The Top NYE Parties In NYC

Look, don’t stress. Who cares that your trip to Miami fell through, your sister announced she’s visiting, or your best friend you were going to eat Chinese food with bailed on you for a guy she met on the F train. It’s okay. You can still reclaim an unstoppable NYE night and New Year at one of these top New Year’s Eve parties in NYC. From rock anthems, to tarot cards, to monkeys, to lavish five-hour open bars – we’ve got you covered, and you will be okay. Tipsy and making as many poor decisions before your resolutions as possible, but okay.

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Rudolf Piper Is Alive in Brazil

When I was king of the forest, and a young bright person would come to me with aspirations of a career in nightlife, I would make them listen to a little ditty: “I will hire you, but you must understand that nightlife is like a roller coaster. You spend a little money to get on the ride and the first thing it does is it takes you up a great hill from which you think you can see the whole world. It broadens your horizons, and the anticipation of what lies ahead is a huge adrenaline rush. Then you plunge headlong into it—fast and fun, steep curves, and drops and spills, and you have barely enough time to catch your breath or see much else. Suddenly it’s over, and you basically went around in a circle and didn’t get anywhere, and the only person to really make any money is the guy who owns the thing.” For the great majority of aspiring Steve Rubells or Noah Tepperbergs, that’s all she wrote. Some are satisfied with the gal above their pay grade or the recognition at the club du jour’s door, but few make a real career from it. I was very lucky to have worked for so many brilliant men who did, and Rudolf Piper was as good as they get.

He understood the money end and never let it get in the way. He knew without the bucks there would be no Buck Rogers, but he was an artist first. The clubs were a canvas that sometimes sold for lots of loot and sometimes a little less. The value of art is not necessarily in its price tag. I think Andy Warhol would have disagreed. I think Andy felt its value was in its ability to generate cash, but although Andy did something in almost every creative field, he never ran a joint. Nowadays, few operate places for little more than the money, and maybe the gals. There is nothing wrong with that, but it has led to the migration of the creative types to other boroughs—or even hemispheres. Rudolf Piper now resides in playful, hedonistic Brazil. He is making money there for club operators from NY, Miami, and elsewhere. He takes familiar brands visited by South Americans during the warm weather when they migrate north, and recreates them near their home. Yesterday I gave Rudolf 15 minutes of fame, and today I’ll give him another 15. Andy wouldn’t have minded. Rudolf is a man for all seasons, a bon vivant. He found himself in a paradise and furnished it to his tastes.

When operators look for a name of some garage or warehouse that will be “the place to be” for a few years, they no longer think small. They envision their brand in Vegas, or Miami, or Atlantic City – or with Rudolf’s help – Brazil. A name must transcend the boundaries of Manhattan’s rivers. It must be able to travel and be relevant elsewhere, wherever the party people live and play. Sometimes it’s merely a pop-up at Sundance or Cannes, but often it is a full blown joint in a faraway land. I learned much from my mentor, Mr. Rudolf Piper, and I apparently have a great deal more to learn. He invited me to visit him way down there, but I had to decline. I’m just getting used to Brooklyn, which feels like a foreign (but absolutely wonderful) country to me. Besides, from what my old boss has been telling me, I’m not sure i would ever come back. I often say you can only live one life. My old pal once again proves me wrong. Like an old cat, he survives continually and recreates himself and the world around him. I asked him a few questions via modern technology.

So, how does it feel doing club business in Brazil? First and foremost, it’s fun, sexy and lucrative. Meaning, it’s better than in many other places in the world. The economic crisis never arrived, or has been extraordinarily late in coming, so the economy is booming. Here, everybody that has money is really nouveau-riche, and therefore prone to spend a lot on lifestyle. It’s no secret that Brazilian girls are ultra-sexy, so that takes care of that. One generally overlooked factor is that the local population is of a joyous nature: they are happy, easygoing, and welcoming, and that’s a major differential. What other countries in the world could be labeled as “happy”? If you think about it, I’d say that there is almost none. So, it’s much better to live in a place where people are party-oriented, than in places where they are weird or depressed.

You have specialized in licensing foreign club brands in Brazil. How did that happen? It all started because Jeffrey Jah was trying to install a Lotus club in São Paulo in 2005. He was having difficulties, because a lot of the investors did not speak English down there. Then, at my birthday dinner at the Bowery Bar in 2005, where you and Jah apparently made up, I was sitting right next to Jeffrey and he got a call from Brazil, and he passed the phone to me. My Portuguese is impeccable, don’t ask me why because the story is too long. In any case, suddenly I was thrown into the middle of this project, and loved every minute of it. Then, that same night, some bizarre queen came out of nowhere and trashed our entire table setup, remember? Well, that incident gave me a good feeling about this whole plan, and I’ve been south of the border ever since then. There were many branches of Lotus down there. What other places did you license? Yes, Lotus had clubs in São Paulo, Guarujá, Salvador, Campo Grande, Campinas and Campos do Jordão. A nightmare to control. Then, I licensed Buddha Bar from Paris, owing to my friendship with Raymond Visan, who just passed away a few days ago. Later, I was briefly part of Pink Elephant-Brazil, and then purchased the Mokai brand from Miami. Recently, I was involved in the development of Kiss & Fly, which is now going to Punta del Este too. Currently, I’m working to open SET, from Miami, for next year, and I have some more things up my sleeve.

Talk about the strategy behind bringing these brands to Brazil. It definitively makes money and sense. Brazil is still a class-divided society, and the upper echelon is well-informed, has money to burn, and does not like to hear samba in their clubs. They travel a lot, and once back home, they want that same house music and DJs they listened to abroad. In a nutshell, they really want that NY club they liked so much in their own backyard. So, I took it upon myself to bring those venues over. How do you hook up with a foreign brand and how do you select which club you want to approach? First of all, I do research amongst the target clientele, to see which U.S. clubs seem to excite them most. And they always want American clubs, because nobody really knows what clubs are trendy in Europe. Once I have three or four possible candidates, I fly over and start negotiations with the people from NY or Miami. Normally, some 50% of the selected venues clinch a deal. The reason why the other places don’t is because they charge too much or create obstacles. Many fail to see that a licensing deal for Brazil is like money found on the street. They get concerned about the image of their brand, forgetting that most American clubs have only a short lifespan, so what possible damage could Brazil do to them? Others start preparing complicated contracts, some gigantic legal monuments that nobody in Brazil will sign. The rule of thumb is “easy does it.”

