Strolling Around New York With Its Most Likable Brummie Chef, April Bloomfield

On a stormy Friday afternoon, a girl sat staring at her pig. More specifically, April Bloomfield, the Birmingham-born chef who first brought gastropubs to New York with The Spotted Pig, and later The Breslin and The John Dory Oyster Bar, eyed a pile of homemade malfatti pasta tangled up with tree frog-green arugula and glistening bits of rosy suckling pig at Maialino, one of the chef’s neighborhood haunts. It is an apt choice considering the chef there, Nick Anderer, handles Italian food much in the same way Bloomfield expresses English cuisine: balancing high and low, delicate and rustic, with lots of hog thrown in. Bloomfield is just settling back into her cooking routines after a grueling book tour for her first cookbook, A Girl and Her Pig: Recipes and Stories. So she was extra happy to visit her favorite New York hangouts.

april bloomfield maialino

Maialino
2 Lexington Ave, New York, NY

(212) 777-2410
I live around the corner and come here at all times of the day. There’s this wonderful thing on the menu called a caramellato. It’s basically a brioche bun dipped in butterscotch vanilla sauce. They’re addictive. You can buy six to-go, but they’ll only do six. I’ve tried to convince them to give me more, but chef Nick wouldn’t do it.
 

april bloomfield kalustyan's

Kalustyan’s
123 Lexington Ave, New York, NY

(212) 685-3451
Being from England, I love curry. It’s our national dish, and this is the most amazing spice shop you’ll ever come across to find it. You know how you can spend hours in hardware stores, whether you love home improvement or not? This is the equivalent for chefs. It’s not just a spice shop though. They have vinegars, oils, sugars, salts, nuts, and grains.

april bloomfield bonnie slotnick

Bonnie Slotnick Cookbooks
163 W. 10th St., New York, NY

(212) 989-8962

When I first moved to New York, I found this tiny store. Bonnie has old books and modern books and everything in between. We’re picking up a book today that my friend Matt Dillon [of Sitka & Spruce] in Seattle recommended. It’s called Auberge of the Flowering Hearth. I’m excited to just go read it and touch the pages. Sometimes it’s nice to pick up an book that has that old smell. You don’t get that smell with iPads. They all just smell like Apple.
 

april bloomfield the smile

The Smile
26 Bond St., New York, NY

(646) 329-5836
When you’re at The Smile, you feel like you’ve stepped out of New York. I really like places that transport you. The Smile is rustic and perfect for a rainy day like this when you can curl up with a cup of tea—though the coffee here is great, too—and their delicious avocado salad.
 

april bloomfield korin

Korin
57 Warren St., New York, NY


(212) 587-7021

I heard about Korin from one of my chefs at The Breslin. The first time I ever went down, I was a little overwhelmed, but everyone is so helpful and friendly. They do a range of Japanese and Western-style knives. I got one that was sort of both—slightly firmer metal so they’re easy to clean and they don’t oxidize so much—instead of a totally traditional Japanese–style knife that is harder to maintain. They’re not a chain. It’s just a one–off. It’s not like Sur La Table. I like to support the smaller guy.

Photos by Eric Medsker.

4 Out of 5: Soraya Darabi on New York

Soraya Darabi is a digital strategest and cofounder of Foodspotting. This is her take on four places she likes, and one place she doesn’t.

RECOMMENDED

Boqueria –  "A longtime fan of Boqueria in the Flatiron District, I was so pleased to see Tertulia open in the West Village this season. The Ibérico pork ribs are not to be missed!"

Dear Fieldbinder – "A best bet for vintage-inspired frocks with a German twist.  All of my coolest Brooklyn girlfriends shop here.  A signature key necklace I’ve worn every day for almost 6 years was purchased at Dear the first week I moved to the city from college."

