Bringing St. Tropez to NYC: Chanel Pop-Up Shop at Jeffrey

If you couldn’t make it to the south of France for the debut of Chanel’s Resort 2011 collection, you’re in luck. The iconic Parisian brand is bringing St. Tropez to Manhattan’s Meatpacking District with a temporary boutique at shopping hot spot Jeffrey New York. Recreating the Café Sénéquier where the brand held its cruise runway show last May, the Chanel pop-up has transformed the store into an authentic imitation of the red-roofed resort town.

With this small taste of life in the European seaside village, shoppers will be transported onto the chic Tropezien beaches that were known in the 1920s for attracting famous personalities from the fashion world including Coco Chanel herself.

Green Step

Editors worldwide are going kind of nuts over the return of boldness and color on the runways (did color ever really leave?). Either way, I decided to do a little skimming for my favorite Spring/Summer 2011 shoes, but with a myopic focus: said shoes had to contain some element of the color green. Why? ‘Cause it’s my favorite color. While none are available quite yet, at least this mini-guide will give you a sense of what to wish/save for should vert also be your tone of choice—seafoam is totally the new black. In a niche world once briefly dominated by a man whose last name starts with L and ends in –ouboutin (yet has now sadly gone the way of t acky), a couple of players stand at the ready to fill the role of trendy “it” shoe designer. My prediction? Brit Nicholas Kirkwood. Already well on his way to attaining cult/obsession/freak-out status, Kirkwood makes wild and pretty shoes for wild and pretty people. Look at this blue-green platform. Appreciate its teetering height and its aerodynamic lines. While Kirkwood may not have as obvious a signature as a bright red sole, those who know his designs can spot them from miles and miles away. Kirkwood is sold at Jeffrey New York.

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Italian provocation via Miu Miu is forever appreciated in my book, and I will respect you immensely if you can pull these heels off. In a collection rife with pop elements and all kinds of Miuccia Prada headiness, it will take a certain amount of eccentricity to wear these effectively. If you can’t muster it, these stripey heels are just awesome to gaze at. Contact Miu Miu in Soho.

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Where would American fashion design be in 2010 without Alexander Wang? Though his S/S 2011 collection was arguably not his best, the shoes are sure to be sell-outs as usual. For example, this army-drab cutout chunky boot has all the essential Wang elements that skinny androgynous city girls craze over. With an eponymous store in the works, you’ll soon be able to get your Alex fill in one stop. For now, contact Barneys or Opening Ceremony.

Moises de la Renta: Fashion Scion Gone Solo

Moises de la Renta could very well be a reality television icon by now. With Fashion God Oscar de la Renta as his father and a velvet rope lifestyle, he certainly fits the I-wish-I-was-him credentials. But Moises opted for a real (and respected) career in design/photography. And if his recently launched, painfully hip website for his bad ass womenswear fashion line MDLR is any indication, his career choice was wise. We met up to chit-chat for what I thought was drinks at the Thompson Hotel, but to my surprise, I was greeted by the man about town in a room full of models getting ready for their close-ups in an MDLR photo shoot featured on Whatswear.com. It was all lights, cameras, and action, mixed with plenty of cigarettes, blaring background noise of the sub-par performances of MJ’s classics from the previously aired BET Awards, sexy leather biker jackets complete with gilded MDLR zippers — and, in true rock star form, an Iggy Pop vs. David Bowie debate.

Let’s cut right to the chase. Why should people care about MDLR? I want to bring something a little different to the table. My aspiration is to show people almost a beautiful and glorious gloom — that it’s OK to be melancholy. I want to speak for the lady in the corner of the club, you know what I mean? She’s just chilling, doing her thing.

I’m going to need you to specify on the type of club girl though — not a Marquee girl, I hope. You’ve ever been to the Roxy in 1985? That type of girl.

What inspired you to start the line? The situation here is that, you know, it’s about having fun … creating. That’s all it is for me. What got me into this was really advertising, looking at old Jil Sander ads and stuff, and just looking through the magazines — that’s kind of what got me into photography. Inadvertently what made me get into fashion was that it was a way I could do photography. But it’s cool for me … it’s just a way I can create a world.

The newly launched MDLR website has a music section. What does music have to do with your collection? Music is definitely my inspiration — rock ‘n’ roll. The reason I came here to New York was listening to all that old time jazz — Iggy Pop and Patti Smith and all of that. It was good stuff when I thought that was how New York was gonna be … and it’s not. It’s a bunch of posers.

So is that why you chose DJ/model/musician/all things It-Girl Lissy Trullie to model for your look book? You know, Lissy Trullie to me — especially with her album, Self-Taught Learner, check that out, that’s good stuff. It’s exactly that — self-taught learner. That’s our generation. It’s just about doing your thing, going out there, not being scared, bringing something to the table. And just being you. That’s it, man.

MDLR captures the vibe from the youth of old downtown New York. Is New York an inspiration for you? New York is a young city. It’s always about the youth. This is where it all began. This is the city of liberation and freedom — creative freedom. I want to represent the independent woman — she’s cool, she’s chilling, doing her own thing, having a good time. She may go out on her own. She doesn’t need her girlfriends, she doesn’t need her guy to pay for the bill. She’s just an independent, modern woman just doing her thing.