So, once you have signed a US brand and secured a property in Brazil, what do you do next? I start doing all those things that you do so well here in NY, like drawing up plans, getting additional investors, hiring contractors, decorating, starting initial promotion and presswork. As a matter of fact, I consider myself to be the Steve Lewis of Brazil! Well, thank you, I guess I’m flattered! It feels good to know that I became a mentor to my old mentor somehow. Now, changing subjects radically, let me ask you a question that a lot of our friends have been wondering about. Why, after so many successful clubs in the 1980’s, did you suddenly leave NY in 1991 without notice? They didn’t run you out of town, did they? To be honest, I think I did! No, seriously, there were a few reasons. First, I believed that the magic of NY had evaporated by then. Boy, was I right. Second, I realized that nightlife was subject to cycles of trendiness, which ended abruptly and was substituted by new ones. Most people who seriously identify with the times just past, normally have difficulties in a new situation because they were considered passé. The best example of this was when disco ended from day-to-nite in 1979, for no specific reason. The morning after, nobody would be caught dead in a disco outfit! Something happened to me when New Wave gave way to hip-hop. I was too close with those skinny black jeans! Plus, when I say that I ran myself out of town, there is a certain truth to that, because I opened Mars in 1990, and that was the first legally established place to really play some kick-ass hip hop—and I absolutely hated hip hop! I was not gonna put up with it! Then, because of all the shootings and stabbings in Mars, I decided to get away from the young crowd, and became a partner with Mark Fleischman at Tatou, a very successful supper club that existed in midtown for many years. When we decided to open branches in Aspen and Beverly Hills, I thought it was time to say farewell to NY. Then you initiated some kind of a pilgrimage around the world that lasted for roughly 20 years? Yes! I’m this German that became the Wandering Jew! Well, long story short, after a few years, California became just too lame for me and, besides, I heard voices telling me that my destiny was to go back to Germany, where I hadn’t been in 25 years. So, not wanting to argue with those voices, I sold my part in Tatou, went back to Berlin, and got a nice apartment there. Three months later, I realized that I couldn’t stand all those krauts around me, and I started to remember why exactly I had left Germany in the first place! It is an impossible place to live! I threw myself out of town again, and fled to Paris. In Paris, I was the promotions director of Les Bains Douches for a while, and did many other clubs and events for 6 years. Then, projects in Belgium and London followed suit. I spent one year in Lisbon, 4 years in Miami, and now 5 in Brazil. Yes, I call it tourism in slow motion, because in every damn place that people normally visit for a couple of days, I ended up staying there for years and years. I had fun, though. Of all these clubs you participated in, which one do you consider the greatest, most incredible nightspot you ever were involved with? You know, I hate being nostalgic and like so many other club people, I live for the here and now. But, as we both are true blue connoisseurs, let me just say the following: Up until recently, I would have said Danceteria, no question.That place had an un-fucking-believable magic, and, as you were part of it, I need to explain no longer. A short while ago, however, I came across an old issue of Mao Mag that had a long article about the Palladium, and I came to realize that this was really the most fabulous club of all time. And you were involved in it too! I came to think of all the aspects that made that place so great, like that fantastic old theater, Arata Isosaki the architect, Steve and Ian, the sheer luxury and size of it, those incredible parties for 5,000 people, all dressed up. It was a castle of dreams, a never ending ball at the Grand Opera. I also realized that, nowadays, the Palladium has been overlooked and even forgotten, in spite of the fact that no other place like that existed in the whole world—ever! There was an aura there, some atmosphere that cannot be repeated, and that will never come back. But then, again, Marx said that “History does repeat itself, but the second time around, only as a farce.”

Summer Preview: How the Hamptons Spent Its Winter Vacation

The off-season on the East End was nothing so much as an elaborate game of musical chairs, where restaurants swapped locations, switched bays and changed towns, and when the music stopped, one of the only people sans chair was, of course, Jean Luc. Read on for our detailed round up of what’s moved and shook on the island over the winter, and be sure to check out all the latest openings and perks on our comprehensive Hamptons Guide for the iPhone. Enjoy!

Last year’s Southampton daytime-drinking party-starter Day & Night, following the trend, has moved further east. For the season ahead, kicking off with the Memorial Day bash this Saturday, the bros. Koch describe a circus that features everything short of a French dwarf running around screaming “De plane, boss, de plane.” But give them time, plans do, in fact, include a seaplane (“We’re working with V1 Jets to offer packaged seaplane flights from NYC directly to the venue,” Daniel Koch tells us) and jet skis shuttling guests from boats in the harbor to the party. It all sounds like great fun until you realize that the boys aren’t playing in the Pink Elephant‘s sandbox anymore, that jet skis are prohibited in Three Mile Harbor (that goes double for seaplanes), and that the East Hampton PD once carted a gallery owner who had been in the town for three decades away in a police cruiser because she served wine at an art opening without a permit. Then it gets more fun.

RdV. East (from the crew behind the Meat Packing District’s Bagatelle, Kiss & Fly, and, of course, RdV) takes on the Tavern space (which previously hosted La Playa) and promises to perk up what has become a dwindling club scene. With Pink Elephant sunk in a legal morass, RdV East joins Dune and Lily Pond as the only legitimate club options this side of the canal.

The Montauk locals and watchers of the inexorable crawl of Hamptons glam toward the ocean have been buzzing about the next nail in the coffin of The End’s homespun charm. Sean MacPherson (who with Eric Goode has ridden the Maritime Hotel, Bowery Hotel and Graydon Carter’s Waverly Inn to near obnoxious success and The Jane Ballroom to notoriety) purchased the ever-so-slightly dilapidated–err, homey–inn and restaurant The Crow’s Nest. The acquisition came too late for him to do anything other than run it as is this season, but next year he promises to open a “new and improved” version.

Of course, the inevitable alarms have already sounded, to such an extent that you nearly expect villagers to meet Macpherson with pitchforks and torches when he finally does a Surf Lodge on the complex (also known as, making it a place people might actually want to stay). MacPherson certainly has, by all accounts, a prime spot, just across Lake Montauk from the newly revitalized Montauk Yacht Club (boasting its own revamped restaurant, The Gulf Coast Kitchen). It still remains to be seen if neighbors won’t complain as vociferously as they have about the Surf Lodge, situated on Fort Pond. There’s no reason to believe they won’t.

And, if you can believe it, the Memory Motel in Montauk narrowly missed being turned into a “a cool little box hotel” by reality TV couple Bob and Cortney Novogratz of Bravo’s 9 By Design. As the couple told Hamptons.com, “we missed the deal by a week.” While the landmark escaped that fate, owner Artie Schneider told us that he did indeed make a deal for the hotel portion of the property with someone else (though he’ll retain the bar immortalized by the Rolling Stones in the song of the same name). Changes could come in as little as a month or so, he said.

New casual coastal restaurant Navy Beach opened early and well on a distant stretch of road along some of of Montauk’s prettiest bay beaches, down the sand from what had long been a naval base. The nautical theme carries throughout, from the reclaimed wood from the base in the interior, to the flags over the bar spelling “drink” in maritime code, to the seafood on the menu (though one menu item far from seafaring has been winning raves: the burger).

New this year to Bridgehamton will be Southfork Kitchen, the restaurant opening Bruce Buschel has been chronicling in the New York Times. His list of “100 Things Restaurant Staffers Should Never Do” stirred a shit-storm and garnered him a Facebook “fan” page calling for a boycott before his spot even had a name. Southfork Kitchen says it is set to serve “local and sustainable” seafood, and if you want to read how cute and fun it is to come up with names and logos and menu items and rules for servers you can read Buschel’s blog.

Ed “Jean Luc” Kleefield once joked that he would auction off the right to smash the sign from his restaurant in East Hampton. It looks like someone has finally taken him up the offer (though without the auction). The sign for Prime 103, his steakhouse on Montauk Highway now lies shattered.

And in Sag Harbor there are signs of life at the former JLX. The “Help Wanted” signs in all the windows prompted a burly passerby with dreadlocks down his back to stop and marvel. “What? So, he’s going to open it back up now?” he said incredulously. “This guy owes me $2,000 bucks, literally.” The passerby will have to get in line, but, in fact, it isn’t Jean Luc reopening the restaurant. A part of the team from the successful Trata in Watermill will make a go of it in Sag Harbor. There’s no name yet, but word is that the spot will be a French-inflected bistro, as it had been.