Gramercy Park Hotel – "When it’s not a bustling ‘it’ spot, Rose Bar at The Gramercy Park Hotel makes for a mighty fine reading room.  You can find me there every Sunday afternoon, pretending it’s my own.  The art, expertly curated, changes seasonally and the fire is always roaring. Pro tip: If you’re nice to the waiters, they’ll let you order the salumi platter from Maialino and nibble it on a tray at Rose.

Trump Soho – The Trump Soho opened a killer spa last year, and I recommend their Turkish Haman baths constantly.   It’s an authentic wash and scrub down – perhaps not as pleasant as it is refreshing.  The cold jolts of water at the end are exhilarating.

NOT SO MUCH

The East River Promenade at night – The view of the boroughs bridges is gorgeous, but it can get a bit sketchy after 8. Stick to the West Side Promenade instead, starting with a tour of the High Line.

[Photo: Elk Studios]

The Gramercy Park Hotel Is Doing Just Fine Without Ian Schrager, Thank You

Back in 2006, when Ian Schrager reopened New York’s Gramercy Park Hotel to much acclaim and a parade of celebrity guests, he left behind the specters of the former owners, the Weissberg family, whose string of tragedies culminated in scion David jumping from the roof to his death. Now Schrager, who still casts an apparitional shadow over his many previous ventures, has moved on, leaving the hotel to find a way forward on its own considerable merits. Hoping to get an inside take on the future of the Gramercy, I caught up with GM Scott Koster on a recent afternoon in the Rose Bar, which, it must be said, looks startlingly different at 3pm than it does at 3am.

“We talk a lot about when a hotel reaches iconic stature,” Koster explained. “There are a lot of people that take what Ian Schrager and Julian Schnabel created here and try to recreate it somewhere else. But there’s something intrinsic here that you can’t just replicate. Design alone does not make a facility; at Gramercy Park Hotel we’ve been able to maintain an ethos. At this point, you’d have to work to mess it up.”

Indeed, disguising myself as a guest, I found it remarkable how perfected the culture of the second generation Gramercy has become. From an almost pastoral breakfast on the Terrace to a buzzy lunch at Maialino to evening cocktails in the Jade and Rose Bars, it was clear that the hotel isn’t making any rash, ill-advised changes in an attempt to shake off Schrager’s influence. In fact, Maialino, Danny Meyer’s sophisticated but remarkably inviting Roman style trattoria, which opened in late 2009 (replacing the haughty Wakiya), may have already become the touchstone for a new era for the GPH.

Koster agreed. “We want [the Gramercy] to be a true New York experience. And to do that, you have to be involved in the community. What Danny Meyer and Maialino did was to cement that. I think it put us into the fabric of the neighborhood,” he said.

Damion Luaiye remains as Creative Director, but nightlife impresario and celeb-magnet Nur Khan has departed, with Sebastien Lefavre now brought over from GoldBar to oversee the hotel’s considerable nocturnal goings on. Also on the way is a new bar setup on the roof, which Koster hopes will create a more seamless flow of buzz throughout the public spaces.

“We want the Terrace and the Rose Bar to feed off of each other,” he further explained. “Being inclusive rather than exclusive is really the direction we’re going in. Not to say that the Rose Bar is not going to remain one of the most difficult reservations to get; it always will be.”

So, moving on from the era of Ian Schrager has not been too difficult, even though his and Schnabel’s touch still permeates the space. Indeed, the Gramercy Park Hotel in some ways feels more like an extravagant Florentine Renaissance palazzo than a hip New York hotel.

“He is an amazing visionary,” Koster observed of Schrager. “But once a hotel is created, the people who are running it help give it a life of its own. While he gave birth to it, eventually it does become its own entity.”

