Life, Faith, & Jewelry: Meet Vita Fede Designer Cynthia Sakai

It’s the day before the Billboard Music Awards, and Cynthia Sakai has been hard at work pulling pieces from her wildly popular jewelry line, Vita Fede (life & faith in Italian), to adorn the likes of Selena Gomez, Alicia Keys, Avril Lavigne, Ke$ha, and Jessica Alba for the big event.

“They are such a diverse group of women, but the beauty of Vita Fede is anyone can take our pieces and mix them into their own style,” says Sakai over the phone from her L.A. office. The number of famous women photographed in her pieces read like a laundry list of who’s who: Rihanna, Kristen Stewart, Jennifer Lawrence, Angelina Jolie, Nicki Minaj, Mindy Kaling, and Anne Hathaway, to name a few. 

Vita Fede’s Italian-made creations have amassed an army of celebrity du jour devotees any designer would kill for. And just imagine: these priceless endorsements were acquired without a powerhouse PR team behind the brand wooing these sought-after clients. Sakai’s understated and timeless collection is enough to have celebrities contacting her office.

“Probably eight out of 10 calls or emails we get is about pieces they wore on a photo shoot,” she notes. Like the time Victoria Beckham’s assistant called from a magazine shoot to buy a ring Beckham just had to own.

Sakai insists that she doesn’t put more weight on her rich and famous fans than she does her average customers (“It’s all exciting, really!’). She often searches Instagram’s Vita Fede hashtags to see how people are stacking the different pieces, and often leaves comments.

“Social media has played a big role for us. It was really organic and nothing that we even planned,” she says when talking about the company’s substantial social media presence. “As opposed to magazines where an editor or a stylist curates the pieces, social media is just normal customers showing you what they like. It’s real genuine.”

But when she got an email about styling Gwyneth Paltrow for the Iron Man 3 premiere and the actresses’ book signing event, she admits to being very thrilled at the opportunity to work with the red-carpet veteran. “I just love her and her style. She is so chic.”

In the last two years, Vita Fede has been the first name in chic costume jewelry, leading the shift from the over-embellished designs that have dominated, to the clean and modern aesthetic that has now become de rigueur in fashion.

Although, when Saki first launched her line back in 2009, the feedback was less than welcoming for her brand of geometric accessories at a time when boho and vintage was the all the rage.

“People would ask why don’t you make things with beads, strings, or embroidery. That just wasn’t what I liked or would wear,” she recalls.

In fact, the line’s signature piece, the Titan, a hinged bangle with distinctive cone details, was deemed ugly by her Italian factory and outdated by her own business partner.

“When it came in, no one liked it or even noticed it for the first year.” Fast forward to the last year-and-a-half, and the Titan has reached “It” status, eliciting “ooohs and ahhhs” from celebrities, bloggers, and everyone in between.

Vita Fede’s pièce de resistance has since ignited a slew of knockoffs.  “I knew the Titan was very cool. It’s a classic piece with a bit of an edge that works for all women.” Sakai credits a button on her grandmother’s vintage dress as inspiration for the successful design. The Titan has since evolved into a whole family, with a myriad of iterations that include crystals and onyx.

The Titan wasn’t the first time Sakai – who launched her first accessories line when she was only 18 designing pretty cases to discreetly carry tampons – had a stroke of silhouette genius. Vita Fede was founded thanks to her unique ability to see beauty and retail potential in the unexpected.

“When I owned a showroom back in 2008, a friend gave me a bracelet from Italy and I just knew that I could sell it.” Her gifted leather-and-chain bracelet was a ubiquitous tourist souvenir sold in Italy for years, but when she got her hands on them and added her personal touch – new colors and metallic hardware – the bracelets, which she named Vita, crossed over from run-of-the-mill to fashionable.

“We sold 10,000 of them in the showroom and they were featured in every magazine. I had no intention of starting a line, but people were always asking me what’s next?”

Taking cues from the impeccably dressed Japanese women in her life such as her mother, who worked at Fendi and was involved in opening Fendi stores in the States, her grandmother and great-grandmother, Sakai was determined to lend a sophisticated sensibility to costume jewelry with Vita Fede.

“They all used to have their ready-to-wear tailor made, so quality and longevity was really instilled in me,” she points out. Her father, a former architect, no doubt had a role in Sakai’s love of clean lines and sculptural shapes.

