On His Birthday, Watch 12 Lars von Trier Films Streaming Right Now

Notorious Danish director has made a career of turning personal pain into creative expression and cinematic pleasure. For over three decades now, he’s been delivering his signature brand of emotionally potent cinema that explores the depths of human suffering and the ways we attempt to cope with the aches of existence. While grandiose in tone, there’s always a stark humanity to his work and a distinct visual sense all his own. As today marks the director’s 59th birthday, celebrate by diving into his work with films from 2014’s Nymphomaniac to his student short films.

Bonus: Watch  Lars von Trier in the 1998 Short Documentary Lars From 1-10 Lars von Trier, Wim Wenders, & More in ‘FreeDogme’

NYMPHOMANIAC (2013)

Fascinating in its novel-esque richness, Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac is a cacophony of visceral emotion and brilliant storytelling, weaving together the fragmented tale of one woman’s life. And after ravaging the screen in Antichrist and Melancholia, Gainsbourg delivers a tortured and deeply intense performance as Joe, allowing us to empathize with a woman who can be both disastrous in her behavior, but incredibly human and refreshingly honest. Here we see a character whose insatiable desire for sex and for pleasure is not only about the satisfying the physical sensation, but about a deep-rooted longing, and need to fill the emptiness and the eternal void that makes life frightening. For Joe, who repeatedly demands, “Fill all my holes,” sex becomes the ritual that gives her life meaning and structure,  making the film not only an erotic epic, but an exploration of the rituals we hold sacred that give way to addictions and become the fire that keep us alive.

Available to watch on Netflix, iTunes and Amazon Instant Video

MELANCHOLIA (2011)

If I were choosing a director to make a film about the end of the world, von Trier the gloomy Dane might be my first choice. The only other name that comes to mind is Werner Herzog’s. Both understand that at such a time silly little romantic subplots take on a vast irrelevance. Doctor Johnson told Boswell: “Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.” In the cast of von Trier’s characters, impending doom seems to have created a mental state of dazed detachment. They continue to act as if their personal concerns have the slightest relevance. Von Trier has never made a more realistic domestic drama, depicting a family that is dysfunctional not in crazy ways but in ways showing a defiant streak of intelligent individualism. (x)

Available to watch on Netflix, iTunes and Amazon

ANTICHRIST (2009)

Lars von Trier shook up the film world when he premiered Antichrist at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival. In this graphic psychodrama, a grief-stricken man and woman—a searing Willem Dafoe and Cannes best actress winner Charlotte Gainsbourg—retreat to their cabin deep in the woods after the accidental death of their infant son, only to find terror and violence at the hands of nature and, ultimately, each other. But this most confrontational work yet from one of contemporary cinema’s most controversial artists is no mere provocation. It is a visually sublime, emotionally ravaging journey to the darkest corners of the possessed human mind; a disturbing battle of the sexes that pits rational psychology against age-old superstition; and a profoundly effective horror film. (x)

Available to watch on Hulu +, Netflix, iTunes and Amazon

DOGVILLE (2003)

The idea reminds us of “Our Town,” but von Trier’s version could be titled “Our Hell.” In his town, which I fear works as a parable of America, the citizens are xenophobic, vindictive, jealous, suspicious and capable of rape and murder. His dislike of the United States (which he has never visited, since he is afraid of airplanes) is so palpable that it flies beyond criticism into the realm of derangement. When the film premiered at Cannes 2003, he was accused of not portraying Americans accurately, but how many movies do? Anything by David Spade come to mind? Von Trier could justifiably make a fantasy about America, even an anti-American fantasy, and produce a good film, but here he approaches the ideological subtlety of a raving prophet on a street corner. (x)

Available to stream on iTunes and Amazon Instant Video

BREAKING THE WAVES (1996)

Lars von Trier became an international sensation with this galvanizing realist fable about sex and spiritual transcendence. In an Oscar-nominated performance, Emily Watson stuns as Bess, a simple, pious newlywed in a tiny Scottish village who gives herself up to a shocking form of martyrdom after her husband (Stellan Skarsgård) is paralyzed in an oil rig accident. Breaking the Waves, both brazen and tender, profane and pure, is an examination of the expansiveness of faith and of its limits. (x)

Available to watch on iTunes, Amazon Instant Video and Hulu +

EUROPA (1991)