Hotel ‘Hood: A Snapshot of Gramercy Park Hotel

A simple postage stamp-size photo of a hotel room cannot possibly forecast the sort of experience you’ll actually have there. What sorts of treasures, sights, and smells lie within and around the hotel? It’s about the neighborhood. The food. The lighting. And in the case of the Gramercy Park Hotel, the people and the wonderful, old world opulence and glamor represented in its every detail. From the velvet curtains and the outsize art in its massive hall, to its historical block and landscaped grounds, here’s a snapshot of Gramercy Park’s finest offerings.

image The Neighborhood The block Gramercy Park Hotel is situated on is quiet and tree-lined. It’s mostly residential, and features guest access to the private park just outside its door. image Eating and Drinking Inside the hotel you have Maialino, Rose Bar, and a lovely rooftop and garden bar.

Nightlife and Dining Nearby Rose Bar & Jade Bar at the Gramercy Park Hotel Maialino Novita BLT Prime SPiN New York Ciano Pete’s Tavern Pure Food and Wine Choshi Sushi Friend of a Farmer

(Photos by City Sage, Fudd and Weblicist.)

The Dish: Maialino’s Malfatti al Maialino

What: Malfatti al Maialino—suckling pig ragu, arugula, and hand-torn pasta Where: Maialino, the 11th addition to Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group portfolio, serving Roman-Italian fare in the Gramercy Park Hotel. Ideal meal: Date night or hosting out-of-towners. The bustling, lively arena of Maialino’s farmhouse interior, facing Gramercy Park, is an excellent backdrop for a one-on-one where intimate conversation requires some leaning in. Also a picturesque destination resto for New York newbies. Because: Maialino means suckling pig, and she lives up to her namesake. Tastes like: Suckling pig falling apart almost without a knife, and the pasta will remind you of farm-raised eggs, lightly doused in creamy ragu. Bottom line: $21 from the Primi section of the menu. Easily doubles as Secondi. But practice sharing if you’re starting with this one. It’s on the heavier side, and no one wants to roll you home.

A Room with a Free View

I spent the weekend at the brilliant Gramercy Park Hotel. It was a blogger thing with fellow writers and editors from Nylon, Huffington Post, Urban Daddy and Mr. and Mrs. Smith cocktailing and dining. Even my old pal Scott Solish from Eater was there. It was breakfast and dinners and fine wine and strolls through the ultra private Gramercy Park. We slumbered in feather soft beds in rooms with views. I always look gift horses in the mouth, kick the tires and ask direct questions while looking people right in the eye, but nobody wanted anything of us “except to experience the property.”

I asked one of the PR peeps if there was any reason for the timing of this tour. I was told that they just wanted us to see the hotel and what it had to offer. I said the getaway was “sort of like a flare reminding New York and the rest of the world that they were still here” and that was an acceptable explanation for them. Except for visits to my man Nur at GPH’s Rose Bar and an occasional walk through the lobby and bar to see the art, I suppose I haven’t “considered” the hotel lately.The place really is undeniable. The staff was bright, sophisticated, informed and informative. The restaurants were brilliant. Danny Meyer’s touch was everywhere and my summer slim-down diet was severely sidetracked. Maialino on the ground floor was a fun feast. The roof club brunch was wonderful and on such a lovely day.

In a town that has been dominated by news of Andre Balazs and the Standard Hotel of late, it was enlightening to revisit Ian Schrager’s Gramercy. These properties set the bar, one doesn’t have to be hipper, cooler, hotter than the other. They are the ultimate in the boutique hotel experience.

I keep promising my take on Jon Lennon, Adam Alpert and Jus-Ske’s new company “4am” but something keeps coming up . By the time you hear my story about them they’ll have renamed it to 6am. I got a frantic call Saturday about the Roxy. My source told me that the Roxy was going to be reopening with Peter Gatien in the deep background. My crazy (but too lazy to check for himself) pal went on to say “Wow, that’s nuts. Gatien is the reason the Community Boards need to exist.” I laughed and went straight to the horse’s mouth. Since this horse is a dark horse, I’ll keep his name blacked out. My man said, after 3 full minutes of laughter, that the story is not at all true. The Roxy will not return as a club but may reincarnate itself as a roller rink and restaurant if the Community Board agrees. The chit chat turned to the revelation that a new mega club is planned for a West 50’s location. The project is well funded and so far away from baby carriages and retirees that it might actually happen. I know the players that were mentioned and they are seasoned pros with no baggage.