Her American L.A. roots, is evident in the wearability of her line. You can pair one of her bracelets or rings as easily with a cocktail dress as you can with jeans. She strays from designing complicated special-occasion pieces and leans more towards an effortlessly modern and sleek European style she adopted on her many trips abroad.

“I wanted to create a line that both fashion and classic girls could wear every day,” she reveals. “Vita Fede makes a statement without being overbearing or in-your-face.”

Nailing that anonymously unpretentious look requires the intricate labor of five factories in Italy, whom also work with elite fashion brands like Céline, Saint Laurent, and Givenchy, to produce Vita Fede’s hand-crafted jewels. A single piece takes about six to eight weeks to bring to life.

Now that Sakai has succeeded in bringing craftsmanship back to costume jewelry, she is now set on eschewing the stuffiness of fine jewelry, and hopes to make it more relevant with her new upscale Black Label. The small inaugural collection is scheduled to launch in the US and Europe.

“When I go to a fine jewelry store, I still get that old, dated feeling of a tennis bracelet,” she says.  “Our customers who like to stack their Cartier and diamonds with Vita Fede are a bit hipper. They are looking for something that is not too edgy but still very cool.  We are working with black and clear diamonds and pink, white and solid gold.”

As for Vita Fede, the new pre-fall collection will consist “of a little more bling.” Sakai will also be adding more earrings to the mix and introducing a new cut-out design, inspired by a vintage ring her mother wore in the ‘60s, that will highlight more skin. We can also expect evening clutches to complement the jewelry collection in the near future.

Vita Fede is quietly poised to take over the costume jewelry world. In between working on these three new collections, Sakai is in the midst of launching the European markets, opening showrooms in Milan, Paris, and London.

The company is growing at warp speed, but multi-tasker Sakai plays it cool under pressure.  As if her day of Skype meetings, checking in on the factories, pulling pieces for clients, and chatting with me for this interview wasn’t enough, she casually mentions that she is also in the process of moving offices today.

“It’s just in a day’s work. I call it ‘organized chaos.’”

Book It Now: Where To Eat, Stay, & Play At Cannes Film Festival

On May 15th, the two-week, invite-only film festival lands in Cannes. While the Cannes Film Festival honors films worldwide and across all genres, it’s historically honored the following: nipple slips on the Oscar-worthy red carpet, magazine cover-worthy poses by Selma Hayek at the annual Vanity Fair party, and covert make-outs between Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson. But of greater concern is what you will be doing: where you will eat, stay, and play while attending (or observing from your beach umbrella) the festival. Here are Cannes’ most in-demand hotels, restaurants, and clubs. Book them now. 

Walter Salles’ ‘On the Road’ Will Be Released Again This Month, Check Out a New Clip

Well, for those of you that didn’t get to see Walter Salles meandering adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, don’t worry—it’s coming back. After a planned wide release last December, the expansio was thwarted for one reason or another and will now be released again this spring. So in case you missed the film the first time around, new promotional clips have made their way online and this latsest one, courtesy of MTV, shows Kristen Stewart’s Marylou and Garrett Hedlund’s Dean in an intimate moment in the backseat of a car, naturally. The film is now apparently whittled down from its original Cannes running time, which will hopefully add some vigor to the picture.

When I spoke with Salles back in October, he told me that in crafting his adaptation of Kerouac’s iconic beat novel, he recognized that, "like jazz, where the instrument is an extension of the muscian," since Kerouac had a writing style in which the typewriter was an extension of himself.  So in order to bring that vitality and energy to life, the film had to have an “impressionistic quality,” keeping the camera close to the actor’s body, aiming to connect the audience with the character’s experience. 

And although he made a valiant effort here, I recalled that there was a "gnawing dissonance between reading the author’s words and hearing them recited in a film. Reading On the Road is an intimate and thrilling experience, but an inevitable amount of magic is lost in the translation as it plays out onscreen. Despite the fact that the long and winding road to the novel’s cinematic debut satisfies our visual curiosities of the text, it raises the question: are some parts of the road better left unpaved."

Anyway, check out the new clip from On the Road which you can see on VOD or when it hits theaters March 22nd

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‘Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part 2’ Sweeps The Razzies

Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part 2 went out with a bang: the last film in the vampiric series swept the Razzies last night, taking home seven "anti-Academy Awards."

Kristen Stewart picked up the Razzie for Worst Actress, Taylor Lautner for Best Supporting Actor, and Bill Condon got a Razzie for Worst Director. Launter and MacKenzie Fox, who plays Bella and Edward’s daughter Renesmee, won Worst Onscreen Couple. And the whole cast can share the glory of winning Worst Film and Worst Ensemble Cast. 

