Beyoncé Leads the Top 10 Most Liked Instagrams of 2017

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Photo: @beyonce on Instagram.

 

Instagram has released the official analytics for the top most-liked posts of 2017, and, to few’s surprise, Beyoncé is now the supreme most-celebrated star of social media. She’s joined by Selena Gomez, who dominates the top ten chart with heaps of Insta-love, and the famous Portuguese footballer Cristiano Ronaldo.

So, without further ado, here’s the list.

 

10. Selena Gomez blowing out birthday candles.

 

9. Selena Gomez on a bike in the sand.

A post shared by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on

 

8. Cristiano Ronaldo on a couch with his babies and family.

Family mood

A post shared by Cristiano Ronaldo (@cristiano) on

 

7. Selena Gomez holding hands with The Weeknd at the Met Gala.

A post shared by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on

 

6. Selena Gomez taking a selfie of The Weeknd hugging her from behind.

A post shared by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on

 

5. More Cristiano with babies!

So happy to be able to hold the two new loves of my life

A post shared by Cristiano Ronaldo (@cristiano) on

 

4. Another baby pic, but this time of Beyoncé wearing Palomo Spain, with her two angels Rumi and Sir.

Sir Carter and Rumi 1 month today.

A post shared by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on

 

3. Selena Gomez receiving a kidney transplant from her best friend.

I’m very aware some of my fans had noticed I was laying low for part of the summer and questioning why I wasn’t promoting my new music, which I was extremely proud of. So I found out I needed to get a kidney transplant due to my Lupus and was recovering. It was what I needed to do for my overall health. I honestly look forward to sharing with you, soon my journey through these past several months as I have always wanted to do with you. Until then I want to publicly thank my family and incredible team of doctors for everything they have done for me prior to and post-surgery. And finally, there aren’t words to describe how I can possibly thank my beautiful friend Francia Raisa. She gave me the ultimate gift and sacrifice by donating her kidney to me. I am incredibly blessed. I love you so much sis. Lupus continues to be very misunderstood but progress is being made. For more information regarding Lupus please go to the Lupus Research Alliance website: www.lupusresearch.org/ -by grace through faith

A post shared by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on

 

2. Cristiano Ronaldo on the day his daughter Alana was born.

A Alana Martina acaba de nascer! Tanto a Geo como a Alana estão muito bem! Estamos todos muito felizes!

A post shared by Cristiano Ronaldo (@cristiano) on

 

1. And, finally, our champion: Beyoncé announcing her pregnancy in a green veil.

Meet the Artist Behind the Color Matching Collages on Miu Miu’s Instagram

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If you’ve been following NYFW, chances are you’ve been refreshing your feed every two minutes. There’s one brand that offers more than runway shows and prep shots and that’s Miu Miu. Here you’ll find the fantastical color matching collages created by mixed media artist Beth Hoeckel. Produced exclusively for Miu Miu’s Instagram feed, Beth assembled an assortment of treasures to best suit pieces from their accessory collection in a reimagined way.

For example, seashells, pink frosted birthday cake, toast with jam and a strawberry daiquiri surround a new eco-shearling bag in coral. Additionally, cherries, a floppy disk, a fire extinguisher, and lifesavers come together to float around Miu Miu’s new Automne ’16 backpack for a most playful digital display.

Beth’s work extends passed fashion and moves across many editorial platforms including stories from publishing heavy weights like Conde Nast and Penguin Random House. With a new book in the works and an exhibition this fall, I was curious to learn more about her inspiration and background.

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How did you become interested in mixed media?

I started experimenting with mixed media techniques quite a bit in high school. I went to an arts magnet high school and mainly focused on painting and photography, and wanted to try combining the two. It also partly came from not being able to afford expensive art materials, and subsequently using whatever was around. I was very drawn to collage and mixed media artists like Robert Rauchenberg and Joseph Cornell. In addition to all that I’ve collected old books and photographs since back then and loved using those elements.

Where do you like to pull images from?

It all comes from vintage books and magazines, or any old printed material. My favorite era of National Geographics are from the late 1940’s and early 1950’s, I love old cook books with color photographs and random sewing and craft catalogs.

moonrise_hoeckel

What do you love about communicating with collage?

I love the familiarity of the found images in contrast with the surreal nature of the context I place them in. In that way it can be very relatable. In some ways I think it more readily allows viewers to draw from their own memories and experiences to construct a narrative than some other art forms.

Is there a particular thought you are projecting with your work?