Now for the others who found new chairs: Mezzaluna AMG packed it in after one season, but Tim Bando of The Meeting House quickly moved in with his sleek and sexy Exile Bar. And Serafina has now taken the former Matto location in East Hampton, offering the same fare served at its midtown stalwarts. The Lodge in EH also closed, but owner Micheal Gluckman moved on up to the Springs with the Boathouse, a two-level seafooder overlooking the water. The Boathouse displaced local favorite Bostwick’s, which promptly, dressed down a bit, moved down toward Montauk Highway and opened in the former Cherrystones as Bostwick’s Chowder House. Also in East Hampton, Wei Fun said sayonara and has been replaced by The Grill on Pantigo, a sort of more casual and modern younger sibling to the 1770 House. Finally, a restaurant called Race Lane is set to open in the former Lodge spot. The owners say Race Lane will hark back to the days when the restaurant was The Laundry (which had moved to a new location a few years ago and closed this winter).

Got all that?

A Tale of Two Tuesdays

Every so often, I hear about an event that seems so cute or so silly that I cross my fingers and toes and throw caution to the wind and just go seeking wonderful once more. Tutu Tuesdays at Santos’ Party House promised mixed format music and a crowd wearing tutus. I had to see this. As a huge fan of Santos’ I figured a return to fun was surely possible. As I entered the basement a young crowd was dancing to a happy house track. Almost everyone was wearing tutus. I was delighted. It was downhill from there. Unfortunately it’s a one idea event. After the tutu smile fades you are left with a mediocre crowd and what I would describe as a forced format DJ set. It was all over the board, the mixes awful and the bass was so turned up I was sure something would blow… and I said it. Seconds later a blaring electronic sound preceded the shut down of the usually glorious sound system. When “sound” was restored, a Grace Jones track with almost no discernible vocals and again bass blaring and another clip (shut down) found me too embarrassed and annoyed to stay. My friends at the joint tell me this event is scheduled to be an every month thing. I think that may be tutu often.

I wanted to go out for a few hours but Tutu Tuesdays had only wasted 15 minutes of my time so I headed to Tuesday, Baby Tuesday to visit my old friend Alon Gibli. Alon had done this Tuesday party with me centuries ago when I was running joints. He continued to throw this weekly at Marquee and now has landed over at Kiss and Fly. The idea of Tuesdays when I was formatting A-list clubs was to make it a night a bit less formal, a bit less rigid at the door. Clubs are sort of like those infinity pools they have at swanky resorts. The water at those pools flows gently over the top and new water is fed in from below or from some water feature. Many people naturally stop going to clubs altogether. They just gently flow past the edge of the culture of clubs. When people meet people at night clubs, they often settle down, and going out just ceases to be necessary. Clubs are designed this way. They are places where people hook up, and one night stands can turn into long term relationships. It’s sort of a planned obsolescence. As these people stay home to watch SNL and make babies. New people are needed to take their place and also bring new energy to the night. At Life, Spa and I’m sure Marquee, the crowds that came on Tuesdays were often less polished than the rest of the week. The smart ones who at first only can get in on the Tuesday night often become polished and graduate to be regulars on other more exclusive evenings. Tuesday was the night for the b models and the strippers getting off work early, and became known as the sexiest night. The club savvy players learned that the looser atmosphere translated into great fun and an easy place to meet women interested in a more sophisticated experience than they were used to. This night was always packed and made lots of money.

Last night was better than that. The crowd inside was a very attractive mix of b models and b promoters and club regulars. There were pockets of greatness. The music from A-list DJ Cassidy even brought Russell Simmons to the event. Kiss and Fly, designed by David Graziano, is built for fun with tiers of banquettes and bars and a great sound system. I did a lap with my old friend Michael James and said hey to dozens of night time denizens. Three months into Tuesdays, Alon seems to have elevated this night into a winner.

Where Celebs Go Out: Matt Damon, Snooki and Vinny

1. Matt Damon, after Green Zone press day: Oh, boy! There are so many great restaurants here. I like Bob De Niro’s place, Nobu. That’s a good one. 2. Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi @ “Masks and Mayhem” Purim party @ Solo restaurant: Definitely, L.A., Voyeur, that club, I like it. ‘Cause I just like low-key stuff because, since I’ve been in the limelight, when I go to clubs, it’s just crazy. It’s hard to, actually, party and have a good time, because I usually go out with Pauly and Mike in L.A., and it’s just hard to party because everyone’s, like, ‘Oh!’ They go crazy. And we love that, but, yet again, we like to have our low times. So, Voyeur, definitely, a good place to go because there’s a lot of celebrities there, so we can actually relate with people.

3. Vinny Guadagnino : I don’t know. I’m not really a huge club person, so I do a lot of appearances. So lately, if I’m not at appearances, I’m really chillin’ home. But, definitely, nice places in Manhattan — Greenhouse, Mansion, Tenjune. I just eat at my mother’s house. I don’t really eat in restaurants. That’s all I can do. I’m sorry.

4. Skeery Jones: I’m a big fan of Tenjune and the new SL, downstairs from Abe & Arthur’s. That’s a really hot place. The party never dies at Greenhouse and Kiss & Fly. Those are my spots, right now. Restaurants, Locanda Verde. I’m a fan of the new Corsino, but I’m a fan of Del Posto. I like Morimoto; Morimoto’s fun. Stanton Social, always great with friends and a group of people. That party’s never gonna die. At Corsino, they do some wonderful flat breads–they do these, like, crostinis. They have a whole crostini menu. Any restaurant that has a menu just for crostinis has won my heart.

5. Sasha Antonova: Oh, my god! I live in the West Village and there are so many really good restaurants over there. It reminds me a little bit of Europe. If I would mention something, it would be French Roast. They have a special bread made with jam and eggs. I don’t know the exact recipe, but it’s delicious.

6. Eli Kirshtein: I’m not a really a club person. This is so alien to me. I like to chill and eat some decent foods. I’ve been hangin’ out at PDT alot, recently. I like Angel’s Share. I think David Chang’s concepts are fantastic, for just a casual place to hang out.

7. Radioman, a.k.a. Craig Schwarz, a.k.a. Craig Castaldo: Mostly, I wait around hotels or movie sets. I get people that way, get autographs. Sometimes, I might go to a bar, here and there, if someone’s around. What is that one on 18th Street? Avenue. I was there for an after after-party with Leonardo DiCaprio for Shutter Island, which, by the way, I have a small part in, playing a prisoner of war, psycho guy from the ’50s. You don’t recognize me because I have no beard. My hair’s cut short. I was the guy with the garden shears, at the very beginning. And I had the shackles on my feet and the handcuffs, and I’m lookin’ at Leo with a weird look. George Clooney’s flying me out to L.A.—a stopover in Vegas—and then from there, I’m going right to Burbank for the Oscars. I’ll be out there for several days. It’s one of those planes that stops and refuels. I go the cheapest way. And I stay at the Vagabond Inn—believe it or not, that’s the name of the place. And it’s out at Santa Monica and Vine. People should check it out. It’s really cool. They pay for the hotel, too. But I have to bring my own spending money. The hotel is near where the site is, for the Oscar’s, on Hollywood and Vine. And it’s homey. I like it because I can bring a bike inside. I don’t have any problems. And it’s only two floors, like, double level hotel, like a motel.

