Runway Rundown: All The Best From Spring ’19 Ready-to-Wear, Resort and Fall ’18 Couture

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Valentino Fall ’18 Couture

 

A lot has happened on the runway over the last few weeks. There was Paris Couture Week; before that, some designers showed their Spring ’19 collections; and in between all of those, there was Resort (which we don’t usually care for, but this season had one great moment). So, we don’t blame you if you’ve missed some things. And because we love you, we’re going to be your fashion fairy godmothers, and round up everything you need to see if you haven’t already (and if you have, all of the amazing things you should look at again). Below, our favorite runway moments — or, as we like to call them, the only ones worth mentioning.

 

Spring ’19 Ready-to-Wear:

Spring can be really boring. I mean, florals, for Spring? Groundbreaking. No, but seriously, it can really hard to re-invent the wheel when that wheel is a limited range of flowing skirts, mini dresses and caftans. That’s why our favorite brands threw out seasonal rules altogether and did things like patent leather and hoodies.

 

Alyx

 

For Matthew Williamson’s first ever runway show for his four-year-old brand Alyx (or, as its named now, 1017 Alyx 9SM for Williamson’s birthday and the location of his first studio at 9 Saint Marks), the designer went all out. Instead of debuting a ton of cliche Spring pieces, like bathing suits and floral dresses, the collection looked almost as if it could’ve been for Fall. With a post-apocalyptic vibe perfect for our current political climate, Willliamson’s pieces looked like a uniform for, albeit incredibly fashionable, anti-fascist soldiers. Sign me up.

 

Vetements

 

VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2019

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VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2019 – WATCH THE OFFICIAL VIDEO – LINK IN THE PROFILE

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VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2019

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For fashion world darling Demna Gvasalia’s turn on the runway, the designer paid homage to his home country, Georgia. Gvasalia casted the show with all Georgian teenagers, and took the opportunity to teach fashion insiders about the current political turmoil happening in the region. In fact, each piece from the collection comes with a giant bar code, that once scanned with your iPhone, will open an app that features facts about the country. And as much as I want to hate Vetements, I wish I could afford to pay $1,000 for a sweatshirt.

 

Kenzo

 

Prints, prints, prints. #KENZOSS19

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Kenzo S/S ’19 was all about prints. Gingham, checks, polka-dots, snakeskin — you name it, Carol Lim and Humberto Leon designed it, and styled it together. The whole maximalist, should-be-clashing-but-instead-looks amazing thing has always been Kenzo’s vibe, but each season Lim and Leon seem to do it better and better. After last year’s Spring collection, I really thought the brand had reached their peak, but this season even makes me want to wear color.

 


 

Resort:

Honestly, I shouldn’t have even included Resort on this list, since it’s really not a list – it’s just Miu Miu.

 

Miu Miu

 

If Miu Miu’s Resort ’19 collection was bad, it truly wouldn’t have even mattered. With a casting like the one they had at The Regina Hotel in Paris last week, including Rowan Blanchard, Kaia Gerber, Uma Thurman, Chloe Sevigny and Naomi Campbell, no one would have even noticed the clothes. But we did, because the collection was perfect. Kind of preppy, but with a race car driver-meets-Valley of the Dolls-meets-Maui sort of look, the Miu Miu collection was what Miuccia Prada still does best, even after all these years: it was fun, it was free, and somehow, between all the clashing prints and furry heels, it was still subtle.

 


 

Fall ’18 Couture:

Couture is all about fantasy; it’s about staring at beautiful clothes you desperately want but have absolutely nowhere to wear them to. When it came to this year’s Couture Week, our favorite designers didn’t let us down, delivering some of the dreamiest collections we’ve ever seen grace the runway. I mean, Kaia Gerber at Valentino. Enough said. But don’t worry, we’ll say more anyway.

 

Chanel

 

For his Fall ’18 Chanel couture show, Karl Lagerfeld paid homage to Paris. Honestly, everything the guy does is good, and the fact that he’s still able to send tweed two-pieces down the runway, and make them look good — well, that alone, proves he’s a genius. In addition to his love of Paris, the designer built this collection around what he calls the “high profile” — long skirts that unzip to show thigh-bearing minis underneath. “You can wear it zipped down when you visit your banker, no?” he told Vogue. “And zipped up when you see your lover after!”

 

Valentino

 

At this point, there’s no way you haven’t seen at least one photo from the Valentino couture show. Images of Kaia Gerber in her amazing beehive have literally been flooding the internet. But for once, the talk is true and all the hype is worth it. The Valentino collection was the MVP of Couture Week — and maybe all of 2018. Obviously, Pat McGrath and Guido Palau killed it with the beauty; but the collection itself was completely breathtaking. I mean, the models looked like actual angels floating down the runway in their billowy gowns and floral headdresses.

 

Fendi

 

 

Fendi always knows what they’re doing. For their couture collection, the brand took a step back from the logomania that’s taken over their last few seasons, and created a ’60s-inspired ode to fur. While a lot of the industry has vowed to go fur free, Lagerfeld has doubled down with Fendi. Though the collection included bits of actual fur, it was more about the ways in which he treated other fabrics that created a sort of gaudy (but in a good way), glam feel that I totally could’ve imaged Liz Taylor or Anne Welles in.