“You will now listen to my voice . . . On the count of ten you will be in Europa . . .” So begins Max von Sydow’s opening narration to Lars von Trier’s hypnoticEuropa (known in the U.S. as Zentropa), a fever dream in which American pacifist Leopold Kessler (Jean-Marc Barr) stumbles into a job as a sleeping-car conductor for the Zentropa railways in a Kafkaesque 1945 postwar Frankfurt. With its gorgeous black-and-white and color imagery and meticulously recreated (if then nightmarishly deconstructed) costumes and sets, Europa is one of the great Danish filmmaker’s weirdest and most wonderful works, a runaway-train ride to an oddly futuristic past. (x)

Available to watch on Hulu +

DANCER IN THE DARK (2000)

The film stars Bjork, the Icelandic pop star, as Selma, a Czech who has emigrated to America, has a small son, works as a punch-press operator, is going blind and is saving her money for an operation to prevent her son from going blind, too. To supplement her income she fastens straight pins to cards for a fraction of a penny per card. She keeps her money in a candy box. If I told you the movie was set in 1912 and starred Lillian Gish, you might not have the slightest difficulty in accepting this plot; whether you would like it, of course, would depend on whether you could make the leap of sympathy into the world of silent melodrama. (x)

Available to watch on iTunes

ELEMENT OF CRIME (1984)

Lars von Trier’s stunning debut film is the story of Fisher, an exiled ex-cop who returns to his old beat to catch a serial killer with a taste for young girls. Influenced equally by Hitchcock and science fiction, von Trier (Europa, Breaking the Waves, The Idiots) boldly reinvents expressionist style for his own cinematic vision of a post-apocalyptic world. Shot in shades of sepia, with occasional, startling flashes of bright blue, The Element of Crime(Forbrydelsens Element) combines dark mystery and operatic sweep to yield a pure celluloid nightmare. (x)

Available to watch on Hulu+

EN BLOMST (1971)

Hvorfor flygte fra det du ved du ikke kan flygte fra? Fordi du er en kujon AKA Why Try to Escape from Which You Know You Can’t Escape from? Because You Are a Coward. 

Watch HERE

THE ORCHID GARDENER 

Screen-shot-2014-03-25-at-2.18.00-PM-670x418

“A young, mentally ill man, a visual artist in crisis Victor Marse (Lars von Trier) meets two nurses (Eliza and her girlfriend) during his stay in a sanatorium. These nurses are obvious lesbians. Victor lives with Eliza and her son. He imagines another woman when he is roaming at a coast. He pretends committing a suicide but Eliza does not react to it. Every moment, he stays in front of a blank canvas and thinks. Meanwhile he dresses into Nazi clothes or into women dresses, then he leaves to go to the cinema, and abuses and probably kills a small girl. His masochistic affair with Eliza lasts; he is close to shooting her with a gun but instead she takes out a whip. Victor goes along the streets then he lies naked in front of the canvas on which he has left his bloody fingerprints. After this he drives a funeral car to his work – he is employed in a garden where orchids are grown. Eliza is now the past and in the end, Victor might be dead as someone drives a cross into the ground.”

Watch HERE

METNHE (1979)

Screen-shot-2014-03-25-at-2.19.03-PM-670x418

“la bienheureuse is a Danish short film of the Danish director Lars von Trier from 1979. The film is based on the sadomasochistic novel by Dominique Aury , Story of O , and tells the story of a voluntary female subjugation . The production is produced in black and white, the second by the famous artist.”

Watch HERE
NOCTURNE (1980)

The Early Short Films of Lars von Trier

Happy Birthday, Lars!

Before Lars von Trier became our reigning dark emperor of painful and psychologically unpinning cinema, he was just a boy with a movie camera  coming out of the National Film School of Denmark. And before his 1984 directorial debut The Element of Crime, he made a series of short films that, when you look back at them now, helped to establish the themes and tones that would later resonate all through his work. When once asked if there was more misery than joy in the world, Trier said:

Misery, damnit! Clearly. You may argue: Orgasm. Yes, that’s fine enough. But, orgasms, Ferraris, and other pleasures. Yes, but with death and suffering at the other end of the scale, these weigh more, I think. And there’s much more suffering and pain than pleasure. And when you enjoy a spring day, that too is a kind of melancholy.