NYC: All the Week’s Parties, Eggnog Edition

Wednesday night, André Balazs accepted a small green KidRobot monster. There’s nothing quite like an awards ceremony to inject a little energy into nightlife, and the gracious Balazs excitedly accepting on behalf of his Standard Hotel promised energy is on the upswing. Just being in the same room as nightlifers like Six Six Sick and Harley & Cassie invigorated my addiction to the night, and I’m not the only one.

Perhaps it’s because people want their noms next year, but suddenly there is so much to do. The trees are getting trimmed and the eggnog is flowing freely with a number of places to partake in the merry-making. CV makes a splash with Diddy and Jay-Z paying it an Empire State visit and vies for a place on the Thursday-night party scene, with Amanda Leigh Dunn playing hostess to a downtown crew. Maialino gives you just one more reason to pop into the Gramercy Park Hotel. Suddenly we’re reminded how great the drinks taste at Macao and Apothéke. With wintery hideaways, new restaurant openings, and new faith in old parties, the holiday season is beginning to look a lot like New York Nightlife.

SUNDAY

Lowdown: There’s nothing like extending your weekend during the holidays. In fact, the holidays are one big weekend, starting with a nice cozy brunch, and easing into football or other day drinking opportunities. Which explains why Sundays are so very important. Hot Now:GoldBar (Nolita) – If gold is on your Christmas wishlist, indulge in the cozy gilded music hub. ● Sway (Sway) – Moroccan themed bar + holidays + booze + sketchy people = Sunday mental vacation. ● Greenhouse (Soho) – The Van Dam party isn’t by Jean Claude, but it’s still just as ass-kicking. ● White Slab Palace (Lower East Side) – Suddenly a staple! Worth a Look: ● Brooklyn Yard (Williamsburg) – Sunday Best in your Sunday’s Best! ● Charles (West Village) – Cozy charmer is quite possibly even more charming in the light of day. French toast, ricotta pancakes, eggs in the hole, and the lobster BLT balance custom cocktails that make you feel pretty darn good about drinking. Again.

MONDAY

Lowdown: Monday night means the beginning of your drinking week, the nearing end of your fantasy football league, and the drowning of sorrows and celebrating of victories. Here’s how we do it. Hot Now:Stanton Social (Lower East Side) – Yes, still a great place to have a fun bite/Monday night drinks. ● Butter (Noho) – Not only is this a truly great place to get sloshed on Mondays, I am now excited to admit it. There’s a cool, younger crowd that’s mixing in on Mondays and adding a bit of an edge to the festivities. Worth a Look:Black & White (Greenwich Village) – Restaurant becomes cramped, sexy, and very cozy during the holidays after ten. ● Warren 77(Tribeca) – Just right for football fans with a bit more flair. ● Johnny Utah’s (Midtown West) Those huge TVs! It’s like a co-ed college party for industry folks (and half of them are not watching football). ● Diesel Presents Danny Clark’s Monday Nights at The Ainsworth. It’s hosted every Monday Night by Giants Linebacker Danny Clark, and admission to the football party includes cocktails, beer, and food. All proceeds are 100% tax deductible and support the Danny Clark Foundation. Meh.Antik (Greenwich Village) – Okay, so Le Royale’s former party isn’t actually in Antik, it’s in the basement of Antik. We swung into the small, rock ‘n’ roll space it was small enough to feel really full, even on a slow night. Naturally, it heats up on the late side, after Monday Night Football has dissolved. Go to make friends.

TUESDAY

Lowdown: Gramercy has sharpened its edge, with a little help from Nur and a new resto. Hot Now:Rose Bar (Gramercy) – This really has a lot to do with Nur Khan, and now the music enthusiast is upping his game with Nur Kahn’s Rose Bar Sessions, featuring a band every Tuesday night. But they are secret shows. So shh. ● Maialino (Gramercy) – Now you can eat, stay, and party the whole way through the GPH. ● Avenue (Chelsea) – People were astounded to find this place under our Tuesday heading: “Duh, the hot nights are Monday and Wednesday, obvi.” Those people are right, but those people have never known the true Bea. And really, Avenue is good every night — right? ● 1Oak (Chelsea) – Right around the corner, the one-of-a-kind kids get the spillage of displaced hipster kids, who can’t decide between one gilded lounge or the other. Again, people agreed to disagree — and with a name like “Tight Jean Tuesday,” we know Jay-Z’s knots don’t fit. Others to try: Superdive(East Village) – Dear Santa: I would like kegs of champagne for Christmas, wheeled out to me by elves. Thanks. ● Simyone (Meatpacking District) – Might be able to add another notch on its belt; Tuesdays are hot at SL. ● Greenhouse (Soho) – Green is for garland and mistletoe! And Vodka!

WEDNESDAY

Lowdown: Hump day may prove to be a weekday favorite for the holiday season. Hot Now:Le Cubain (Lower East Side) – Great spot for pre-drinks and cheap eat with babes with bangs in boots and vintage fur coats. Maybe even make it downstairs for a Chloe revival — so cozy for the winter season. ● 1Oak (Chelsea) – This is still 1Oak’s undisputed hot night. ● Greenhouse (Soho) – This one is in the basement, kids. Well, it’s in the whole of Greenhouse, but it’s better down below. ● Avenue (Chelsea) – Again, Avenue. But this is a raging night for the kids on the Ave. ● SL (Meatpacking District) – Tonight is the night for this Aalex Julian-guarded door. Worth a Look:Southside (Nolita) – Tutti, Franco, and Brion run the DJ booth. If you think you know, you have no idea. ● Eldridge (Lower East Side) – Rock and roll, yes. ● Von (Noho) – Party in the basement is “pretty packed and a lot of fun” for the Noho set after 10pm. ● Coffee Shop (Union Square) – One of the true day clubs, chocked full of promoters networking via text message; the basement named USL will be making random appearances throughout the week.

THURSDAY

Lowdown: This is Manhattanites’ Friday night, which could explain why Butter is moving their dancey Friday party — Whipped — to Thursdays come 2010. Dancing, dinner, glitz, and even some glam, without the B&T jam. Hot Now:CV (Lower East Side) – Something has finally been done with the oversaturated spot formerly known as 105 Rivington. Hopefully Amanda Leigh will continue with the feel good vibes and attract a good, loyal crowd. ● BEast (Chinatown) – Main Man, Ryan McGinley’s night of debauchery, is still in swing. Expect a Misshape or two, Sophia Lamar, and a band of insiders. ● subMercer(Soho) – You may have forgotten about this celeb-laden underground, but she’s back. Worth a Look: Avenue, Boom Boom Room and 1Oak are still a great standby for good times, while the down belows — USL (down below Coffee Shop) and Macao’s basement opium den are also a great place to begin your holiday descent. Coming Up:Butter (Noho) – Friday-night party Whipped is so fresh, most can’t believe it’s Butter. Resident hipster DJs Matt & Maia draw out big name fashion folks like Alexander Wang and the Ronsons.