BlackBook Staff Picks: Dining, Drinking, Shopping, & Staying

Here at BlackBook, we pay a lot of attention to where cool customers go out — bars, clubs, restaurants, shops, hotels, you name it. So why not flip the frame and let you see where we go out? Here’s a periodically updated, exhaustive list of hotspots currently favored by everyone at BlackBook, from the mighty bosses down to the humble interns, from the charming local lounges around the corner to the jet-setting temples of luxe living.

BLACKBOOK MEDIA CORP ● Chairman – Bob Hoff, Voyeur (LA) ● CEO – Ari Horowitz, W South Beach (Miami) ● Associate Publisher – Brett Wagner, Da Umberto (NYC) ● Director of Finance and Operations – Tim Umstead, Aquagrill (NYC) ● Corporate Counsel – Drew Patrick, El Ay Si (NYC) ● Executive Assistant – Bridgette Bek, Manhattan Inn (NYC)

EDITORIAL ● Creative Director – Jason Daniels, Morimoto (NYC) ● Vice President Content – Chris Mohney, This Little Piggy Had Roast Beef (NYC) ● Senior Editor – Nick Haramis, Freemans (NYC) ● Features Editor – Willa Paskin, The Sackett (NYC) ● Writer-at-Large – Alison Powell, Jean Philippe Patisserie (Las Vegas) ● Nightlife Correspondent – Steve Lewis, subMercer (NYC) ● Assistant Editors – Ben Barna, LeVack Block (Toronto), Cayte Grieve, Vince (NYC), Foster Ethan Kamer, Sel De Mer (NYC), Eiseley Tauginas, Maialino (NYC) ● Copy Editor – Michèle Filon, Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink (Miami) ● Editorial Interns – Megan LaBruna, Crash Mansion (NYC), Averie Timm, Madiba (NYC), Hillary Weston, Les Halles (NYC), Annie Werner, DBGB (NYC), Ashley Simpson, Barcade (NYC), Michael Jordan, Destination Bar & Grill (NYC)

ART ● Art Director – Amy Steinhauser, Union Pool (NYC) ● Assistant Designer – Serra Semi, Five Points (NYC) ● Photography Assistant – Stephanie Swanicke, Provocateur (NYC) ● Freelance Designer – Krista Quick, Fornino (NYC)

FASHION & BEAUTY ● Fashion Editor – Christopher Campbell, Grand Sichuan International (NYC) ● Fashion Interns – Jillian K. Aurrichio, Greenhouse (NYC), Anabele Netter, Il Buco (NYC), Nicole Applewhite, Vanilla Bake Shop (NYC), Deanna Clevesy, Tao (NYC)

ADVERTISING ● Senior Account Executive – Dina Matar, Blue Duck Tavern (Washington, DC) ● Executive Director, BlackBook Access – Gregg Berger, Charles (NYC) ● Advertising Director – Michelle Koruda, Supper (NYC) ● Detroit Account Executives – Jeff Hannigan, The Lodge (Chicago), Kristen von Bernthal, Pukk (NYC) ● Midwest Account Executives – Susan Welter, Old Town Social (Chicago), Andrea Forrester, Tuman’s (Chicago) ● Southwest Account Executive – Molly Ballantine, The Tar Pit (LA) ● Northwest Account Executives – Catherine Hurley, Flora (Oakland), Shawn O’Meara, Nopalito (San Francisco)

MARKETING ● Marketing Manager – Julie Fabricant, Eponymy (NYC) ● Partnerships & Promotions Manager – Andrew Berman, Bozu (NYC) ● Interns – Adam Meshekow, Ronnybrook Milk Bar (NYC), Kayla Gambino, Grom (NYC), Marie Baginski, Stir (NYC)