But as a director who has always taken a pleasure in exposing the painful nature of existence, for Lars, it comes from a place of honesty rather than a perversity. Even from the his early short films, it’s evident that his unique style of filmmaking stems from an extremely dark place that not only serves to shock but to ignite. Known for having very intense phobias and bouts of severe depression, Lars is kind of a model of mental illness, using his extreme anxieties and fears to fuel his creative work. He puts us ill at ease ourselves and with the world around us, allowing us a glimpse into his troubled mind and making us feel not so alone in ours.

When we spoke to Charlotte Gainsbourg about Melancholia, she recalled her experience on Antichrist, saying that when they shot the film, Lars, “was not well and didn’t know if he would be able to finish the film,” and that they, “suffered looking at him and not being able to cope with everything.” However,  Antichrist was completed and serves as one of the most powerful films he’s ever made.

“Are we alone in the universe?,” Nils Thorsen once said Trier—to which he responded, “We are. But no one wants to realize it. They keep wanting to push limits and fly whenever. Forget it! Look inward.”

And today, let’s take a moment to admire his bizarre, disturbing, and wonderful short films that echo the sentiment felt strongly still in his work today.

En Blomst (1971)

Hvorfor flygte fra det du ved du ikke kan flygte fra? Fordi du er en kujon AKA Why Try to Escape from Which You Know You Can’t Escape from? Because You Are a Coward (1970)
Watch HERE

Screen shot 2014-03-25 at 2.18.00 PM

The Orchid Gardener (1977)

“A young, mentally ill man, a visual artist in crisis Victor Marse (Lars von Trier) meets two nurses (Eliza and her girlfriend) during his stay in a sanatorium. These nurses are obvious lesbians. Victor lives with Eliza and her son. He imagines another woman when he is roaming at a coast. He pretends committing a suicide but Eliza does not react to it. Every moment, he stays in front of a blank canvas and thinks. Meanwhile he dresses into Nazi clothes or into women dresses, then he leaves to go to the cinema, and abuses and probably kills a small girl. His masochistic affair with Eliza lasts; he is close to shooting her with a gun but instead she takes out a whip. Victor goes along the streets then he lies naked in front of the canvas on which he has left his bloody fingerprints. After this he drives a funeral car to his work – he is employed in a garden where orchids are grown. Eliza is now the past and in the end, Victor might be dead as someone drives a cross into the ground.”
Watch HERE

Screen shot 2014-03-25 at 2.19.03 PM

Menthe (1979)

“la bienheureuse is a Danish short film of the Danish director Lars von Trier from 1979. The film is based on the sadomasochistic novel by Dominique Aury , Story of O , and tells the story of a voluntary female subjugation . The production is produced in black and white, the second by the famous artist.”
Watch HERE

http://youtu.be/6143hgZ2_fQ

Nocturne (1980)

Get a Taste of Lars von Trier’s ‘Nymphomaniac Vol.2’

Earlier today, we shared our interview with Nymphomaniac star Charlotte Gainsbourg. Speaking to the film and working with Trier, she noted that:

The characters go so far into suffering and depression. I know people have said that this was a trilogy—Antichrist, Melancholia, and Nymphomaniac—but I don’t see where the trilogy is. Although depression was the subject in the first two, but in this one I don’t see a trilogy. However, I can see how much he reveals of himself, and how honest he is about his suffering.

I don’t see that in a lot of other directors that I’ve worked with. For Antichrist, I remember I hadn’t gone through having any panic attacks before, and he was showing me by just being there what those anxiety attacks were, because he was going through them the whole time. A lot of it had to do with imitation, or just mimicking. In that sense I could see that I was portraying him. He’s so open about himself, and that’s why I feel that he’s portraying himself. This film was very easy to see that, and on every subject he was setting up two characters in opposition that were both him.

And today, you can finally get a taste of Nymphomaniac: Volume II, with a new trailer. See Volume I in theaters Friday, and start counting down the seconds until the latter half is released April 18th.

Forget Love With the New Trailer for Lars von Trier’s ‘Nymphomaniac: Volume I’

In an interview released in conjunction with his doomsday ballet Melancholia, Lars von Trier spoke of his interest in literature, proclaiming:

It’s an interesting point why the hell films have to be so stupid! Why do all lines have to be about something? A plot. When books have a red thread, they only brush it momentarily. And then again in a flash much later. Whereas a film is completely tied to the plot. Even a Tarkovsky film has nowhere near the same depth of a novel. It could be fun to make some of the novel’s qualities—even that they talk nineteen to the dozen, which is what I like in Dostoyevsky—and include that.