FRIDAY

Lowdown: It used to be a day of rest for jaded New Yorkers, but since we’ve stopped bleeding moola, Friday’s a great day to cut loose. Civetta bit the dust for a bit, as we look to Santos’ Party House to bring it with their OPEN party. Hot Now:Boom Boom Room (Meatpacking District) – You probably won’t make it in like the rest of the plebeians (us included), but if you could, this would be the night to go. ● The Standard Grill (Meatpacking District) – What’s that, didn’t make it in to Boom? Luckily, the Grill is jumping with everyone else who tried their luck and are now eating duck (or crow); even the most beautiful, classy folks gather here, so it’s a hotspot nonetheless. Worth a Look:Home Sweet Home (Lower East Side) – Jonathan Toubin brings the fairly popular New York Night Train to this little living room on Friday nights. ● Santos’ Party House (Chinatown) – A Tribe Called Quest’s Q-Tip. Upstairs. Funk.

SATURDAY

Lowdown: Whether you are above or below 14th Street, you should probably be planning on going out somewhere near to or below 14th Street. Hot Now:Boom Boom Room (Meatpacking District) – Again, try your luck. ● Lit Lounge (East Village) – Saturday night is grimy and fun! ● Bowery Hotel (East Village) – Simonez throws ragers here, spanning Thursday, Friday, and Saturday night. Worth a Look: Bagatelle (Meatpacking District) – Bagatelle’s scene gets an early start with their Rock and Roll Brunch.

Other Parties to Keep the Holidays Rolling: With Cafe Gitane in the Jane Hotel, the café with a devoted following in Nolita has taken root. And even better news? The Jane will be reopening the dancefloor to a bevvy of dance eccentrics and poseurs. If you are entertaining some out-of-towners on the weekends, Friday and Saturday nights at Highbar offers a nice (warm) view of the city. Fully heated and enclosed by glass windows — you don’t have to worry about the weather. Kittichai at 60 Thompson has just introduced three- and four-course prix fixe modern Thai menus for reasonably priced holiday meals. These are set menus served family style and available for 6 to 35 guests. A loophole to avoid Aunt Mildred’s meat pie!

NYC: All the Week’s Parties, Basement Edition

An unassuming tourist type at an unassuming football bar tells me this: “New York restaurants are crazy! There’s a club in every basement!” I nod my head. He means RdV, the bass-thumping club below Bagatelle. “No,” says the unassuming tourist, “We were in some East Village pizza restaurant or something!” Jesus, it can be tough keeping up with the NYC Jones. There seems to be tons of hidden gems that try to stay away from the people like me who can write about them, Twitter about them, Facebook about them, and ultimately ruin them. Some things are worth keeping a secret, but when the party is in the basement of Coffee Shop or some media lunch spot that regularly gets off on decent press, it’s easy to broadcast. Some other things will remain a mystery, until I can fully understand if it’s an actual basement party or simply a couple of bus boys getting high between shifts.

SUNDAY

Lowdown: It’s been a while since the playing field has leveled, but it seems as though there are some new sketchy Sundays in our future. Hot Now:GoldBar (Nolita) – Some say this is as good as Sundays could get. ● Sway (Sway) – Moroccan-themed rocker. Share in the angst with La Lohan on Sunday-night Morrissey fests. ● Greenhouse (Soho) – Though it may have a troubled door, Green’s Sunday night has been thriving. Worth a Look:White Slab Palace (Lower East Side) – A pretty awesome Sunday-nighter, taking the back door while we all were watching the front for their awesome Friday-night party to return. Sunday is one to stumble into; don’t expect boldfaced names like on Fridays.

MONDAY

Lowdown: The Monday party is a Manhattan mainstay, but let’s not forget about Monday Night Football; we did, and accidentally found ourselves having an awesome time at sporty spaces. Hot Now:Antik (Greenwich Village) – Okay, so Le Royale’s former party isn’t actually in Antik, it’s in the basement of Antik. We swung into the small, rock ‘n’ roll space it was small enough to feel really full, even on a slow night. Naturally, it heats up on the late side, after Monday Night Football has dissolved. Go to make friends. ● Stanton Social (Lower East Side) – Yes, still a great place to have a fun bite/Monday night drinks. ● Butter (Noho) – Monday night was packed again, though curiously the party is getting to be a bit more hipster. Worth a Look:Black & White (Greenwich Village) – Restaurant becomes cramped, sexy, sweaty hotspot after ten. ● Warren 77(Tribeca) – Just right for football fans with a bit more flair. ● Johnny Utah’s (Midtown West) Those huge TVs! It’s like a co-ed college party for industry folks (and half of them are not watching football). ● Diesel Presents Danny Clark’s Monday Nights at The Ainsworth. It’s hosted every Monday Night by Giants Linebacker Danny Clark, and admission to the football party includes cocktails, beer, and food. All proceeds are 100% tax deductible and support the Danny Clark Foundation.

TUESDAY

Lowdown: Tuesday clubs and bars vie to be the next hip or hipster watering hole, as real hipsters finally venture out to the fancy clubs they previously ignored. How ironic. Hot Now:Rose Bar (Gramercy) – This really has a lot to do with Nur Khan, and now the music enthusiast is upping his game with Nur Kahn’s Rose Bar Sessions, featuring a band every Tuesday night. Last Tuesday it was Elefant. And it was awesome. ● Avenue (Chelsea) – Backlash! People were astounded to find this place under our Tuesday heading: “Duh, the hot nights are Monday and Wednesday, obvi.” Those people are right, but those people have never known the true Bea. ● 1Oak (Chelsea) – Right around the corner, the one-of-a-kind kids get the spillage of displaced hipster kids, who can’t decide between one gilded lounge or the other. Again, people agreed to disagree — and with a name like “Tight Jean Tuesday,” we know Jay-Z’s knots don’t fit. ● Greenhouse (Soho) – And for the non-hipsters and everyone in between, go green. Others to try: Superdive(East Village) – Champagne Tuesdays at this place is kind of like that weird dream you had once about falling into a parallel world where people tapped Champagne bottles in lieu of kegs. Dreams do come true. ● Simyone (Meatpacking District) – Might be able to add another notch on its belt; Tuesdays are hot at SL.

WEDNESDAY

Lowdown: Hump day may prove to be a weekday favorite for the holiday season. RdV packed them in last night, Coffee Shop (???) and Norwood had a resurgence. Hot Now:Le Cubain (Lower East Side) – Great spot for pre-drinks and cheap eat with babes with bangs in boots and vintage fur coats. Maybe even make it downstairs for a Chloe revival. ● 1Oak (Chelsea) – This is still 1Oak’s undisputed hot night. ● Greenhouse (Soho) – This one is in the basement, kids. ● Avenue (Chelsea) – Chelsea is hot on Thursday nights, thanks to Avenue. ● Simyone (Meatpacking District) – Tonight is the night for this Aalex Julian-guarded door. Worth a Look:Eldridge (Lower East Side) – Rock and roll, yes. ● Von (Noho) – Party in the basement is “pretty packed and a lot of fun” for the Noho set after 10pm. ● Coffee Shop (Union Square) – One of the true day clubs, chocked full of promoters networking via text message, the basement was taken over by Prince Peter. The basement? I didn’t even know that they had a basement …

THURSDAY

Lowdown: This is Manhattanites’ Friday night. Dancing, dinner, glitz, and even some glam, without the B&T jam. Hot Now:BEast (Chinatown) – Ryan McGinley’s night of debauchery is still in swing. Expect a Misshape or two, Sophia Lamar, and a band of insiders. ● subMercer(Soho) – You may have forgotten about this celeb-laden underground, but she’s back. ● Above Allen (Lower East Side) – The view looks really good on Thursdays at this lounge with a view. Apparently a good place for drinks before you actually go out. Worth a Look:Baddies (West Village) – Collette and a slew of good-looking guys and gals make this space a great after-dinner dance spot. ● Hotel on Rivington (Lower East Side)- At the penthouse, Madonna’s main squeeze is DJing. Again. Go bask in his good looks. ● 1Oak (Chelsea) – DJ Tati brings a Brazilian flavor to Thursday. Events: Or should we say “the event of the century”? Diddy celebrates his 40th at The Plaza.