DIGITAL ● Director of Development – Daniel Murphy, Standard (Miami) ● Developer – Bastian Kuberek, Greenhouse (NYC) ● Developer – Dan Simon, Hudson Terrace (NYC) ● Designer – Matt Strmiska, Uchi (Austin) ● Developer – Sam Withrow, Phone Booth (San Francisco) ● Quality Assurance Engineer – Sunde Johnson, Ginger’s Bar (NYC) ● Mobile Developer – Otto Toth, Alloro (NYC)

Where Celebs Go Out: America Ferrera, Harvey Keitel, Hope Davis

At the premiere of Our Family Wedding:

● AMERICA FERRERA – “My favorite restaurant of the moment is Broadway East, on the Lower East Side.” ● CHARLIE MURPHY – “I’ve been going to this Mexican restaurant in New Jersey. I think it’s called El Torito, whatever. That’s one of them. I go to so many restaurants. This is what I want to explain, so no one’s insulted. I’m on the road 48 weeks of the year in different towns, and I go to a lot of restaurants, so to ask me what my favorite restaurant is, is kind of a hard question to answer. I like going to Baja Fresh in L.A.” ● GRETCHEN ROSSI – “In Newport Beach, it’s Flemings. It’s a steakhouse, and I eat the steak and potatoes and everything that you can imagine on the menu. But I just eat small portions, so that you get a taste of everything.”

● LANCE GROSS – “I love Tao here in New York. I don’t get to New York a lot, but the Cafeteria. I love the Cafeteria. I do all the nightclubs. I don’t even know the names. I just go into them.” ● REGINA KING – “Right now, I’m really loving Osteria Mozza in L.A., Mario Batali’s restaurant. It’s so funny because where he opened was a place in L.A. that there’s been four restaurants that tried to make it there; came; spent a lot of money; closed down. And he has been booming, banging with business, and rightfully so. So, if you go and get the oxtail ragu — oh, my God! Hah! It is so good, and mmmm, the pizza next door is even better, because it’s Nancy Silverton from La Brea Bakery making the dough. I love to eat, clearly.” ● PRAS – “Geez! Right now it’s gotta be Dylan Prime. That’s in my neighborhood. Every time I’m out of town, I always take a trip back to Dylan. I feel like I’ve landed back home. Do you like steak? I love — I’m a big meat eater, despite all the things they tell you about eating charred beef.”

At the opening of A Behanding in Spokane on Broadway:

● HARVEY KEITEL – “A candy store in Brighton Beach, in Brooklyn. It was called Ali Baba & the 40 Thieves.” ● ANTHONY MACKIE – “Hey, book that is black! I love to go down to STK. One of my very favorite restaurants is Three Sisters, on Madison and 124th — the best Caribbean food you can find in New York. ● JENNIFER MORRISON – “I have had no chance to discover that yet because we just opened last night. Where in L.A.? I love Madeo restaurant. We eat there all the time. Dan Tana’s, some of the usual spots. I’m a huge fan of spaghetti and meat sauce. It’s my weakness, anywhere I go.” ● ZOE KAZAN – “I love your magazine! I haven’t been going to a lot of bars or clubs lately. I’ve been going to theater hangouts, like the West Bank Cafe or Bar Centrale. In my neighborhood, I love Buttermilk Channel, which is a restaurant in Cobble Hill or Frankie’s 457. I like the fried chicken at Buttermilk Channel.” ● MARTIN MCDONAGH – “Angus McIndoe.” ● HUGH JACKMAN – “Oh, c’mon!”

