 

Cher always looks iconic. But it was this custom Bob Mackie gown at the third annnual Met Ball, that set the tone for it to be one of the most fashionable nights of the year. The theme was “Romantic and Glamorous Hollywood Design,” so the singer essentially could’ve shown up naked and — oh wait, she basically did.

 

Katy Perry in Maison Martin Margiela

 

photo courtesy of Margiela
Who could forget Katy Perry’s look from last year’s Met Gala? I know she can’t, because she still talks about how hard it was for her to pee. But beauty is pain, ladies and gentlemen — especially in custom Maison Martin Margiela (that looked suspiciously like Givenchy F/W ’17).

 

Sarah Jessica Parker in Alexander McQueen

 

photo courtesy of Vogue

 

“Anglomania” was the theme in 2006, and Sarah Jessica Parker went full on with the plaid, natch. On the arm of Alexander McQueen, the duo wore custom “Anarchy in the U.K.”-inspired looks by the designer, himself.

 

Lil Kim in god knows what

 

photo courtesy of WireImage

 

No one ever really knows what Lil Kim is wearing, and the 1999 Met Gala was no exception. The Hard Core rapper opted for a pink fur trench, pink snakeskin boots and a pink bikini — and no, the theme was not “pink.”

 

Kate Moss in custom Marc Jacobs and a Stephen Jones turban

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

In 2009, Kate Moss looked the total part for the Met Gala’s “Model As Muse” in a custom Marc Jacobs gold lamé mini, YSL pumps and Stephen Jones turban.

 

Liv Tyler & Stella McCartney in matching halter tops

 

photo courtesy of Mari Sarai/Getty Images

 

Sure, the Met Gala wasn’t as big of a deal fashion-wise in 1999 as it now. But halter tops? Liv Tyler and Stella McCartney, you both know better. Still, the duo really leaned in to the “Rock Style” theme with matching “Rock Royalty” tank tops.

 

Donatella Versace in Versace

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

Donatella’s leather Versace look for the 1996 Met Gala was iconic for a couple of reasons: Sadly, this would be Gianni’s last Gala before his death, but also the debut of his bondage-inspired style that would become a trademark for the legendary brand.

 

Jaden Smith and his ponytail in Louis Vuitton

 

photo courtesy of Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

 

Last but not least, Jaden Smith at last year’s Gala. Yes, the theme was Comme des Garçons, and sure, Rei Kawakubo is known for getting a little avant-garde sometimes. But Jaden Smith took things to a whole different level when he showed up on the red carpet in head-to-toe Louis Vuitton, carrying his recently cut dread locks.

 

Fingers crossed he — and everyone else — leaves the gross accessories at home tonight. Though, the theme is Catholicism, so I’m guessing this year’s top trapping will be guilt.

 

Resurrection Summons Fashion Gods With New Retail Store

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Photography: Alexander Thompson

In 1996, Mark Haddawy and Katy Rodriguez founded Resurrection, a retail archive that would become one the world’s premiere international venues for collectible and historic clothing. With locations in both Los Angeles and New York, Resurrection has attracted high fashion icons including Prince, Catherine Denueve, Lou Lou De la Falaise, Azzedine Alaia, Iman, John Galliano and Chloe Sevigny—not to mention Kate Moss, who Rodriguez cites as their longest running, most loyal client.

“Kate Moss came into the store on our first day 20 years ago,” she said. “She will always hold a special place in our hearts and history.  She embodies our generation’s curious take of high and low fashion and everything in between.”

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Alexander McQueen Dogtooth Cocoon Coat (2009), Alexander McQueen Sarabande Lace Gown (2007), Alexander McQueen Runway Gown (2008)

With a new location on Great Jones, Resurrection opens its doors to celebrate a brand new, custom retail gallery and archive. In addition to their vast inventory of vintage pieces from fashion gods like Christian Lacroix, Gaultier and Moschino, Haddawy and Rodriguez are celebrating three specific archive collections in their new space.

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It begins with a selection of rare 20th century, out-of-print books showcased on custom Brian Thoreen brass shelves, moves on to Bulgari Jewelry (including the company’s famous Tubas watches) and finishes with a pupil dilating curation of Alexander McQueen pieces.

“It’s really special,” Rodriguez said. “The collection spans McQueen’s career from our perspective. We love the early pieces as much as the very famous later collections. He was such a unique force.  It’s been an important reminder of what great is.”

Later this month, Resurrection will showcase a rare collection of Maison Martin Margiela and in September, will debut a Helmut Lang show—stay tuned.


Resurrection, 45 Great Jones Street, is open Monday – Saturday from 11 AM – 7 PM.

John Galliano Debuts a Wild Couture Collection for Maison Margiela

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Maison Margiela Spring 2015 Couture illustrated by Joseph Larkowsky

When Anna Wintour first stepped out at the British Fashion Awards in December in the first gown John Galliano designed under his new appointment as creative director of Margiela, the fashion world wrinkled their collective nose and shrugged their shoulders a little. I mean, yes, very pleasant. Lovely black floor length number with swirling floral detail, an almost mimic of a Galliano dress Wintour has worn previously from his Fall 1995 collection under his eponymous label. But for a world preview of what is to come, it was, by any standards, a tad mundane.

Cut to Monday afternoon in London. With tension building, and after the shocking news that Galliano would be showing there instead of the traditional French capital during the official Couture season in a few weeks, the fashion elite gathered for what turned out to be a complete barrage of ideas, intrigue, illusion, and amazing craziness.

Galliano was known during his previous employment for his extravagance, glamour, beauty, and eye for creating red carpet ready ball gowns for any Hollywood A-Lister. Margiela however, is not known for its Hollywood affiliation, but its constant play on the essence of fashion, fabric manipulation, frivolity, and raw ideas.