And for all the talk of its salacious nature and the lurid intrigue it has stirred amongst anxious and ardent fans, the most thrilling bit of truth is that Trier’s Nymphomaniac followed through precisely on his above statement—the five-hour epic existing in a world that’s fascinatingly novel-esque in its richness. Volume I,  which will be released theatrically and on VOD next month, is a cacophony of visceral emotion and brilliant storytelling that weaves together the tale of one woman’s life. It’s not only an exploration of desire and rebellion, but a story of the rituals we hold sacred that give way to addictions, yet remain the fire and the glue which keep our lives in their own personal tact. But more on that later.

In the meantime, you can now watch a new trailer for Nymphomaniac: Volume 1 and don’t forget to mark your calendar’s for its March 6th VOD release and the theatrical premiere on the 21st.

nymphomaniac-poster

The First Reviews for Lars von Trier’s Erotic Odyssey ‘Nymphomaniac’ Have Arrived

It’s been over two years since I sat in a room with Charlotte Gainsbourg and the cast of Lars von Trier’s last doomsday ballet masterpiece Melancholia. After we were done chatting about the film, Gainsbourg and Alexander Skarsgard shared the realization that she’d be starring in Lars’ next film alongside his father Stellan, saying she wasn’t even entirely sure of the plot but signed on because, well, it’s Lars. Naturally, I was intrigued. And in obsessively reading Nils Thorsen’s Longing for the End of the World interview with Lars, the notorious auteur said:

Why do all lines have to be about something? A plot. When books have a red thread, they only brush it momentarily! Whereas a film is completely tied to the plot. Even a Tarkovsky film has nowhere near the depth of a novel. It could be fun to take some of the novel’s qualities—even that they talk nineteen to the dozen, which is why I like—and include that.

I’m researching nymphomania. And Marquis de Sade. I’ve found that 40 percent of all nymphomaniacs are also cutters…But again, it’s politically incorrect to speak of nymphomania, because the concept in itself is seen to indicate that we cannot relate to female sexuality. As I understand, many of them cannot obtain satisfaction, so they use sex like cutting because it is something within their control. I suppose they carry around a fear or pain they conceal beneath…But it’s no fun if they’re humping away all the time, then it’ll just be a porn flick.

And in the same interview, he also went on to say that he gave Peter Aalbaek (with whom he co-founded Zentropa), “two titles: Shit in the Bedsore or The Nymphomaniac.” So there’s was.

But now, of course simply titled Nymphomaniac, after much anticipation, the first reviews of the film are in! So if you’re understandingly waiting to have the film reveal itself for you upon its US release, read no further. But if you’ve been teased too far and can’t help but give into your curiosity, take a look below.

VARIETY

Those familiar with von Trier’s work will pick up on connections between his earlier films and “Nymphomaniac,” as when Jerome’s offers to let Jo pursue her lost orgasm with other lovers — a point of overlap with Skarsgard’s unorthodox sexual arrangement in “Breaking the Waves.” In the nearly two decades since von Trier unveiled the Dogma 95 manifesto, his work has become increasingly provocative, from integrating real sex in “The Idiots” to figuratively shaking his fist at God with “Antichrist.” ….It’s one thing to declare sex a fact of life and insist that audiences confront their unease at seeing it depicted (or, equally constructive, their intense excitation at its mere mention), but quite another to fashion a fictional woman’s life around nothing but sex. As courageously depicted by Gainsbourg, Jo is ultimately a tragic character. In the film’s best-written scene, she outs a pedophile in deep denial of his own impulses, inadvertently revealing the irony (and promised moral crux) of her situation: Despite all the physical contact she achieves with strangers, Jo suffers from profound loneliness. Her story is a bid for a different sort of connection, over which the ever-cynical von Trier maintains the last laugh, sure to ring louder when the uncut version is unveiled next year.