● DANA IVEY – “I don’t want to give it away ’cause too many people will go there. I don’t want to say because it’ll be infiltrated by everybody, and I won’t get a seat! No, but Joe Allen’s is always good. That’s one of my faves. Oh, they have this great, great salad that I really, really like — trevisano, something, I can’t remember, but that’s what I get every time.” ● HOPE DAVIS –Buttermilk Channel in Brooklyn.” ● JOAN HAMBURG – “You mean in this neighborhood? I love to go to Orso’s. Oh, I like a lot of places. I like Blue Hill downtown. I got a list!” ● SARAH PAULSON – “One of them is a secret. I don’t want anybody else to know about it, so I won’t talk about that place. I love a place called Café Cluny, on 12th Street and West 4th Street, down in the Village. Any favorite dish? The burger and the Cluny. It’s a giant martini, which is always really good. I’m, kind of, like a person who only goes to places that are in the neighborhood I happen to be standing in, in the moment, which is what’s so great about New York — you’re bound to turn around and hit something great.” ● MARCIA GAY HARDEN – “Oh, God, we never go out. Honestly, we don’t go out. Our living room, our kitchen, our dining room. What about in L.A.? Oh, God, I wouldn’t say L.A. before New York! I couldn’t possibly say L.A. before New York. Okay, wait! We like Settepani in Harlem. We love Orso. We love Orso.” ● STACY KEACH – “It’s a tough one, isn’t it? There’s so many. Joe’s restaurant in Venice. Everything is good, but I, particularly, like steak ‘n eggs, yeah. In New York, there’s so many wonderful restaurants, and we just got here. And every time I come back to New York, I discover new places, so I’m hesitant to give you names of places.” ● PABLO SCHREIBER – “The old standards are the — what’s the place over here on 46th where we go after the show? It’s right above Joe Allen’s. Yeah, I, always forget the name of it ’cause they have no sign. [That would be Bar Centrale. -ed] That’s my favorite place for after-dinner drinks. I went to a great Greek restaurant last night, called Molyvos, on 7th Avenue between 55th and 56th. That place was pretty delicious. I had the whole fish. It was a black sea bass, and they did it perfectly. I’m a father of a 16th-month-old kid, so I don’t get out much these days.” ● DAVID HYDE PIERCE – “No, I don’t have any. I don’t have a lot of places to talk about like that.” ● LILY RABE – “I love Maialino. It’s in the Gramercy Park Hotel. It just opened. It’s amazing. Yes, it’s really good. And I love Café Cluny. Morandi. Those are my favorite places to eat. And the Breslin is also really incredible. The Breslin has this pork belly that’s one of the most memorable things I’ve ever eaten in the city.” ● JULIE TAYMORE –Craft, Maialino, Bobby Flay’s restaurant Mesa Grill.” ● TOM WAITS – “Oh, gee, I eat at home. I eat at home.” ● PAUL DANO – “Eton’s — it’s a dumpling place in Brooklyn. Po. Franny’s — all Brooklyn.” ● ANTHONY ANDERSON – “I really don’t hang out much in New York because of the work schedule that we have. But when I do, I find myself having a drink at Tillman’s. My favorite eatery would have to be Abe & Arthur’s.” ● GRIFFIN DUNNE – “I’m mostly upstate these days, so I’ve got little holes up there that I hit, in Duchess County. What do I want to plug? Gigi’s, an Italian restaurant — very, very good. I think that’s in Rhinebeck, yeah.”

Where Celebs Go Out: Harvey Keitel, Anthony Mackie, Marcia Gay Harden, Jennifer Morrison

1. Harvey Keitel at the opening of A Behanding in Sokane on Broadway: “A candy store in Brighton Beach, in Brooklyn. It was called Ali Baba & the 40 Thieves.” 2. Anthony Mackie: “Hey, book that is black! I love to go down to STK. One of my very favorite restaurants is Three Sisters, on Madison and 124th — the best Caribbean food you can find in New York. 3. Jennifer Morrison: “I have had no chance to discover that yet because we just opened last night. Where in L.A.? I love Medeo Restaurant. We eat there all the time. Dan Tana’s, some of the usual spots. Any favorite dishes? I’m a huge fan of spaghetti and meat sauce. It’s my weakness, anywhere I go, so …”