FRIDAY

Lowdown: It used to be a day of rest for jaded New Yorkers, but since we’ve stopped bleeding moola, Friday’s a great day to cut loose. Hot Now:Butter (Noho) – Friday night party Whipped is so fresh, most can’t believe it’s Butter. Resident hipster DJs Matt & Maia draw out big name fashion folks like Alexander Wang and the Ronsons. ● Boom Boom Room (Meatpacking District) – You probably won’t make it in like the rest of the plebeians (us included), but if you could, this would be the night to go. ● The Standard Grill (Meatpacking District) – What’s that, didn’t make it in to Boom? Luckily, the Grill is jumping with everyone else who tried their luck and are now eating duck (or crow); even the most beautiful, classy folks gather here, so it’s a hotspot nonetheless. Worth a Look:Civetta (Nolita) – Finally, a fun late-night spot to hit in this nabe? Steve Lewis says it’s true. ● Home Sweet Home (Lower East Side) – Jonathan Toubin brings the fairly popular New York Night Train to this little living room on Friday nights.

SATURDAY

Lowdown: Whether you are above or below 14th Street, you should probably be planning on going out somewhere near to or below 14th Street. Hot Now:Boom Boom Room (Meatpacking District) – Again, try your luck. ● Lit Lounge (East Village) – Saturday night is grimy and fun! ● Bowery Hotel (East Village) – Simonez throws ragers here, spanning Thursday, Friday, and Saturday night. Worth a Look: Bagatelle (Meatpacking District) – Bagatelle’s scene gets an early start with their Rock and Roll Brunch.

David Graziano & Corey Lane: The Guys Who Kiss and Bagatelle

David Graziano and Corey Lane are becoming moguls. David is a fantastic hospitality/interior designer with home runs like Pink Elephant and the Kiss & Fly/Bagatelle/RdV complex to his credit. Corey comes from an operations background but is well grounded in promotion, especially when it comes to South American house fests. I don’t know one person that doesn’t like or respect them. In an industry which sometimes creates tensions, that’s a mouthful. I caught up to them (and their new publicist Steve Kasuba) at their new restaurant, Ganesvoort 69, where the old Florent restaurant used to be. Florent was in the Meatpacking District when men were still packing meat while other men dressed as women were also packing meat. Late night, a scene of running mascara and sex workers of every persuasion had a bite after a long night. For club operators and staff, it was one of the few places always open where you could get an intelligent late-night meal. It was an after-hours club affair or someplace to fuel up before taking the party to the late afternoon at one of the great house meccas. They kept a lot of the charm and some of the fixtures as Ganesvoort 69 pays its respect to its vaunted past.

This used to be a very fabulous place called Florent, a late-night restaurant which I visited way too many times. What time is it now, Steve? Steve Kasuba: It’s 3:15.

Yeah, it was possible that I was eating here at 3pm from the night before. Steve: Ending your night.

Very possible. And there would be some S&M hookers over here, and some transsexual hookers and some other hookers. Spike Lee, lots of trendies. Florent was one of the great places in New York. In fact, when it went down, a lot of people were very upset because Florent was an institution, and you guys were taking over. As a publicist, Steve, you had to talk about what it’s like to go from this legendary space to Ganesvoort 69 without breaking eggs. Corey Lane: Interesting story about Florent himself. He was in here on the first night of friends and family. He came in with his boyfriend, and he sat and he had dinner. I went over and introduced myself, and I had a drink with him. I told him what our intentions were — to maintain this fun, neighborhood dinery type of feel. I said, “We promise that we’ll do good things with the space, but we have tough shoes to fill.” His comment back to me was, “Honey, my shoes are most of the time high heels. You wouldn’t feel comfortable in them.”

Well, he is that kind of guy. With Florent now closed, I don’t know if he still does his infamous Bastille Day party. Maybe you should do a Bastille Day party with him. Corey: We actually spoke about that. David Graziano: You should finish what Florent said. He did give the green light. He said he was happy with what the place had changed into. He kind of passed the baton on … Corey: He thought that we were a good, young group. He felt our vibrancy. He felt that the place was left in good hands. He passed the torch to us that night. It was very nice to have that moment with him.

Well, I think with any success, whether it’s a band or an institution like this, it’s being true to your school, being honest, and no fault can be found in that. Corey: Good sportsmanship.

I think that’s right. You guys are good sports. You’re the nice guys in the business, and you’re not finishing last. So this is Gansevoort 69. Tell me about he other properties you have. You have RdV, Bagatelle, Kiss & Fly. David: The new addition is Kiss & Fly Sao Paulo.

Now tell me about that. Are you going to actually go there? David: Yeah, we were just there last week. We signed a deal. It’s in motion. We’re in the process of designing it right now. We’re going to open up in March after Carnival. It’s a licensing/consulting deal. We’re going to help them get it off the ground. We’ll do co-brand and stuff with the DJs, stuff like that.

How are you going to operate? How do you control quality from 5,000 miles away? Corey: The first thing you have to do is you have to believe in the company. You have to investigate who these people are, what they’ve done before, and their track record, as well. Right now, we feel comfortable with the group that we’re dealing with. They’re responsible.

Are you dealing with Rudolf? Corey: Yeah, we are.

Rudolf Pieper is my mentor. He’s one of my best friends in the world. David: We’re actually designing with Rudolf. The group has done previous projects in the past that have been very reputable and very profitable.

I actually recommended you. Rudolf called me up and he was asking me about brands to take down there because that’s what he does. He rolled out Lotus. I suggested you guys. David: I don’t know if you’ve met any of Rudolf’s partners …

No. I know that I learned the business from him and Steve Rubell, Ian Schrager … he used to have a Cosmopolitan notebook. The next time that you see him, see if he still has it. On the cover of his notebook, he wrote, “In this industry, there are no friends that I cannot get rid of and no enemies that I cannot reconcile with.” David: We trust that the group is going to have the operational skills to help follow out our business plan. We’ll help them in the first couple months by implementing some of the procedures that we use in terms of steps and service. Corey, actually, that’s his expertise.

Is the idea that the Brazilian elite will be at one point passing through New York, and once they pass through New York, they will be familiar with you and therefore, it feeds your New York operation? David: Yes. Absolutely.

Once you do Brazil, Miami seems to be a natural pass because they do take that route. It’s easier to roll out in Brazil because you have that team in place, and Rudolf who does this for a living. So, is Miami kind of a natural next step? David: Miami has actually been on the map for us for quite some time. Miami’s a little trickier for us. I’m always a little bit hesitant with Miami because it’s so seasonal. Miami has to be exactly right. It’s got to be the exact right space, with the exact right local alliance. I’m from Miami, so I have a lot of connections down there as well, and I know the area really well. I wouldn’t make the move to Miami unless all the elements were right. Corey: We’ve come very close.