THE GUARDIAN:

Hang on to your seat back, your Bible, or the hand of a friend. Lars von Trier‘s Nymphomaniac bludgeons the body and tenderises the soul. It is perplexing, preposterous and utterly fascinating; a false bill of goods in that it’s a film about sex that is deliberately unsexy and a long, garrulous story (two volumes, four hours) that largely talks to itself. Those naked figures in motion are just a distraction. To blunder in on Nymphomaniac is to catch the sight of a middle-aged Dane masturbating alone in a darkened room. It may be sensational, it might even be art. But I’m not sure it is intended for public consumption…How was it for you? How was it for me? Nymphomaniac doesn’t care. It goes about things its own way, in the service of its own pleasure, manhandling the audience from one position to the next, occasionally snickering at its own private jokes and daring us to decipher them. Personally I found this a bruising, gruelling experience and yet the film has stayed with me. It is so laden with highly charged set pieces, so dappled with haunting ideas and bold flights of fancy that it finally achieves a kind of slow-burn transcendence. Nymphomaniac annoys me, repels me, and I think I might love it. It’s an abusive relationship; I need to see it again.

INDIEWIRE:

By using music and split-screen in this sequence, as well as archival footage of animals and material specifically shot for the film, one senses both the childlike glee of von Trier as a filmmaker in full command of all the possibilities that his film has to offer and his interest in thinking things through. At its best, the film doesn’t strain for meaning but instead treats all of its intellectualizing as a lark that can be taken seriously but doesn’t need to be.

However, perhaps it’s best to bear in mind this line of dialog, also from chapter five and uttered by Joe: “How do you think you’ll get the most out of the story — by believing or not believing in it?”…After two earlier films with von Trier, “Antichrist” and “Melancholia,” this third collaboration represents Charlotte Gainsbourg’s most fearless and also finest hour as she carries the film with ease. To say her character isn’t easy to love would be an understatement, but Gainsbourg manages to turn Joe into more than just a mouthpiece of von Trier’s ideas. She’s a living, breathing human being who perhaps lacks the intellectual understanding to analyze what she’s doing or why she’s doing it — but whose will to live makes her forge ahead no matter what.

LITTLE WHITE LIES:

The depiction of sex is at all times a narratively essential illustration of Joe’s calling, chronicling the light, dark, funny and painful places that it takes her. 90 minutes are missing from this version and we can only guess at what this feature’s worth of missing run-time adds to the picture. ‘Nymphomania’ and its clinical alternative label ‘sex addiction’ are toyed with and it is down to the viewer to decide where the line is between a healthy appetite and something that might be deemed more pathological.

The film is not a perfect work and vacillates greatly in quality, particularly in Volume Two, but the successful sequences are so rich in thought-provoking representations of big subjects and so distinctively the work of its singular and taboo-flouting director that it all makes for essential viewing. 

TIME OUT LONDON:

Lars Von Trier’s wild, sprawling ‘Nymphomaniac’ is an orgy of the sublime and the ridiculous. It exists in two versions of differing lengths and explicitness. This is the first episode of a shorter, cleaner version (still, it’s unlikely to play in Dubai or Idaho). It opens with a disclaimer stating that the director wasn’t involved in the editing – although it has been cut with his permission from the longer, Lars-approved film. You feel short-changed: whose film is it then? What am I missing? Bigger cocks? More close-ups of injured, over-exercised clitorises? Oh yes, there’s nothing coy about it….Is there any sign here of a chastened Von Trier after the ‘I’m a Nazi’ scandal that engulfed him at Cannes in 2011? You only have to hear Skarsgård’s character musing on how non-active paedophiles ‘deserve a medal’ or see Gainsbourg sandwiched between two African immigrants with hard-ons to know the answer. He might not have been in control of the edit of this version of his film (the uncut version will emerge later), but the frank, unflinching and playful two-part ‘Nymphomaniac’ couldn’t have been made by anyone else.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER: 

In male-written literature, Don Juan-type characters have most often been portrayed with a certain amount of envy and admiration but with the moral caveat of having lived “empty” lives. With Joe, there is no sense of fun, of teasing, of enjoying her powers of manipulation. Nor does she exhibit genuine flirtatiousness or joie de vivre. Part of this no doubt stems from von Trier’s own heaviness and melancholic tendancies (although he has directed genuinely funny work, especially The Idiots), but it must also derives from newcomer Martin’s inexperience and pervasive inexpressiveness. The whole temperature of a film can be heavily influenced, even determined, by the heat a particular actress provides, so one can only wonder what Nymphomaniac would have been like had von Trier sought and found an equivalent of, say, Julie Christie in Billy Liar, Eva Green in The Dreamers or Jennifer Lawrence in almost anything…Novelistic in its chapter-designated structure, anecdotal richness and sensitivity to life’s different stages, Nymphomaniac nonetheless shortchanges its central figure by so narrowly defining her. Despite spending four hours with her, except when she’s with her father we seldom view her in anything but a sexual context; she never evinces any other interests and her reflective comments are invariably narcissistic, if negatively so.