There are several themes. Memory, nostalgia, being lost, getting lost, loss in general, bygone eras and their ideals, hope, longing, and daydreams.

herbivore_hoeckel

How did living in New York shape your work?

I moved there in 2001 right after graduating from SAIC (Chicago), I was only 21 and it was right after Sept 11 so it was a strange time. It was a struggle to say the least, I had to work a lot of jobs to pay the bills so I barely had time and definitely didn’t have space to make art. I tried to find ways to make money off of my work so I made cards and t-shirts and sold them to shops on Bedford and even sold them by myself on the streets on occasion.

Where do you find your inspiration?

In music from PJ Harvey, Bob Dylan, Patti Smith, Rimbaud, Paul Bowles- to be honest the book The Sheltering Sky has influenced many of my works over the years.

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Discover more work from Beth Hoeckel here.

Is Hole Reuniting with its Original Lineup?

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Courtney Love’s 2010 LP Nobody’s Daughter left many longtime Hole fans unsatisfied with a full band of new recruits, though a rare on-stage reunion in 2012 sparked rumors that the ’90s rebel staple could finally be joining forces on a fifth studio album. Years have since gone by and we’ve been left to patiently wait, reminiscing about the glory of iconic singles, like “Malibu,” and deep cuts, like “Retard Girl.”

Are the glory days officially behind us?

This weekend, Love shared an image to Instagram of herself posing alongside Hole drummer Patty Schemel and bassist Melissa Auf Der Maur, tagging guitarist Eric Erlandson in the caption, below. “With the girls, serving up a Hole lot of something,” she teased, leaving our mouths watering with the ambiguity of a less satisfying, “Maybe.”

Is Hole finally reuniting with its original lineup?

 

with the girls, serving up a Hole lot of something. maybe ?? #rocknroll #girlfriends #hole @pattyschemel @xmadmx

A photo posted by Courtney Love Cobain (@courtneylove) on

 

HBD Frida Kahlo! 8 Beauty Looks Inspired by the Queen of Self-Portraiture

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Frida Kahlo inspired millions — she still does — not only with her work and art, but also with her iconic look. She immortalized her own beauty via a bevy of self portraits. Who knew we’d be into the unibrow in 2015? She makes us want to pull it off — models, make up artists, and the normal gals (us) today are still striving to embrace and mimic her non-normative beauty.

From bold brows to flower crowns and middle parts, her look still inspires the fashion and Instagram world. Like her self portraits, Kahlo-beauty is pervasive. Thank you for showing us the way Frida and happy, would be 108th birthday!

Hello!

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Photo: Pat McGrath on Instagram 

Flower crowns and middle parts done right on Gigi Hadid and Karlie Kloss.

FRIDA2_BBook
Photo: Pat McGrath on Instagram

Lily Collins: eyebrow queen.

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Photo: Lisa Eldridge on Instagram 

Cara Delevingne, the eyebrow queen! They might not be in unibrow form, but they sure are bold (and lovely).

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Photo: Cara Delevigne on Instagram 

All that Dolce perfection, done by makeup artist Pat McGrath

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Photo: Pat McGrath on Instagram 

Kendall Jenner does Dolce & Gabbana via Frida.

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Photo: Pat McGrath on Instagram 

Hello brows, hello lips. Simple, easy, and nearly natural.

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Photo: Stacey Nishimoto on Instagram 

Woodland nympth flower crown style at the Versace couture show

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Photo: Karlie Kloss on Instagram

David Altmejd: Artist, Fetishist, and Avid Bird Watcher (on Instagram)

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The Flux and The Puddle David Altmejd 2014 
Plexiglas, quartz, polystyrene, expandable foam, epoxy clay, epoxy gel, resin, synthetic hair, clothing, leather shoes, thread, mirror, plaster, acrylic paint, latex paint, metal wire, glass eyes, sequin, ceramic, synthetic flowers, synthetic branches, glue, gold, feathers, steel, coconuts, aqua resin, burlap, lighting system including fluorescent lights, Sharpie ink, wood 
129 x 252 x 281 inches (327.7 x 640.1 x 713.7 cm)
ARG# AD2014-001
Photograph by Lance Brewer

An interview with the artist David Altmejd, whose retrospective show “FLUX” opens at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montreal on Saturday. Plus, David Altmejd’s Montreal City Guide, exclusively for BlackBook.

David Altmejd has been making overwhelming, room-consuming, energetically buzzing sculptures for 15 years. His first retrospective of work has three legs, the first two already settled up in Paris and Luxembourg. Next, the show heads to Montreal, where Altmejd was born and raised. The artist speaks with BlackBook about his fetishes, greatest influences (including parrots and Louise Bourgeois), who to follow on Instagram and the life of his sculptures.