Twilight didn’t hog the entire awards show, however: Adam Sandler won Worst Actor for That’s My Boy and Rihanna won Worst Supporting Actress for Battleship

Alas, none of the winners made it to the Razzies to pick up their awards — unlike Sandra Bullock, who famously accepted her Worst Actress award for All About Steve in 2010 and Halle Berry for Catwoman in 2004. Perhaps the cast of Twilight was too busy rolling on their piles of money. 

Contact the author of this post at Jessica.Wakeman@Gmail.com. Follow me on Twitter.

Pop-Culture Parody Musicals Are as Meta as We Get

Growing up in the ‘90s and early ‘00s, I had really weird taste in music. Sure, I liked whatever the Top 40 pop hits were, but I also belted out showtunes, and I had every word memorized of “Weird Al” Yankovic’s song parodies. Through his ode to food “Eat It,” I learned how badass young Michael Jackson was. Likewise, I would never have known what “MacArthur Park” without the cheeky "Jurassic Park.”

In a 2003 interview with NPR, Yankovic mused on how his fellow artists would respond as he prepped each album of song parodies. “At this point I’ve got a bit of a track record,” he said. “So people realize that when ‘Weird Al’ wants to go parody, it’s not meant to make them look bad… it’s meant to be a tribute.”

While it seems as if “Weird Al” has hung up the accordion for the time being, there are plenty of creative teams who have adopted that same motivation of writing silly lyrics to poke fun at pop culture and elevated it to the next logical incarnation—the musical. In the past few years, more and more pop culture parody musicals have popped up on the Internet, in universities, and even off-Broadway. They’ve launched the careers of stars like Darren Criss (who played the starring role in A Very Potter Musical), and even famous folks like Joss Whedon (with Doctor Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog) have joined in.

Pop culture has passed into an incredibly self-reflective and meta phase. We can’t watch a TV show or political debate without immediately reacting through GIF form and then scrutinizing our reaction. We’re compelled to interrogate the highbrow and especially the lowbrow works that capture our attention. But it gets boring and one-dimensional to use the same medium that we’re discussing in our analysis. We’re constantly turning our opinions over and over, seeking out the smart new angle that someone hasn’t thought of. Enter this new breed of musical.

We’re lucky that many of these productions have tested the waters in New York City, where you can stage an outrageous parody for even just a weekend. In the past year, I’ve taken in four shows that probe the boundaries of good taste and challenge the books, actors, and even religious institutions they mock. Last Christmas, I joined the throngs of theatergoers laughing so hard they were crying at Trey Parker and Matt Stone’s The Book of Mormon. Since the, I’ve also giggled my way through song-and-dance parodies of Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight series, its offspring Fifty Shades of Grey, and the ‘90s thriller The Silence of the Lambs.

Whether each show’s attack is sweet or snarky, there is indeed that sense of tribute that Yankovic mentioned—cheeky nods to the genre of musical theater itself, or a hat tip to the impact Clarice Starling or Anastasia Steele has had on pop culture. In fact, 50 Shades! The Musical pokes fun less at Ana’s whirlwind romance with Christian Grey, and more at the way Americans have gobbled up E.L. James’ erotic fanfiction.

“I think anything that is so popular that everyone knows about it, you can start to home in on certain details,” said Emily Dorezas, one of the 50 Shades co-writers. “That’s why, as soon as the presidential election starts, everybody can laugh at the same things about the different candidates. Fifty Shades of Grey is just this brand that doesn’t go away. Even if you know nothing about it, you know everything about it. Part of what we’re doing is making fun of the phenomenon of it. [Audiences] can laugh at that because they’ve seen it in their house, with their wives and girlfriends.”

Twilight: The Musical employs a similar shorthand: They’re betting on audiences’ familiarity with the movies so that they can skewer not only Bella Swan and Edward Cullen, but also Robert Pattinson’s insanely dramatic delivery and Kristen Stewart’s penchant for lip biting. The more layers you can work through, the better you’re rewarded, like when Edward and Bella’s literary contemporaries Harry Potter, Ron Weasley, and Hermione Granger pop in to declare a wizards-versus-vampires war.

When you’re addressing the young adult fiction booms of the past fifteen years, of course you have to poke fun at the consumers who waited in line at midnight for the new books and movies. But how do you mock a solid film classic from the ‘90s that’s entirely straight-faced and even rather terrifying? You make it self-aware.