In keeping with this, the entirely game Martin and Gainsbourg work in a tightly channeled emotional range, one that rarely allows Joe to look like she’s having any fun. For most people, sex is a diversion or escape from ordinary life and commonplace sensations; when you organize your life to squeeze in ten lovers per day, sex itself becomes the daily grind. Discovering the truth about herself finally brings Joe personal liberation in a certain way, but it still provides no happiness. The spiritual catharsis achieved by von Trier’s greatest heroine, Bess, in Breaking the Waves, eludes Joe, who remains a prisoner of the physical.

CINEUROPA:

A fascinating work despite it’s slightly chaotic side with a multitude of occult sub-readings and a few pointless provocations slipped in by Lars von Trier on the topic of his alleged anti-Semitism, Nymphomaniac – Part 1 is an added proof of the virtuosity of a filmmaker torn between the flesh and the spirit, a great disturbed artist working on the chaotic border between notions of good and evil, a director navigating from German metal band Rammstein to the sound of leaves rustling in the wind. A whole programme filled and consumed with excess (until the ultimate vanity of mentioning that the film is a “short and censured version”, “without his involvement”) that will hit European theatres as of December 25.

Essential Viewing: Watch Lars von Trier, Wim Wenders, & More in ‘FreeDogme’

Warning: this is the best.

Back in 1984, beloved German filmmaker Wim Wenders brought together a handful of film’s most iconic and brilliant minds—from Jean Luc-Godard to RW Fassbinder (just before his death)—to discuss the future of cinema. Titled Room 666, the 45-minute film makes you ache so badly to have been a fly on the wall in the Cannes hotel room in which they shot. But in a similar vein of cinematic discourse—and one that feels more candid and personal—in 2000 Marie Berthelius and Roger Narbonne made FreeDogme—a film in the form of a video conference call between  Lars von Trier, Win Wenders, Lone Scherfig, and Jean-Marc Barr—noting that Harmony Korine was supposed to show up to the party but was sadly absent.

Intended to explore the ways in which technology and its constant evolution effects the art of film and cinematic practice, we see the filmmakers in their personal spaces, stripped of the usual interview facades engaging in a conversation that’s both fascinating and inspiring, as well just absolutely delightful to watch. Smiling and more buoyant than we’re used to seeing, Lars is clad in a t-shirt and shorts outside in sunny nature, and claims that it was Wenders’ early work that inspired a large part of his desire to create Dogme95—to get back to a kind of poeticism and simplicity. Of course Wenders denies his responsibility in Dogme95, but says that most of the films he made in the beginning were not “necessary” and that attracted him to Dogme95’s aesthetic and sensibility was that Lars and his cohorts were making movies out of necessity again—and “with an existential approach.”

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Wim recollects of his early films, which again Lars found inspirational for Dogme 95, that they had an existential necessity he felt he subsequently lost, but that he was rediscovering via the technological innovations appropriated by, for instance, Dogme 95.  Wim is suggesting that the new technology again makes possible, for him, a kind of necessity to film.

Marie Berthelius asks Lars to sum up the “spirit” of the rules.  Lars replies “the spirit of the rules was only to have rules” because this would enable a withdrawal from conventions where “everything looks like everything.”  Dogme 95, in this sense, renews the artistic idea of making it new.  The rules were also intended to facilitate discussion about making films, for Lars, in the sense that, as in a church, a few central dogmas provide a common vocabulary, premised on shared background assumptions.

Participants discuss whether or not the Dogme 95 rules and technological constraints increase precision in the act of filming, and in what sense.

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So with all the teasing of Lars’ Nymphomaniac tickling away at you and the anticipation for Wenders’ Every Thing Will Be Fine running high, take a look at the wonderful cinematic exploration below.

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The Best Movies to Watch Without Ever Leaving Your Bed: Essential Psychological Dramas

Every Monday morning, I find myself whispering the old Beckett adage “I can’t go on, I’ll go on,” to myself as I settle down into work. No matter how thrilling the day’s prospects may be, it’s that midweek slump that always seems to rear its ugly head in the worst way. But never fear, the hours are sure to breeze on by and soon it will be the weekend—one that happens to be rife with fantastic films both premiering and screening around the city, thanks to new premieres and various wonderful retrospectives.