If you live in Montreal or are headed there to see the retrospective, make sure to check out David Altmejd‘s recommendations below for where to eat, relax, and play in his home city — including the place to make like Magic Mike and see Montreal’s best male strippers.

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You’re in the midst of your first retrospective.

This is third retrospective — it’s been travelling through different cities. It started in France, then was shown in Luxembourg, and Montreal is the final installment of it. I just feel that the end of the series of retrospectives, which happens to be in my hometown, is really meaningful. All my family and friends from my hometown from before I even decided to become an artist are going to see what I’ve been up to for the last 15 years. In that sense, it’s extremely meaningful. The Montreal location also offers me a perspective to look at myself from a distance in a certain way. I am actually able to see myself when I started — when I decided to become a sculptor, it all started here. So it’s really interesting in that way.

I think that the museum, Musee d’Art Moderne, had shown interest and were actually looking for partners for a travelling show, and I immediately thought of Montreal and contacted the museum and they thought it was a great idea. It was purposeful [to come home].

What is the primary message you’re sending in this collection of works?

With this show, I’m trying to convey the diversity of approaching sculpture that I’ve been exploring inside my work for many years. I’m trying to show the diversity of types of practices and material and color and relationship to space. But throughout the show in every piece, what’s really important for me to really make clear is the fact that I really consider every sculpture I make to be some sort of energy generator. It’s really important for me to showcase the work in a way that people will really see that is a series of dynamic objects that feel alive — also that each sculpture feels that way and that the show as a whole feels that way. Within each object there’s sort of movement, energy and liveliness but that the whole show has the same sort of movement.

The first time I saw your work was at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver in 2007. I felt it — the energy you talk about — in the room. I walked in and was completely struck by the mixture of the natural fibers, the objects in decay, and also the modern feeling manmade materials. It felt very representative of our world. I can still recall the energy.

Thank you, that’s so great.

Do you think about the world and how we live? What strikes you or influences you when you’re working and thinking about the energy that you’re harnessing in your sculpture?

I think what I try to do is really focus. When I start to make sculpture, what I realize is really amazing about sculpture, is that it exists in real space. It exists in the same space as the viewer; it breathes the same air. It has this potential that it could exist the same way the body of a person does in the world. I’m aware of that potential and I always try to give that power to the object, to make it feel like it exists in the world, in the same world as you. I try to do everything I can to give that power to the object — the power of existing right now. It seems obvious but I think that’s what really defines my work.

fluxpuddle_altmejd_blackbook
Detail of: The Flux and The Puddle David Altmejd2014
 Plexiglas, quartz, polystyrene, expandable foam, epoxy clay, epoxy gel, resin, synthetic hair, clothing, leather shoes, thread, mirror, plaster, acrylic paint, latex paint, metal wire, glass eyes, sequin, ceramic, synthetic flowers, synthetic branches, glue, gold, feathers, steel, coconuts, aqua resin, burlap, lighting system including fluorescent lights, Sharpie ink, wood
129 x 252 x 281 inches (327.7 x 640.1 x 713.7 cm)
ARG# AD2014-001 
Photograph by James Ewing 

What does the word “flux” mean in relation to the show?

“The Flux and the Puddle” is the title of a piece and it turns out to be the biggest piece of the show. It’s the largest, most ambitious, most elaborate. When I made that piece — I made it in 2014 — my idea was to build a large plexiglass structure and just incorporate everything that I have ever done as a sculptor: use every material I’ve used, use the theme, movement, material contrast. It became a survey piece of my practice as a sculptor. It becomes a continuum inside the museum. It is the most important piece of the show. The word “flux” comes from that piece, but it’s also an idea that is always present in my work, this idea of connection, of liquid travelling, a flow of energy, a cycle. You can see it in each of my sculptures. Also I want the whole show to show acceptance, to become a sort of system of objects. I want people to be able to feel the flow, or the flux, in going through everything in the show.

Were there new pieces made for the show?

Yes, for every venue, I added pieces. It’s really important for me to try out new things and have the feeling that the show is super fresh and contains things that were just finished an hour before the opening, and to give it a sort of sense of emergence. I like that.

I’m making a piece right now for the Montreal show. The opening of the show is going to be in a couple of weeks and I’m actually making a piece here. I don’t know what it’s going to be called but it’s a large platform covered in smashed mirror and a series of evolving elements inside it. I don’t know how it’s going to evolve in the next two weeks but that’s what I’m doing.

