You Probably Hate Anne Hathaway Because of the Economy

While everyone is fawning all over Jennifer Lawrence this week (well, everyone but me), it appears that the public opinion of Anne Hathaway has slipped even lower than before, with her supposed perfection inducing riotous masses of women to rampage fashion houses that manufacture nipply couture gowns and public burnings of Les Misérables special-edition Blu-rays. Well, it’s not that bad, but I’m thinking we’re getting close to it. But maybe you’re like me and don’t understand the hatred of Anne Hathaway—she is, after all, just as annoying as any other celebrity (J-Law included). Perhaps there’s a psychological reason behind all of this?

Salon’s Daniel D’Addario takes a look at what makes Hathaway so polarizing, and learns that it might be our problem, not hers.

[I]t may, indeed, be Hathaway’s face that fuels her haters, if only subconsciously: “When times are good we prefer actresses with rounder faces,” says psychology professor Terry Pettijohn, who has conducted academic studies on actress preference. “They convey these ideas of fun and youth.” Hathaway, on the other hand, has a “mature face” made distinctive by its slender shape and bone structure: “It suggests she would be popular when times are more challenging.” As the economy improves, Hathaway—whose peak of fame, post-boyfriend, pre-Oscar-hosting, came amid the 2008 economic crash—may just be a reminder of bad times.

More likely, though, Hathaway is just the latest iteration of a long-held tradition: the star we love to loathe. And, indeed, Hollywood historian Ed Sikov says that this could be a path out for her: “There are two ways to win over the public: You can make the public love you, or you can make the public hate you. Maybe it’s better to say, ‘You can make the public love to hate you. Take Bette Davis.’” The “All About Eve” star was willing to make herself look mean or aggressive, and had a career that lasted decades.

“She wasn’t afraid to be hated, and audiences respected her for that.”

See, guys? You don’t really hate Anne Hathaway, you hate the recession! And also yourselves. I suggest we all go watch All About Eve. Why not? That movie is awesome! It might not help you with your Hathaway hatred (or me with my disdain for Jennifer Lawrence’s irreverent charm), but it’ll probably distract us for a couple of hours. 

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NYT Writer Surprised Actresses Sometimes Act Like Actual People

Man, the Oscars really brought out the worst in people last night, huh? In addition to all your amateur comedian friends trying to outsnark each other while live-tweeting the thing, some dudes who actually contributed to the making of a really good movie got played off by the “Jaws” theme music while the cast of Chicago got to go up there like five times. There was Seth MacFarlane’s entire hosting gig, which played like the open-mic comedy set of a frat boy who finds himself saying “it’s okay, some of my best friends are…” a lot. Someone who should never be allowed near a computer or smartphone again made a @HathawaysNipple novelty Twitter account because we are the worst generation and let this happen. Really a race to the bottom last night, everyone.

But Alessandra Stanley at The New York Times (On It!) had a much different take on the evening. She rather enjoyed MacFarlane as the host, or, at least, didn’t see him as the core problem. She saves quite a bit of her ire for a perhaps undeserving target, Best Actress winner Jennifer Lawrence, for doing human things that most people do literally every day. She writes:

“Ms. Lawrence tripped on her way to the stage but didn’t make any faux pas in her acceptance speech. She was less guarded on the red carpet, complaining to one interviewer that she was hungry and moaning presciently that the show is too long. With another, she let fly a profanity that ABC barely bleeped in time.

It wasn’t the first time she’s flouted awards-show etiquette: At the Golden Globes, she began her acceptance speech by dissing Meryl Streep. (Mr. MacFarlane referred to the gaffe in a joke, saying that he heard Ms. Lawrence say that win or lose, “it’s just an honor that Meryl Streep wasn’t nominated.”) It could be a rebellious streak in her, but mostly it’s a reminder of how young and unworldly some stars are, despite all the coaching, minders and Dior gowns.”

So first of all, we’re all on the same page on this and I don’t even need to go into about how there’s no way Stanley would have written those same words, or dedicate that much space and indignation to Lawrence if she were a dude, right? Right. And you’d think with the high standards of quality the NYT tries to hold itself to or whatever, she would have at least run a Google search and seen the literally dozens of nearly identical blog posts about how Lawrence’s “I beat Meryl!” line was a First Wives Club reference and not in any way an actual slight at Meryl herself. It’s not that hard, guys. 