What most struck me about Silence! The Musical (which has existed online and onstage since 2002) is that it follows the movie beat-for-beat. I was especially aware because I had watched the film for the first time just a few weeks prior. Aside from the addition of a lamb chorus—paralleling the ancient Greek chorus and performing the same duty of commenting on the action onstage—the musical starts and ends where the movie does. Watching it, you’re delightfully surprised to realize that it is kind of ridiculous to start a movie with Jodie Foster huffing and puffing through the woods near Quantico, and that most of Anthony Hopkins’ dialogue is snarky one-liners. The cast turns even the most innocuous phrasing into a punchline; currently, Pamela Bob amps up Clarice’s unfortunate lisp to an art form.

The decision to do a shot-for-shot spoof had less to do with the movie itself and more with how co-writers Jon and Al Kaplan write all of their parodies. “We’re very detail-oriented,” the brothers said of what began as a collection of songs and evolved into a screenplay. “We focus on details and blow them up. It’s meant to be a love letter to the movie; we want to tailor it to people who are big fans.” It helped that Hunter Bell, who wrote the book for the stage show, and original director Christopher Gattelli had the same M.O.: “They love the movie and wanted to focus on the details—sometimes different details [from us].”

To be fair, the brothers were wary of audience reaction to some of the songs. But when the original movie brings Lecter and Clarice together after another inmate comments on her vagina, how can you not give Lecter a love song called “If I Could Smell Her Cunt”? However, it wasn’t until Book of Mormon opened in 2010 that the Kaplans felt more secure about their bawdier musical numbers.

“I think we’re proudest of Lecter’s song,” the Kaplans said. “It’s not the typical song you would expect from him, the ‘liver and fava beans’ number. It’s the moment where the audience really has to buy into the concept or not buy into it. It has to be well performed; Lecter has to really sell it as a love song. We’re also proud of Buffalo Bill’s song ‘I’d Fuck Me’ because it came late in the game. We felt like we had already written our Buffalo Bill songs.”

”I’d Fuck Me” represents perhaps the closest adherence to the source material. Our audience was on the edge of their seats during this swirly burlesque number because we all knew the iconic sequence from the film and were waiting with bated breath to see if David Ayers would attempt the infamous dick tuck. When he did, that prompted the most cheers out of any point in the show. Honestly, we wouldn’t have respected the creative team if they hadn’t included that moment.

Each of these shows has unlocked a new take on the source material through the medium of the musical. The visual nature of a stage show has been most beneficial for 50 Shades! The Musical. One of the book’s most ludicrous elements was Anastasia’s “inner goddess,” the subconscious manifestation of her repressed horniness. Sadly, she was absent from the New York production, but Dorezas said that she showed up in Chicago in “a scene with Christian and Anastasia, [where] the inner goddess comes in and basks to have this whole moment to herself,” and that she’ll appear in future iterations.

Some of the most fun that the 50 Shades! The Musical cast and creative team had was subverting the audience’s expectations of the characters’ appearances. For the past year or more, fansites have cast achingly smoldering types like Ian Somerhalder and Alexis Bledel for Christian and Ana, but what makes Chris Grace and Amber Petty’s portrayals so refreshing is that neither are stereotypical beauties. They play up the comedic contrast between the prose and their onstage looks and behavior.

“It was totally a conscious decision,” Dorezas confirmed. “I don’t think anybody’s gonna be 100 percent satisfied with whatever Christian Grey they choose [for the movie]. We just wanted to go the complete opposite direction, but Chris plays it so sexy, and he owns it! There’s a certain point where it’s like, ‘This is our Christian Grey, and everyone in the audience is sold on it.’

”It’s always my favorite when he walks onstage for the first time, ‘cause you see the audience pointing at each other like, ‘Oh my God, this isn’t what you said!’ I know they think Ryan Gosling is gonna come out there. I think in Chris’ mind, he thinks he’s Ryan Gosling. And Amber as Anastasia—she’s so funny. We wanted it to be more of a wink at these characters, not the actual characters. I think if we went for super hot and sexy, we’d lose funny.”

Similarly, the writers grappled with the first draft because if they gave in to the temptation to absolutely skewer James’s admittedly ridiculous novel, they wouldn’t be able to keep an audience. “I think the first round, we felt like there was just too much punch and not enough heart to it,” Dorezas said, citing their shared experience in the comedy world. “We wanted the audience to want these two people to be together outside of a bondage/S&M situation.”