Kiss & Fly was an easy brand to take to Vegas. Then Vegas got hit hard by the economy, when Kiss & Fly was absolutely peaking. Have your other properties affected Kiss & Fly? Is Kiss & Fly still the same property to you? Bagatelle is different. Where is Kiss & Fly in your scheme of things? How do you maintain the brand? When people expand into other properties, how do you maintain interest in house and quality? Like Marquee is certainly a secondary brand to Avenue now. That’s like a dozen questions. Corey: With Kiss & Fly moving into its third year, where it’s found its groove is the weekends. They’re packed with European and South American tourists. We’ve become an international nightclub brand. The kid coming in from Germany or coming up from Argentina, or coming up in from most parts of South America and Europe — this is the brand that’s first on their list. And I think that that’s a good position to be in.

That’s always been your crowd, Corey. You’ve always been involved with South America. Corey: That is true. We’ve always had a South American crowd, and it’s certainly grown stronger with the European market. Some of our higher-end clientele has moved into RdV. The crowd has been replaced by more of the tourists, more of the transient crowd. The regular crowd that was more prevalent at Kiss & Fly, the higher-end Europeans, has moved over to RdV. They’ve made their mark in New York, and what’s replaced them at Kiss & Fly is more of the tourists.

I actually hear nothing but good things about Kiss & Fly. A number of my friends go on a regular basis. It’s a very strange niche club because it’s not shallow, it still has a great crowd, it has musical chops. It’s actually more fun than other clubs like that. Yet it stands alone. Sometimes it’s forgotten. It’s sort of like you’re not in the mix. You’ve positioned yourself to be to be a little bit off the beaten path. It’s very much like Florent. It’s always there. It’s always going to be there. It’s reliable. David: We share some of the same clientele with those places, but we don’t have a direct competition with them. We like that. I think that its helps. it keep its lifespan and keeps it lively. Steve: Black-Eyed Peas performed last night — an impromptu three songs at Kiss & Fly. Corey: They just jumped on the mike. They asked for a mike and performed three songs impromptu. Last week we had P-Diddy’s birthday party. We do have a mix of what’s happening in New York and a mixture of international crowd, as well.

I’m not a house head. I actually get a little nervous every time I hear house music. Corey: House music is a very general term. We play very, very happy European vocal-style house music.

I do go to see Junior Vasquez now almost every time he plays. David: He plays our Sunday nights.

So I’m going to end up there. Corey: He’s going be there next week actually.

I think Junior has absolutely come into his own. Corey: I’m going to come out because I haven’t heard him in a while.

The last time he played, the crowd gave him a standing ovation at the end of his set. David: Nice.

It was just the most amazing, uplifting thing. It’s great that you’re doing Junior Vasquez on a Sunday. I think that’s great. What time are you starting with that? Is it an early thing? Corey: Yeah. It’s an evening party rather than a late-night party. It starts at 8 and goes until 1 or 2.

It can go early or later if you need to? If it’s something that happens? Corey: If its something that’s happening, yeah. The crowd is definitely hitting earlier.

Let’s talk about RdV. I have not been to RDV. Why is that? You have never invited me. David: Have you physically seen it?

No, let’s walk over after this. Corey: RdV was, when we were initially trying to put together a design, supposed to the room that was the mature side of us. We had Kiss & Fly, which was our playground. And then RdV was going to be more mature — but still playful and sexy. We also wanted it to be a place where it wasn’t overly crowded and you can sit down in kind of a lounge environment. We made larger seating, larger set-ups for groups of people to gather in a very living room-type of environment. So when you’re down there, you get the feeling that this could be somebody’s wealthy playroom. The décor is set up around that. It’s elegant. It’s rich. We have lots of casual, soft light. But it also, again, has our trademark thing, which is a great sound system if you want to pump it up.

As an old-school operator, I think bottom line. If the seats are spread out and they’re really comfortable. How do you accommodate your bottom line? Do you need to get a certain amount per table? Do you have a great rent deal? As operators, how do you make money without cramming people in? David: It’s three venues in one building. RdV is really not about the bottom line … of course, you don’t want to lose money. But we don’t have to bang people over the head for table service or bottom service. In the end, it’s not about that.

Kiss & Fly is paying the bills. David: Bagatelle and Kiss & Fly are paying the rent. The success that we experienced from Bagatelle and Kiss & Fly allows us to run a more exclusive downstairs. We don’t have to apply bottle rules. We don’t have to enforce certain things. Corey: We don’t have to open the door up. David: The place is only available to a very specific demographic of people.

There’s been a big move into clubs and lounges in hotels. A hotel is blessed with the privilege or the ability not to have to really pay rent. Publicists are paid by the hotel. Insurance, security … a lot of the fixed costs of operating, the very high costs of operating are absorbed in the natural operation of the hotel. When they bring in a place like the Boom Boom Room at the Standard, it really doesn’t have to pay the bills that an Avenue or a Kiss & Fly or a stand-alone club does. There are people telling me that the days of the stand-alone club may be numbered. All the clubs at one point will move to hotels for a lot of reasons. Another reason is licensing, plus less police presence. You are a stand-alone club: You’re a restaurant, you are a club, and you are a lounge all in one operation. Are these people right? Are the clubs doomed? Is the hotel model the way it’s going to go? David: I think that we operate very similar to a hotel without the rooms in the sense that you take a hotel production, the food and beverage of the hotel. They often have a restaurant, maybe two, a club, a lounge, and then they have rooms above them. Well, we have the restaurant. We have the club. We have the lounge. We just don’t have the rooms above them.

But it’s the rooms that are making the money. Corey: Yeah, but look at Vegas. The numbers that they do off the floor — they’re astronomical. They’re making 50% of their revenue from their food and beverage. I think that you’re right … at some point I do think that incorporating yourself into a hotel gives you some protection and some benefits. David: It also helps drive business because you have people staying in the hotel. The nightclub venue and the hot restaurant also help drive business to the hotel. So there’s a synergy between them.

Are you getting offers from hotels? David:Yes. We’re looking at a couple different things. Corey: That’s a direction we would like to go, as well.

NYC: All the Week’s Parties

As the holidays near, it’s fun to roll the dice on what former hotspot will have a revival, or what invitees may finally get a glimpse of the most exclusive space by way of special event invitation. This week alone the The Bowery Hotel had a major resurgence, proving it’s a party player by hosting the annual Humane Society’s Cool vs. Cruel benefit, back-to-back with tonight’s Art Rocks! event. Same with the six-thousand-foot “local hang'” — The Ainsworth — which was ground zero for Stylecaster’s Short Films Premiere Party. Sienna and Savannah Miller hosted a dinner to celebrate their spring 2010 collection at the Royalton (not exactly the downtown scene we’d imagined for them). Party palaces also revive with extreme makeovers’ the closed 105 Rivington space — a splinter off of the Rivington Hotel — is getting a redux. It will be called CV, and it had a little show-and-tell this past Tuesday. All in all, the holiday times bring a little nightlife cheer in the form of new beginnings at old places, reminding people how awesome some of our nighttime landmarks can be.

SUNDAY

Lowdown: It’s been a while since the playing field has leveled, but it seems as though there are some new sketchy Sundays in our future. Hot Now:GoldBar (Nolita) – Some say this is as good as Sundays could get, but they got even better last weekend when they celebrated their big two-year anniversary with DJ Jesse Marco, Mark Ronson, Danny Masterson, and the like. ● Sway (Sway) – Moroccan-themed rocker. Share in the angst with La Lohan on Sunday-night Morrissey fests. ● Greenhouse (Soho) – Though it may have a troubled door, Green’s Sunday night has been thriving. Worth a Look:White Slab Palace (Lower East Side) – A pretty awesome Sunday-nighter, taking the back door while we all were watching the front for their awesome Friday-night party to return. Sunday is one to stumble into; don’t expect boldfaced names like on Fridays.