4.Zoe Kazan: “I love your magazine! I haven’t been going to a lot of bars or clubs lately. I’ve been going to theater hangouts, like the West Bank Cafe or Bar Centrale. In my neighborhood, I love Buttermilk Chanel, which is a restaurant in Cobble Hill or Frankie’s 457. I like the fried chicken at Buttermilk Chanel.” 5. Martin McDonagh: “Angus McAndoes.” 6. Hugh Jackman: “Oh, c’mon!” 7. Dana Ivey: “I don’t want to give it away ’cause too many people will go there. I don’t want to say because it’ll be infiltrated by everybody, and I won’t get a seat! No, but Joe Allen’s is always good. That’s one of my faves. Oh, they have this great, great salad that I really, really like — trevisano, something, I can’t remember, but that’s what I get every time.” 8. Hope Davis: “Buttermilk Channel in Brooklyn.” 9. Joan Hamburg: “You mean in this neighborhood? I love to go to Orso’s. Oh, I like a lot [of places]. I like Blue Hill downtown. I got a list!” 10. Sarah Paulson: “One of them is a secret. I don’t want anybody else to know about it, so I won’t talk about that place. I love a place called Cafe Cluny, on 12th Street and West 4th Street, down in the Village. Any favorite dish? The burger and the Cluny. It’s a giant martini, which is always really good. I’m, kind of, like a person who only goes to places that are in the neighborhood I happen to be standing in, in the moment, which is what’s so great about New York — you’re bound to turn around and hit something great.” 11. Marcia Gay Harden: “Oh, God, we never go out. Honestly, we don’t go out. Our living room, our kitchen, our dining room. What about in L.A.? Oh, God, I wouldn’t say L.A. before New York! I couldn’t possibly say L.A. before New York. Okay, wait! We like Settepani in Harlem. We love Orso. We love Orso.” 12. Stacy Keech: “It’s a tough one, isn’t it? There’s so many. Joe’s restaurant in Venice [California]. Everything is good, but I, particularly, like steak ‘n eggs, yeah. In New York, there’s so many wonderful restaurants, and we just got here. And every time I come back to New York, I discover new places, so I’m hesitant to give you names of places.” 13. Pablo Schreiber: “The old standards are the — what’s the place over here on 46th where we go after the show? It’s right above Joe Allen’s. Yeah, I, always forget the name of it ’cause they have no sign. [Bar Centrale] That’s my favorite place for after-dinner drinks. I went to a great Greek restaurant last night, called Molyvos, on 7th Avenue between 55th and 56th. That place was pretty delicious. I had the whole fish. It was a black sea bass, and they did it perfectly. I’m a father of a 16th-month-old kid, so I don’t get out much these days.” 14. David Hyde Pierce: “No, I don’t have any. I don’t have a lot of places to talk about like that.” 15. Lily Rabe: “I love Maialino. It’s in the Gramercy Park Hotel. It just opened. It’s amazing. Yes, it’s really good. And I love Cafe Cluny. Morandi. Those are my favorite places to eat. And The Breslin is also really incredible. And the Breslin has this pork belly that’s one of the most memorable things I’ve ever eaten in the city.” 16. Julie Taymor: “Craft, Maialino, Bobby Flay’s restaurant, Mesa Grill.” 17. Tom Waits: “Oh, gee, I eat at home. I eat at home.” 18. Paul Dano: “Eton’s– it’s a dumpling place in Brooklyn. Po; Franny’s — all Brooklyn.” 19. Anthony Anderson: “I really don’t hang out much in New York because of the work schedule that we have. But when I do, I find myself having a drink at Tillman’s. My favorite eatery would have to be Abe & Arthur’s.” 20.Griffin Dunne: “I’m mostly upstate these days, so I’ve got little holes up there that I hit, in Duchess County. What do I want to plug? Gigi’s, an Italian restaurant — very, very good. I think that’s in Rhinebeck, yeah.”