The parody can’t just be about the content; the creative teams must also consider conventions of musical theater itself. One of the first big laughs in The Book of Mormon is “Hasa Diga Eebowai,” a seemingly joyous African chant that brings to mind The Lion King’s “Hakuna Matata” but actually translates to “Fuck You, God.” Mocking religion was one thing, but dragging the esteemed medium of musical theater into the mix? That’s when audiences realized that no one was safe.

In the New York production of 50 Shades! The Musical, the inner goddess got sacrificed in favor of a big, Les Miserables-esque ensemble number. “We just had to find another place for the inner goddess, ‘cause we all were like, ‘Ah, we want this moment where everyone’s having doubt and not sure what to do,’” Dorezas said. “There’s a nod to Phantom of the Opera in the show, as well. We definitely put little things in there that even if you’re not a fan of Fifty Shades of Grey, if you’re a fan of musicals you’ll appreciate the moments as well. If some of the moments are too insidery—you don’t know who Jose is when he walks in, you don’t know Christian is against type—there’s still something for you.”

The Kaplan brothers’ nods to musical theater occur more in the fabric of the musical’s choreography: “It’s just integrating little homages here and there. There’s A Chorus Line in ‘In the Dark with a Maniac,’ [with] the dance move that Clarice does before she shoots Buffalo Bill. There’s also [elements from] The King and I.”

Now, a lot of the musical theater greats are dead and can’t defend themselves against this mockery. But how about the creators of the books and movies parodied? Despite the hard-R nature of Silence! The Musical, the Kaplans said that several of the people involved with the movie found it uproariously funny.

For one, director Jonathan Demme decided to celebrate his twenty-year crew reunion by going to the show. “We sat behind them, and they were laughing their heads off,” the Kaplans said. “It was a real kick… We thought he was gonna be a really serious guy, just sitting there scowling, but he’s got a real sense of humor.” They can’t vouch for Jodie Foster’s reaction, since she attended a different show. However, “Anthony Heald, who played Dr. Chilton, was very enthusiastic, said he would love to play his character in a future reincarnation of the show. Anthony Hopkins, as far as we know, hasn’t gone.”

”We did look toward Silence! The Musical a little bit in terms of what they were able to get away with,” Dorezas said. Because the original production of 50 Shades! The Musical debuted at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, they’ve been caught up with UK copyright laws, combined with the reaction from James’ people. “For the UK opportunities that we are currently discussing, we could change some things around with the show that would make it fall under safe parameters,” Dorezas said. “If the parody laws change in our favor, then we would not have to do that. We have an idea of what we can do, but we’re kind of waiting to see how it changes.”

Musical parody reinvigorates seemingly played-out stories because it’s such an unexpected medium. It’s likely that the first time you saw Clarice Starling or read about Christian Grey, you never dreamed that either would break into song. These pop culture parody musicals crack these seemingly solemn characters and give them the added dimensions to ensure their endurance in the zeitgeist, whether they’re twenty or two years old. As the Kaplans confessed, “We never thought we’d be talking about this eleven years after the fact.”

Follow Natalie Zutter on Twitter.

What Kristen Stewart Is Not Thankful For, In Her Own Words

This Thanksgiving, Kristen Stewart shares what she’s not thankful for. From a series of appearances, premieres, and interviews,  we’ve gathered the top things Stewart will not be praising at her Thanksgiving table. Here they are  – in her own words.

1. Being really hot effortlessly.

“I go outside, and I’m wearing a funky T-shirt and my hair is dirty, and people say, ‘What’s wrong with her? She needs to invest in a hairbrush.’" 

2. Living a charmed life.

“ I feel boring. I feel like, ‘Why is everything so easy for me?’ I can’t wait for something crazy to fucking happen to me. Just life. I want someone to fuck me over. Do you know what I mean?"

3. Having a beloved fanbase.

“Girls are scary. Large groups of girls scare the crap out of me.”

4. Being a part of the Twilight empire. 

“I feel like it’s not going anywhere. It is strange. But things shouldn’t stay stagnant. You’ve got to move on.”

5. Her father’s pride.

“Oh, he loves that I’m famous. He’s a total fame whore. Even if I’m not with him.  he’s like, ‘Hey, I’m John. Stewart. Father of Kristen… Have you ever seen Twilight? Yeah, well, that’s my kid!’ It’s the most embarrassing thing in the world.”