The Oscars have kind of developed this presence where they’re really just an expensive, self-congratulatory mess, especially in the last few years, where a Best Picture win for Crash and Billy Crystal in blackface can somehow coexist amid glittery montages celebrating how great and envelope-pushing the movies are. And you know what? If Jennifer Lawrence can see through the pageantry and keep it real, then more power to her. She looked great and she won a damn Oscar and made a lot of really GIF-able side-eyes. God forbid lady actors sometimes swear or trip or are honest about wanting to eat food.  

These actions don’t make Jennifer Lawrence “unworldly,” they make her a person. And this may be getting off-message a bit, but I know as a culture we don’t like to think celebrities are real people, but they are, and losing that reminder that they’re human is what leads to dumb Rihanna domestic violence jokes and snark about the Kardashians’ body hair and comments about stars’ weight that young, impressionable tweens see and think about their own bodies with that same scrutiny. And you know what? The show was way too damn long. Jennifer Lawrence was right.

So, to recap, Stanley just chastised an actress for expressing a desire to eat on the red carpet but sort of praised a dude who made a really tasteless eating disorder joke while hosting. Great job, everyone! You’re all the worst.

Halle, Charlize, Adele: The Hot Damns of This Year’s Oscars

We made it! Awards season is officially over, and what a season it was. From vampire lips and salamanders to debate-rousing dresses, stars tried everything and anything to stand out on the red carpet. Although last night’s 85th Annual Academy Awards saw the safest sartorial statements, there were a few serious fashion moments that kept me from zoning out during the three-plus hour program. From Charlize Theron’s minimalist magic to Adele’s unparalleled perfection, see who aced it after the jump.

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Best Embodiment of Heaven: Charlize Theron
Respect. Charlize with a pixie cut wearing a Dior Haute Couture white silk bustier dress with embroidered detailing on the peplum does things to me.

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Best Metropolis Revival: Halle Berry
Because only Halle could make a Versace dress reminscent of a ridiculously cool 1927’s sci-film look ridiculously sexy.

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Best IDGAF (I Don’t Give A Fuck) Train: Jennifer Lawrence
Just like her pseudo wardrobe malfunction dress from this year’s SAG Awards, the Silver Linings Playbook star opted for a conversation-starting look that had people tripping over their words (and eventually made her trip on stage when she won for Best Actress).

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Best IDFAF Train with Feathers: Amy Adams
Amy gladly accepted J Law’s crazy train challenge and added feathers. This Oscar de la Renta number was freakin’ fierce. 

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Best ‘Beyonce, Who?’ Moment: Adele
That flowing hair. That airbrushed makeup. That Burberry dress. THAT VOICE. Seriously: Beyonce, who?

Photos via Getty

Watch the Second Installment of ‘Between Two Ferns: Oscar Buzz Edition’

Yesterday, we showed you the first installment of Zach Galifianakis’s Funny or Die faux talk show, Between Two Ferns: Oscar Buzz Edition. We got to see him call Jennifer Lawrence ugly, talk about feces with Naomi Watts, and have Christoph Waltz be a total weird babe as usual. And now the second part of his Oscar special has arrived. Featuring Jessica Chastain, Sally Field, Bradley Cooper, and a special guest in lieu of Daniel Day-Lewis, check out his awkward brand of comedy below.

Check Out the New Oscar Edition of ‘Between Two Ferns’

Zach Galifianaskis’ Between Two Ferns, his Funny or Die faux talk show has had it’s fare share of hilarious celebrity moments. And returning from some time out of the spotlight, the abrasive, bearded Galifianaskis comes back to bring some laughs to this year’s award season. Featuring Oscar nominees Jennifer Lawrence, Naomi Watts, Anne Hathaway, Chrsitph Waltz, and Amy Adams, check out enjoyably awkward first installment of two features.

Don’t Worry Guys, There’s No Beef Between Jessica Chastain and Jennifer Lawrence

You can relax, Jessica Chastain is still a perfect human. Contrary to alleged reports from "insider sources" that she and Jennifer Lawrence—one of Hollywood’s current most in-demand actresses–have some serious competitive beef with one another, it appears that is simply not the case.