But more geared to the pretty faces rocking vintage concert tees in the smokey basement of Lit than Sex and the City, right? Rock ‘n’ roll is a big part of my life. I just woke up and listening to Green Day’s Dookie, just a side note … But anyhow, it’s definitely for the girl who likes to have fun, for the girl who feels like a rock star even though she may not be. My clothes are just about having fun and being comfortable with oneself.

Speaking of a pre-Giuliani New York, what do you miss about it? New York used to be about coming together. It didn’t matter about how much money you had. I think there’s a little more of a commercialism. Obviously we do live in a time that is somewhat dictated by money, but at the end of the day, I think on the flip side of the recession is that it brought people together — it brought creative people together, and a lot more people are willing to collaborate. It’s more about just creating good things, man. It’s not really about the commercial appeal of making money, because there’s not really any money out there. So people just wanna have fun and have a good time, so I think that’s great.

So where do you party nowadays? I miss Beatrice … we want it to come back, but I don’t think it will. Jane’s cool … I’ve been hanging out a lot there. Chloe’s alright. Avenue is a cool little bar.

I’ve seen you prep it up and get all vintage rock star. How would you describe your personal style? Lots of black and jeans. I don’t know … comfortable American I suppose. I just like to be comfortable, so for me that means a nice pair of 511 skinny worn-in black jeans — it doesn’t really depend on my mood. Most of the time I’m wearing the same thing. I have five black jeans and who knows how many black tees.

Where do you shop? I like vintage stores. I like Tokio7, Barneys. I like What Goes Around Comes Around. And I like Jeffrey’s.

What Goes Around Comes Around and Jeffrey’s? That’s like saying you like Jessica Simpson and the Rolling Stones (which is totes cool in my book, by the way). (Laughing) No, Jeffrey’s is where I get my candles and all that Diptyque shit. Not clothing, but sometimes shoes.

Describe your perfect date. A bottle of red, St. Marks, some sushi. Maybe a film at the Angelika.

Favorite restaurant? Westville’s pretty cool. But I like to go to Cipriani’s. (laughing) Just joking. But I do like Da Silvano. I love it there … actually, I like Bar Pitti better — it’s lighter.

I’ve seen the Polaroids scattered all over your studio, and I know you enjoy shooting your interesting friends. What inspires your photography? Life and death. My favorite photographers are Annie Leibovitz, Bill Brandt and Irving Penn.

MDLR is a far cry from your father’s sophisticated feminine gowns. What does it take to be considered a rebel? I don’t really consider myself to be a rebel. But Stephen Hawking’s a rebel. Anyone who’s willing to challenge the current state of being is a rebel to me … anyone who stands up for change, stands up for others, for what’s right is a rebel.

So you’re a rebel in the making. Is there a fine line between making bold choices and trying too hard (a.k.a. a poser)? I hope one day I can change certain things about the fashion industry and maybe be a rebel myself. I don’t know, I just try and do my thing … that’s all. And hopefully, by staying true to myself, some changes will be made. And yes, there is always a fine line. If something’s not you, don’t rock it because the clothes pick the person, ya dig? So if you’re rocking an outfit that you don’t feel, you’re probably trying too hard and should throw on some jeans and a button down. Less is more anyway — simple is chic.

It’s your Fashion Week show. What music will you be playing, and who do you want front row center? I’d like Iggy Pop to be playing. They’re both great but Bowie bit a lot from Iggy when he first came to America and was trying to be all “raw” and “rock ‘n’ roll.” Iggy Pop is fucking raw power man, and Zombie Birdhouse is one of the best and most underrated albums ever, but so was Bowie’s Low. But Iggy still tops it in my book. It’d be cool and kind of a diss to be playing Iggy but have Bowie in the front row.

Industry Insiders: The Halston Board’s Favorite Places

In our continuing quest to track down the wining, dining, and merchandising habits of the well-known and well-to-do, we were alerted to an upcoming New York holiday sale from designer Halston. Details, in case you’re wondering: the sale involves up to 75% off various species of womenswear, shoes, and bags, and it runs Friday, December 12 (9 a.m. to 7 p.m.); Saturday, December 13 (10 a.m. to 6 p.m.); and Sunday, December 14 (11 a.m. to 5 p.m.). And the scene is 96 Spring Street (Broadway & Mercer), with cash and credit accepted. But beyond hawking their wares, what do the actual Halstonians enjoy doing around town? We put the question to Bonnie Takhar (Halston president and CEO), Tamara Mellon (Halston boardmember and founder of Jimmy Choo), and none other than Harvey Weinstein (also a Halston boardmember and incidentally of the Weinstein Company).

Favorite Hotel: The Mercer. It’s a block away from the Halston office. Takhar stays there when in NYC, and Takhar, Mellon, and Weinstein meet there to discuss biz.

Favorite Restaurant (Lunch): Downtown Cipriani. Once again, only a few blocks from the Halston office. Generous servings always.

Favorite Restaurant (Dinner): Blue Ribbon Brasserie. Best in seafood, an the buzzy atmosphere promotes conversation.

Favorite Bar: The Eldridge. Halston had the private aftershow party for the Spring 2009 collection here in September. Takhar and Mellon will head down to the Eldridge after late nights in the office; great music and drinks make it a great place to unwind.

Favorite Shops: Jeffrey New York (contemporary cool collections), What Goes Around Comes Around (a vintage feast), Bergdorf Goodman (uptown, upscale luxury).