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It seems Galliano took advantage of this and really experimented with basically anything the designer and team could find. This was plainly explained by the first look, a beige paneled waistcoat outlined with sprayed black toy cars, racing around the neckline, pockets, and hem. Models wore two tone tights, with matching shoes sporting sculpted heels.

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Red made a prominent appearance, in skirts teamed with tiger skin jackets, a column halter dress and a 3D embroidered frock-coat and ball gown, the former covered in sprayed cabochons and seashells depicting a tribal Schiaparelli-esque face, the latter strewn with a golden bullion bib, and an eclectic mix of…stuff teamed with a golden scull mask, reminiscent of the Roman Catacomb Saints.

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Galliano’s trademarks raised their iconic heads. His affiliation and constant reinvention of the 1920/’30s saw the light in a scalloped fringe and loose, cropped opera coats, as well as the golden glittering hair caps, as well as bias cut skirts and sheer tulle appliqué gowns. He also touched on some of the ideas the House of Margiela had done previously; stonewash and black denim hot pants made an appearance, as well as a selection of masculine black suits, some double breasted, some encased in a tufty shrug of black hair.

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This collection is still in its early stages; it’s been a while since we have seen such passion and interest in design, and especially couture. It is a grower, and it does require a closer look for anyone who may be skeptical. The details, the ideas, and the execution are all phenomenal, as blatant or as quietly concealed as they may be. It will definitely be a collection to remember.

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As for where to go from here, I’m really not sure. Galliano quickly becomes a master wherever he is. He harbors the passion and talent to apply it to any scenario, blatantly seen during his one season stint at Oscar de la Renta. His aesthetic and own personal style and taste will always follow him, and it will always be something his avid followers want to see. Whether the appointment at Margiela will be a long term fix, we don’t know, but as an initial mark-making exercise on the current consumer driven face of fashion, it was indeed more one made with a spray-can instead of a fine-tipped pen.

Collection images courtesy of Maison Margiela

John Galliano Headed to Margiela?

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The rumor mill is swirling with talk of what would be a pretty remarkable second chance for John Galliano who made a very ungraceful exit from Dior circa 2011 after a drunken anti-semitic rant caught on tape.

If however, rumors that he will take the helm at Maison Martin Margiela, are true, perhaps Galliano, who has said that he feels his best designs are still within him, might be able to redeem himself in the fashion world, if not through his words, then through his work. Renzo Rosso (founder of Diesel) has not confirmed the appointment, but did say, “Who wouldn’t like to work with him? If he ever got back his name, I would be the first to produce his collections.” Margiela would be the first big name at Margiela since Margiela himself left in 2002. The house remains very highly-regarded for it’s modern, avant-garde styles, and would undoubtedly be a major point of re-entry for Galliano.

Why Don’t You Go As A Louis Vuitton Bag?

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In case you didn’t get your fill of Halloween festivities this past weekend, since the ghoulish night falls on a Thursday the costumes and candies last almost two weeks this year. If you’re still searching for dress-up inspiration or need another transformational persona to add to your roster, look to the sittings and parties that are more fantasy than fashion. Photographers like Miles Aldridge, Steven Klein, and David LaChapelle have your back.

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Why don’t you go as a Louis Vuitton bag? Grab a stencil and some body confidence and get to work. Lil’ Kim photographed by David LaChapelle.

image-3You could always go as the creepy, pure girl. Steven Klein photographs Kate Moss as Good Kate for W.

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Bad Kate is an option as well. Here, Moss plays the demon. Pearlescent teeth, mounds of accessories, and horns should do the trick.

image-5Toss the conical bras and lace gloves and try for a different Madonna. Alana Zimmer photographed by Miles Aldridge. For her sickly look, grab the Moroccan oil and some lavender blush.

image-3Always an option: grab a couture Margiela mask and go as Kanye West.

image-4 If pretty is more your thing, go as Natalie Vodianova’s Alice as shot by Annie Leibovitz. A blue dress, some maryjanes, a headband, and a smattering of small furniture should call the adventure to mind.

image-5Reference more than a few historical figures by going as David LaChapelle’s rendering of Amanda Lepore as Andy Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe.

image-6…Or as David LaChapelle’s Amanda Lepore as Andy Warhol’s Liz Taylor.

image-7The ultimate surrealist costume inspiration, courtesy of Baroness Marie-Hélène de Rothschild and Baron Alexis de Redé at their Surrealist Ball in 1972.

Margiela’s Successor Revealed: Nobody

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Ever since rumors started surfacing a few months ago that Martin Margiela was no longer designing the label at which he sat at the helm for over 20 years, the fashion industry was abuzz with talk of a potential successor. The Belgian-born master of conceptual style is one of the most revered avant-garde designers at work today, not to mention the fact that the face behind Maison Martin Margiela has kept his identity a total mystery throughout his ascent in the industry, only adding to his larger-than-life persona. So who is capable of filling Margiela’s vacant shoes? Apparently, no one.

Margiela “will not be replaced at the company, which has been majority owned by the Italian group Diesel since 2002,” says Suzy Menkes in the New York Times. The choice to continue having a team of designers create the collection is a controversial one, although given rumors that Margiela has been planning his exit for seasons and involving himself less and less, there’s a good chance the last few collections could reflect exactly what the fashion community can expect from the brand going forward. That said, Menkes points out, “the designer’s particular vision, which had focused on the authenticity of the vintage artisan fused with modern photo prints depicting wrinkles or handwork, was missing from recent shows.” Combined with losing the allure of its anonymous founder (a key component in the brand’s cult status), the road ahead may be a rocky one for Maison Martin Margiela in terms of winning over what are sure to be numerous critics.