But of course these rumors are alive—two beautiful, successful, talented, Oscar-nominated actresses could never co-exist and praise one another, right? We can’t all be Joaquin Phoneix and Daniel Day Lewis. No, this is just unnecessary. And only adding fuel to the fire, in Jennifer Lawrence’s recent SNL appearance, as part of a sketch she said, "In Zero Dark Thirty you caught Bin Laden. So what? In Winter’s Bone I caught a squirrel—and then I ate it. Boom. Deal with that." So yes, it must be so, Lawrence really has her claws out for both Meryl Streep and Chastain alike.

And being the wonderful and level-headed woman she is, Chastain took to her Facebook page to dispell the gossip:

I find it very sad that media makes up bogus stories about women fighting in this industry. Filming The Help was the most amazing experience and yet, that is the film Im most asked about in regards to "fighting on set". Why do we support the myth that women are competitive and cannot get along?

I think all of the actresses recognized this year have given incredible performances. But more important, they’ve all shown themselves to be filled with generosity and kindness. I’ve done two photo shoots with Jennifer Lawrence over the years and have found her to be utterly charming and a great talent. I’ve told her how beautiful her film work is.

Please don’t allow the media to perpetuate the myth that women arent supportive of each other. Everytime an actress is celebrated for her great work, I cheer. For the more brilliant their performance, the more the audience demands stories about women. With support and encouragement, we help to inspire this industry to create opportunities for women. And as we all know: a great year for women in film, is just a great year for film xxjes

Let’s move on, shall we?

‘Argo’ Wins BAFTA for Best Picture, Best Director

While you were watching the Grammys, the BAFTAs, the U.K. version of the Oscars, was aired on BBC America. And hoo boy, what a mess of an awards show. I didn’t watch it, so I can only imagine the British humour happening all over the place, but I can tell you that I’ve got a pretty stiff upper lip this morning as I look at the list of winners. Argo won Best Picture and Best Director. Ben Affleck. The best director. Of the year! Ben Affleck is a better director than Quentin Tarantino, Kathryn Bigelow, et al. None of those chumps can possibly live up to the magnificent director Ben Affleck. Also, both Jennifer Lawrence and Jessica Chastain lost out to Emmanuelle Riva for Amour. Christolph Waltz won for Django Unchained, and Daniel Day-Lewis surprised no one when he won another award for Lincoln. And, of course, little Annie Hathaway likely annoyed people in England, too, with her insincerity upon winning Best Supporting Actress.

The full list of winners below, via EW.

Best Film: Argo
Best Director: Ben Affleck, Argo
Best Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln
Best Actress: Emmanuelle Riva, Amour
Best Supporting Actor: Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained
Best Supporting Actress: Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables
Best Original Screenplay: Django Unchained
Best Adapted Screenplay: Silver Linings Playbook
Best British Film: Skyfall
Best Film Not in the English Language: Amour
Best Animated Film: Brave
Best Documentary: Searching for Sugar Man
Best Editing: William Goldenberg, Argo
Best Costume Design: Jacqueline Durran, Anna Karenina
Best Cinematography: Claudio Miranda, Life of Pi
Best Original Music: Thomas Newman, Skyfall
Best Make-Up & Hair: Lisa Wescott, Les Misérables
Best Visual Effects: Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer, Donald R. Elliott, Life of Pi
Best Production Design: Eve Stewart, Anna Lynch-Robinson, Les Misérables
Best Sound: Simon Hayes, Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson, Jonathan Allen, Lee Walpole, John Warhurst, Les Misérables
Best British Debut: Bart Layton and Dimitri Doganis, The Imposter
Orange Rising Star Award: Juno Temple
Best Animated Short: The Making of Longbird
Best Live-Action Short: Swimmer

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‘Entourage Movie’ Tumblr Eerily On Point

A couple weeks ago, we found out that Entourage, everyone’s favorite cable show about movie-industry d-bags (or that cable show about movie-industry d-bags that you liked okay for the first couple seasons and then hate-watched through the rest as even sweet, gentle Turtle got unbearable), will be getting a feature-length movie. It was really only a matter of time before someone took to Tumblr to skewer the project, but thankfully, Entourage Movie, which features snippets of the imagined screenplay for the film, is actually pretty hilarious.