 

Margiela

 

Discover highlights from our Autumn-Winter 2018 ‘Artisanal’ Collection designed by @jgalliano: The nomadic idea of taking life on the road is conveyed in abundant layering where garments interweave and mutate. #maisonmargiela #artisanal #artisanalartistry – Music: “Unchained Melody” Written By: Alex North & Hy Zaret Courtesy Unchained Melody Publishing LLC – Black Saturn, Nicholas Hill, Luciano Ugo Rossi, Glenn Herweijer; Ben Sumner. KPM Music When The Clock Stops, Nikky French. KPM Music Breakacuda,Benjamin Medcalf. Anger Music Circus Caravan MYMA. Justement Music Flight Remembered, Nicholas Hill, Glen Herweijer, Ben Sumner. KPM Music The Arrival, David James Caton, Harry Valentine. Anger Music Etude in e major, Frederic Chopin, Tolga Kashif, KPM Music Warhammer, Darren Mudge. Anger Music Arrangement : Jeremy Healy

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Galliano went all Fifth Element for his latest Margiela Artisanal collection (he’s too cool for couture, natch). Using VR headsets and iPhones as accessories, the designer sent a retro-futuristic, technology-obsessed collection down the runway. And hey, since people are already attached to their phones, physically adhering them to our outfits seems like a natural next step. That, or we’re going to war with aliens and Galliano is designing the outfits.

 

Viktor and Rolf

 

To celebrate their 25 years together, Viktor & Rolf decided to take 25 of the brand’s most iconic looks, and update them for their Fall ’18 couture collection. That update meant turning everything white and covering them in Swarovski crystals. Though I’ve always been a fan of Viktor & Rolf, there’s literally nothing more perfect than the bed dresses they originally created for their Fall ’05 collection — or, at least, I thought, until I saw this season’s iteration, complete with white bedazzled pillows and a down evening dress. Sigh. This is what dreams are made of.

 

Photos & Video: Instagram

Margiela Changes Its Name + 5 Fashion Meltdowns to Remember

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Maison Margiela Artisinal Spring 2015, Courtesy of Maison Margiela

With regard to everything except the clothes, John Galliano‘s much-talked about return, the debut collection for Maison Margiela was a drama free affair. The location? The 4th floor of a new London office tower. As Vanessa Friedman put it for the New York Times, In case you missed it: new building, new businesslike beginning.” All of this quiet professionalism is intentional. The clothes will speak for themselves, giving Galliano a chance to cement his status of “in recovery” from the infamous drunken, anti Semitic rant of 2011. 

Something else happened too, almost silently. What’s been “Maison Martin Margiela” since 1988 became “Maison Margiela.” It seems a wise choice to make this move with little-to-no fanfare–after all the noise surrounding the Saint Laurent rebranding was louder than anything else, for quite some time.

The name change has avoided controversy, perhaps because Galliano himself is already enshrouded in it. With the demands of a countlessly expanding seasonal schedule (spring, fall, resort, pre-fall, couture, and so on,) immense financial pressure, and fierce competition, fashion can break one down and chew one up ’til there’s nothing much to do but pitch a fit. Here’s a look back at a few designers who did:

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1. John Galliano’s Anti-Semitic Rant

First up in our short history of fashion tantrums, let’s revisit the incidents that led to Galliano’s firing from Dior. In 2011, Galliano went on a drunk tirade, one he later said he remembered nothing of, verbally attacking a couple in Paris, starting with ethnic slurs and moving on to criticize the woman’s clothes, thighs, and more.

At trial, he cited the immense pressures he felt on the job and said he was addicted to alcohol, sleeping pills, and valium. The judges disagreed, deeming him to have had “sufficient awareness of his act despite his addiction and his fragile state.” 

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2. The Saint Laurent vs. YSL Debacle

This infamous name change must have had public relations professionals everywhere shaking in their boots, and probably paved the path for Margiela’s approach to rebranding — a what not to do.

Hedi Slimane’s entrance at the house formerly known as YSL was shaky on many grounds. Around 2012, it was a straight-up disaster though. Business of Fashion‘s founder and Editor-in-Chief Imran Amed wrote extensively about the ongoing interactions with the communications team after they were asked to edit a tweet (as BlackBook’s social media manager, I know very well that this is impossible) and ultimately neglected invitations to Slimane’s debut collection “because they were unhappy with the ‘tone of voice’ that we have used when writing about YSL.” There was also mass confusion over the name and to how the company would be referred. A lengthy press release was concocted to divvy up appropriate nomenclature.

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3. Christophe Decarnin Ordered to Stay in Bed

The crowd was confused when the 2011 Balmain show closed and then-designer Decarnin was nowhere to be found to take a bow. Immediately, conflicting reports emerged. Had the designer suffered a mental breakdown, was his absence due to drugs, or had he simply stayed up too late the night before, putting finishing touches on the collection?

Reps for Balmain cited “Doctor’s Orders” to account for his absence. Decarnin was reportedly recovering from nervous exhaustion, reigniting a frequent discussion about the potentially dangerous pace of the fashion industry today.

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4. Cathy Horyn Calls Oscar de la Renta a “hot dog”

After a harsh review with a colorful if misunderstood quasi-insult from Cathy Horyn (“far more a hot dog than an éminence grise of American fashion,”) the late ODLR wasted no words nor money to address his response, which he issued vis-à-vis a full page ad in WWD, entitled “An Open Letter to Cathy Horyn from Oscar De La Renta.”

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5. Is Jil Sander at Jil Sander?

Jil Sander founded her eponymous house in 1968. Since then, she’s exited and re-entered so many times that her comings and goings are both hard to keep track of, and met with incredulity.

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