MONDAY

Lowdown: It’s true, Le Souk (East Village) is officially closed. East Villagers grievethe loss, sort of. But let’s not forget about Monday Night Football; we did, and accidentally found ourselves having an awesome time at sporty spaces. Hot Now:Antik (Greenwich Village) – Okay, so Le Royale’s former party isn’t actually in Antik, it’s in the basement of Antik. We swung into the small, rock ‘n’ roll space it was small enough to feel really full, even on a slow night. Naturally, it heats up on the late side, after Monday Night Football has dissolved. Go to make friends. ● Stanton Social (Lower East Side) – Yes, still a great place to have a fun bite/Monday night drinks. ● Butter (Noho) – Monday night was packed again, though curiously the party is getting to be a bit more hipster. Worth a Look:Black & White (Greenwich Village) Restaurant becomes cramped, sexy, sweaty hotspot after ten. ● Warren 77(Tribeca) – Just right for football fans with a bit more flair. ● Johnny Utah’s (Midtown West) Those huge TVs! It’s like a co-ed college party for industry folks (and half of them are not watching football). Events: On November 16, GuestofaGuest will be celebrating their new site design, with a Re-Design Party at 675 Bar.

TUESDAY

Lowdown: Tuesday clubs and bars vie to be the next hip or hipster watering hole, as real hipsters finally venture out to the fancy clubs they previously ignored. How ironic. Hot Now:Rose Bar (Gramercy) – This really has a lot to do with Nur Khan. This is certainly his Rose. ● Avenue (Chelsea) – Backlash! People were astounded to find this place under our Tuesday heading: “Duh, the hot nights are Monday and Wednesday, obvi.” Those people are right, but those people have never known the true Bea. ● 1Oak (Chelsea) – Right around the corner, the one-of-a-kind kids get the spillage of displaced hipster kids, who can’t decide between one gilded lounge or the other. Again, people agreed to disagree — and with a name like “Tight Jean Tuesday,” we know Jay-Z’s knots don’t fit. ● Greenhouse (Soho) – And for the non-hipsters and everyone in between, go green. Others to try: Superdive(East Village) – Champagne Tuesdays at this place is kind of like that weird dream you had once about falling into a parallel world where people tapped Champagne bottles in lieu of kegs. Dreams do come true. ● Simyone (Meatpacking) might be able to add another notch on its belt, Tuesday are haute at SL. Events: ● Stylecaster brought out Matt&Maia and Steven Rojas to DJ a massive party at The Ainsworth — which they filled to the brim with downtown fashion folks.

WEDNESDAY

Lowdown: Hump day was hot last night, with friends proudly tweeting their whereabouts at Boom Boom Room (I’m not sure I know of a tweet with more pride behind it). Hot Now:Le Cubain (Lower East Side) – Great spot for pre-drinks and cheap eat with babes with bangs in boots and vintage fur coats. Maybe even make it downstairs for a Chloe revival. ● 1Oak (Chelsea) – This is still 1Oak’s undisputed ‘hot’ night, but last night it was taken over (on the early side) for The Frisky’s Milestone Party. ● Greenhouse (Soho) – This one is in the basement, kids. ● Avenue (Chelsea) – Chelsea is hot on Thursday nights, thanks to Avenue. ● Simyone (Meatpacking District) – Tonight is the night for this Aalex Julian guarded door. Worth a Look:Eldridge (Lower East Side) – Rock and roll, yes. ● Von (Noho) Party in the basement is “pretty packed and a lot of fun” for the Noho set after 10pm. Events: Nigel Barker, Victoria Bartlett, Samantha Ronson came out to The Bowery Hotel for the Humane Society’s Cool vs. Cruel benefit. Next Wednesday, the 18th, head down to Yigal Azrouël for a completely different kind of party.The deconstructed hipster hot shop is having a serious sample sale from 9am until 7pm. Swill champagne and pick up Yigal’s Men’s Women’s and accessories for around 70% off. Pick up an outfit and maybe you’ll even pick up a cutie for a party later that night.

THURSDAY

Lowdown: This is Manhattanites’ Friday night. Dancing, dinner, glitz, and even some glam, without the B&T jam. Hot Now:BEast (Chinatown) – Ryan McGinley’s night of debauchery is still in swing. Expect a Misshape or two, Sophia Lamar, and a band of insiders. ● subMercer(Soho) – You may have forgotten about this celeb-laden underground, but she’s back. ● Above Allen (Lower East Side) – The view looks really good on Thursdays at this lounge with a view. Worth a Look:Baddies (West Village) – Collette and a slew of good-looking guys and gals make this space a great after-dinner dance spot. Events:Art Rocks! brings out Arden Wohl and John Whitledge of Trovata, ThreeAsFour, Tim Barber, DJ Cassidy, Luigi Tadini, Ally Hilfiger, Kipton Cronkite, Damon Johnson, Harley Viera Newton, Cassie Coane, DJ Jus Ske to The Bowery Hotel, yet again, to raise money and bring awareness to a serious rising epidemic such as Diabetes which is prevalent in the youth. The goal and hope of the benefit is that it will encourage the next generation of philanthropists, especially donors to the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center to raise funds to help further research for a cure. Next Thursday the 19th, head down to Yigal Azrouël for a completely different kind of party.The deconstructed hipster hot shop is having a serious sample sale from 9am until 7pm. Swill champagne and pick up Yigal’s Men’s Women’s and accessories for around 70% off. Pick up an outfit and maybe you’ll even pick up a cutie for a party later that night.

FRIDAY

Lowdown: It used to be a day of rest for jaded New Yorkers, but since we’ve stopped bleeding moola, Friday’s a great day to cut loose. Hot Now:Butter (Noho) – Friday night party Whipped is so fresh, most can’t believe it’s Butter. Resident hipster DJs Matt & Maia draw out big name fashion folks like Alexander Wang and the Ronsons. ● Boom Boom Room (Meatpacking District) – You probably won’t make it in like the rest of the plebeians (us included), but if you could, this would be the night to go. ● The Standard Grill (Meatpacking District) – What’s that, didn’t make it in to Boom? Luckily, the Grill is jumping with everyone else who tried their luck and are now eating duck (or crow). Luckily, even the most beautiful, classy folks gather here, so it’s a hotspot nonetheless. ● subMercer (Soho) – Two nights in a row, this spot is hot. Worth a Look:Civetta (Nolita) – Finally, a fun late-night spot to hit in this nabe? Steve Lewis says it’s true. ● Home Sweet Home (Lower East Side) – Jonathan Toubin brings the fairly popular New York Night Train to this little living room on Friday nights.

SATURDAY

Lowdown: Whether you are above or below 14th street, you should probably be planning on going out somewhere near to, or below 14th Street. Hot Now:Boom Boom Room (Meatpacking District) – If you were able to get a quick whiff of this space last week at The Last Magazine’s Halloween Party, you might have the balls to try your luck on a normal night. ● Lit Lounge (East Village) – Saturday night is grimy and fun! ● Bowery Hotel (East Village) – Simonez throws ragers here, spanning Thursday, Friday, and Saturday night. ●subMercer(Soho) – Three nights in a row, this spot is hot.