Much like Gary Busey’s cameo on the show which is the one actual entertaining thing I remember happening on Entourage, the snippets of script are weird, hilarious and actually probably on point. The imagined interactions with guest stars like Lena Dunham (Vince describes her as being “so OPEN and RAW”), J.J. Abrams (holographic crown, underground lair) and Quentin Tarantino (yikes) are all pretty perfect, not to mention the scenes just involving the dudes out-broing each other, drinking Turtle’s signature brand of vodka and fighting over THE LAST SLICE OF REAL BROOKLYN PIZZA.

A particularly poignant scene happens inside Ari Gold’s brain, involving a predator drone. And the description of Jennifer Lawrence holding a bag of marijuana? Probably actually how it would play out on an episode of Entourage. (“MEGA HOT. TONS OF WEED.") Enjoy. 

Oscar Deathmatch: Pitting the Casts of ‘Reds’ and ‘Silver Linings Playbook’ Against Each Other

Silver Linings Playbook is slowly edging its way closer and closer to grabbing up some Oscars, and the feel-good film about feeling weird has an aggressive campaign, courtesy of those schemin’ Weinsteins, bent on stealing those trophies away from Daniel Day-Lewis, Jessica Chastain, Tommy Lee Jones, and Anne Hathaway. While it’s unlikely that the entire cast of Silver Linings Playbook will get to walk on stage at the end of February to collect their golden statues (although Jennifer Lawrence’s recent SAG win increases her chances), the film is notable for being the first in 31 years to get nominations in all four acting categories. The other film, of course, was Reds, Warren Beatty’s epic drama about the Russian Revolution. 

Here’s my question: can you really expect the cast of Silver Linings Playbook, a movie about feeeeelings, to go head-to-head with the heavyweights in Reds, a movie about political activism and the endurance of love amid historical revolution? No, you cannot! The cast of Reds would not only drink the cast of Silver Linings Playbook under the table, but I’m willing to bet they could easily knock them off faster than you can sing "Ho Hey." 

But let’s not stop there! Let’s take a look at what each of these eight actors have to offer, shall we?

Warren Beatty vs. Bradley Cooper

Warren Beatty is like, "Who?" Sorry, but Beatty is too busy resting because he’s super exhausted from fucking literally everything in Hollywood. Sure, he’s settled down now with Annette Bening, but his real life made both The Hangover and The Hangover Part II look like The Sandlot. What does Bradley Cooper bring the table? Sure, he can act like a obsessive-compulsive manic-depressive (let’s not forget that Jack Nicholson set the standard back in As Good As It Gets, by the way), and apparently he can tango or something. But can he do all that while writing, producing, and directing a movie—about the Russian Revolution? That clocks in at over three hours? And features documentary-style interviews with the likes of Henry Miller? Cool it, B-Coop. We’ll call you when we re-make Shampoo.

Diane Keaton vs. Jennifer Lawrence

Ohhhh, brother. Diane Keaton has more wacky charm in her pinky than the 22-year-old it-girl has in her entire body. But nevermind the off-screen abilities of these two; let’s talk about their roles in these two movies. Lawrence plays a woman who acts out after the death of her husband by screwing everything in sight, jogging next to a man who wears a plastic bag as a shirt, layering her face with eye-liner, and ballroom dancing. Keaton’s character, on the other hand, falls in love with poet and activist John Reed and alcoholic playwright Eugene O’Neill. The gal from Silver Linings learns to dance, whereas Keaton’s Louise Bryant is present when the course of history is changed forever. Way to put your stamps on the world! 

Jack Nicholson vs. Robert De Niro

This seems like the ultimate match-up, although it’s a bit unfair to put a 44-year-old Jack Nicholson against 69-year-old Robert De Niro. But it must happen, because everyone’s losing their minds over Robert De Niro crying and watching football. Meanwhile, in Reds, Nicholson was busy boning Diane Keaton and writing a Pulitzer Prize-winning play. No biggie. 

Maureen Stapleton vs. Jacki Weaver

Maureen Stapleton won an Oscar for her portrayal of radical feminist activist Emma Goldman. Jacki Weaver got an Oscar nomination for saying "crabby snacks and homemades" twice (and also because they just needed some nominees because we all know that Anne Hathaway is going to get that thing). This seems like an incredibly even match, right? I’d just like to see Maureen Stapleton’s Emma Goldman clomp around modern-day Philadelphia teaching these people what real suffering is like. Get me on the phone with David O. Russell: I’ve got a great idea for his next dramedy.

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