But in the meantime, what better way to spend an evening than curled up under the sheets enjoying the best of cinema—new modern masterpieces to enduring classics—from the comfort of your bed? And with myriad options to choose from on Netflix, Hulu, and iTunes, the nightly decision of what to show in your private bedroom screening can prove a challenge. So to make your time easier, I’ve rounded up your favorite psychological dramas about available to stream—peruse our list, get cozy, and enjoy.

http://youtu.be/VHPKe8D01Kk
MULHOLLAND DRIVE, David Lynch (iTunes)


REPULSION, Roman Polanski (Hulu)


FIGHT CLUB, David Fincher (iTunes)


A WOMAN UNDER THE INFLUENCE, John Cassavetes (Hulu)

http://youtu.be/L8EoFamzmtc
EYES WIDE SHUT, Stanley Kubrick (iTunes)


REQUIEM FOR A DREAM, Darren Aronofsky (Netflix)


LOST HIGHWAY, David Lynch (iTunes)


THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY, Ingmar Bergman (Hulu)


ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOOS NEST, Milos Forman (iTunes)

http://youtu.be/vKA_4iycWq4
THREE COLORS RED, Krzysztof Kieslowski (Hulu)


BLUE VELVET, David Lynch (iTunes)


AUTUMN SONATA, Ingmar Bergman (Hulu)


TAXI DRIVER, Martin Scorsese (iTunes)


BLACK SWAN, Darren Aronofsky (iTunes)


THE BITTER TEARS OF PETRA VON KANT, RW Fassbinder (Hulu)


PI, Darren Aronofsky (Netflix)


MEMENTO, Christopher Nolan (Netflix)


THE PIANO TEACHER, Michael Haneke (Hulu)


MELANCHOLIA, Lars von Trier (Netflix)


SAFE, Todd Haynes (Youtube)


OSLO, AUGUST 31ST, Joachim Trier (Hulu)


LAST TANGO IN PARIS, Bernardo Bertolucci (Netflix)


MAGNOLIA, Paul Thomas Anderson (iTunes)


8 1/2, Federico Fellini (Netflix)

http://youtu.be/OZE9nptJykQ
INTERIORS, Woody Allen (iTunes)


LA NOTTE, Michelangelo Antonioni (iTunes)


THE TRUMAN SHOW, Peter Weir (Netflix)


NAKED LUNCH, David Cronenberg (iTunes)

Lars von Trier’s ‘Nymphomaniac’ Gets a Hardcore NSFW First Trailer

For well over a year now, we’ve been talking endlessly about the Lars von Trier sexual odyssey Nymphomaniac. And today, all that teasing has given way to some pleasure with the first trailer for the film. Although the Charlotte Gainsbourg-led tale will hit theaters in Denmark on Christmas, unfortunately we’re still without an official US release date—but let’s hope that one’s sooner rather than later.

I’d say more here, but I’m far too jazzed with anticipation by this brief preview. So have a look at it for yourself. And just one question: Would it be alright if I showed the children the whoring bed?

PS. This is certainly NSFW, so hide under your desk.

http://youtu.be/LSOONAsCG0U

Lars von Trier’s ‘Nymphomaniac’ Gets a Sexual Set of Character Posters

With just a few months left before its Christmas Day release in Denmark, Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac continues to tease. After numerous photos, chapter clips, and speculation, the five-hour sexual odyssey now has an extensive set of pleasurable character posters. Well, not so much pleasurable as bizarrely mid-climax but nevertheless another treat in a continuous trail of breadcrumbs leading up to the film’s US release. We see the entire cast, from Charlotte Gainsbourg to Christian Slater in their own one-sheets for the:

…wild and poetic story of a woman’s erotic journey from birth to the age of 50 as told by the main character, the self-diagnosed nymphomaniac, Joe (Gainsbourg). On a cold winter’s evening the old, charming bachelor, Seligman (Skarsgård), finds Joe beaten up in an alley. He brings her home to his flat where he cares for her wounds while asking her about her life. He listens intently as Joe over the next 8 chapters recounts the lushly branched-out and multi-faceted story of her life, rich in associations and interjecting incidents.
 
See some of the new posters below and check out the rest HERE.
 
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