6. Having sex with Robert Pattinson

“The sex scenes were silly, very silly.”

7. Cameras. 

Kristen Stewart

From The Sex Scene To The Twist Ending: ‘Breaking Dawn Part 2’ Is Epic

Here are some things you need to know about Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part 2.

1.     There’s a sex scene that makes you feel like you took E and a hit of a bong, drank a milkshake, and are discovering human touch for the first time in your life. This song plays the entire time.

2.     Every part involving Bella & Edward’s child Renesmee Cullen melts your heart into a tiny puddle of butter and love.

3.     Out-of-place clothing choices:

– In one scene, Robert Pattinson wears a hoodie that looks like he just cleaned out his garage.

– In one of the last scenes, Kristen Stewart wears a dowdy striped shirt with her hair messily up as if she just mopped up Renesmee’s spilled apple juice.

4.     In the opening scene, this song plays, restoring your faith in the magic of life, synth, and light reggae beats.

5.     There’s a twist ending that will blow your mind and it’s too epic to talk about.

I hope you’re ready…

Kristen Stewart Thinks Your Critiques Of ‘Twilight’ Are All Wrong

Okay. So. In fairness, Kristen Stewart said this stuff while sitting next to Twilight series author Stephenie Meyer in a promotional event for Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part Two. That’s not the ideal time or place for a substantive critique of the material. But as Stewart defended Bella and Edward’s relationship as "entirely equal," I had to wonder whether we had read the same books and watched the same movies.

As quoted on Jezebel, Stewart responded thusly to a question about whether the intensity of Bella and Edward’s love affair was sending a bad message to young women: 

Flop the roles. If Bella was a vampire and Edward was the human and you changed nothing but the genders, none of that criticism would exist. It would be ‘Wow, he just laid everything on the line for her. It’s so amazing, and it must take such strength to subject yourself to that.’ Also, the relationship is entirely equal.

Side-eye, right?

I’m embarrassed to say I’ve seen all the Twilight films thus far and read most of the books. Thus, I do think that an argument can be made in defense of Stewart’s comments if you look at the themes in the books conceptually, rather than in specifics. Conceptually, the books are about two young lovers who sacrifice everything for each other. In that way, they are equal. Bella is a resolute and passionate character and I do think she is at times unfairly criticized as "weak." 

But there are numerous specific incidents in the stories in which Edward’s behavior towards Bella is problematic — not just because it is controlling, but because it is controlling in ways men have historically controlled women. The gender dynamic between them does matter. Numerous times in the movies Edward physically prevents her from doing things, he is possessive and jealous around Jacob the werewolf, and he withholds sex from her (despite her insistence she is not physically harmed by it) because he knows what’s best. All of those are items you most definitely could find on a "cycle of abuse" chart in any domestic violence counselor’s office. And if we’re going to loop Jacob into the critique, I found it extremely disconcerting how  involved he got in Bella and Edward’s sex life in the latest film, as well. Men being possessive in their protectiveness of women is most certainly an overarching theme.

It’s not so simple to just "flop the roles," as Stewart insisted. To "flop the roles" suggests men and women have always been completely equal. It ignores the centuries of male domination which are the reason people find aspects the characters’ behavior problematic in the first place.

I personally don’t look to Hollywood actresses for critiques of gender. But in this incidence, I’m disappointed in how off Kristen Stewart got it. 

Contact the author of this post at Jessica.Wakeman@Gmail.com. Follow me on Twitter.

Robsten Predictably Awkward About ‘Breaking Dawn: Part 2’ Sex Scene

Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart gave their first interview together since the cheating scandal — or "cheating scandal" — broke this July. If you guessed anything had changed since then, you guessed wrong. The two are still both unenthusiastic and sardonic and predictably awkward.

MTV asked the pair about the sex scene in Breaking Dawn: Part 2 and how it compared to the honeymoon sex scene in Breaking Dawn: Part 1. Not that I’ve seen the Twilight movies or anything, but … in Part 1, Bella is still a human, so sex with Edward is so rough it breaks the headboard and covers her arms with bruises. (And then Bella spends the rest of the honeymoon moping about how Edward won’t have sex with her, which frankly, is grounds for divorce right there.) 

I think we can assume from the chummy demeanor that MTV agreed not to ask the two about the cheating and the split. Yay for journalism. Here they are below:

Contact the author of this post at Jessica.Wakeman@Gmail.com. Follow me on Twitter.