This might be kind of off-topic, but because your sculptures have their own energy and take up space and have a world of their own inside them, what do you think of ISIS going into these historically rich sites in Syria and destroying them? I mean this metaphorically but can any of that energy be recovered?

Do you mean, how can we make up for the loss that is happening? I’m ­surprised bythe fact that I’m so touched by what’s happening. When you think about it, they’re just objects. My reaction instinctively is a reaction of disgust. I question myself for feeling that way because they are just objects. Of course they have this rich history but compared to the life of a person, it should not be considered that important. I’m just questioning my own reaction. I’m sorry I’m not really answering the question.

I’m profoundly hopeful and I don’t really look so much at the past. I really fetishize the near future. I really fetishize the present and future and mostly the present. For me, the most precious things are the things that are living right now, things that are being made now. What I focus on is the movement, the transformation. It’s not necessarily periods or objects of a certain time. I’m much more fascinated with artists are making right now and the way they’re making new things and the way culture is transforming. That’s what I’m obsessed with.

davidaltmejd_blackbook_montreal

Untitled (Dark) David Altmejd 2001 
Plaster, acrylic paint, synthetic hair, resin, glitter 8 x 14 x 8 inches
(20.3 x 35.6 x 20.3 cm)
ARG# AD2001-004
 Photograph by Jessica Eckert 

Who are some of the artists you’re looking at right now for inspiration? Who influences you?

It’s changing a lot because my way of looking at art is completely transforming because I started using Instagram. I’m completely new to all the social media. I didn’t use the Internet that much before. Now my way of looking at art is through Internet. I see so many images, so much art, every day, every hour of the day. Culture feels a little like a mush. Compared to a few years ago where it was very clear what I liked. Galleries and museums now are 95% of the time a big mash-up of things. Before, it was clear that I had a few favorite artists that I was influenced by, but not anymore.

What are your favorite Instagram accounts?

There’s a specific type of humor. I get a lot of memes; I don’t know if they count as memes. What I experience through social media is more of a sensibility than objects with clear artistic statements or propositions. Like humor or a certain type of visual sensibility.

I have to look at these accounts and then I’ll send them to you. I don’t know them by heart. Maybe I can look at my phone right now.

Okay, there is one called @davidhenrynobodyjr. Another, @contemporaryary. You’ll see, it’s a specific type of humor. I don’t know if I’m influenced by that.
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Images courtesy of @davidhenrynobodyjr and @contemporaryary 

We must be influenced by everything we see on some level and in some way. And with the onslaught of images…

Probably, probably. My work is anyway open enough that I can include a bunch of different things that don’t necessarily make sense together. I really love birds.

Birds?

Yea, so I follow a few of them — some parrot owners have Instagram accounts for their parrots. Is that interesting?

Definitely.

It’s @bibi_the_galah_parrot. Another bird I follow is @thekeetlife. Do you want more?

Screen Shot 2015-06-17 at 7.07 Screen Shot 2015-06-17 at 7.08
Images courtesy of @bibi_the_galah_parrot and @thekeetlife

Yes, give me one more non-bird.

Okay, it’s @ anti_cgi. That’s like mostly stills from horror movies.

Screen Shot 2015-06-17 at 7.10
Image courtesy of @anti_cgi 

davidaltmejd_blackbook
Detail of: Man 2 David Altmejd2014
 fiberglass, epoxy clay, wood, feathers, synthetic hair, quartz, taxidermy lovebird, taxidermy par- akeet, pants, jacket, cotton shirt, tie, leather shoes, resin, metal wire, acrylic paint, latex paint, glass eyes, plastic bag, coconuts
77 1/2 x 24 x 26 inches (196.9 x 61 x 66 cm)
 Plinth: 8 x 30 x 30 inches (20.3 x 76.2 x 76.2 cm)
ARG# AD2014-026 
Photograph by Lance Brewer 

Before the Internet got to you, who were some of your greatest influences?

When I started art school, I was really into American artists like Cindy Sherman, Paul McCarthy, Tony Oursler, filmmakers like David Lynch and David Cronenberg. At the beginning, I was trying to define an attitude for myself and I thought that I was really into their attitudes – kind of weird, humorous or dramatic, sort of an uncomfortable space between the humorous and the dramatic. I was fascinated with that. After then when I started making sculpture, I was really into Louise Bourgeois. She’s the only one who made me understand the fundamental effects.

How do you think about your own work differently now, with the Internet and Instagram playing a bigger role?

It goes back to what I was talking about how in the past few years, my experience of art has completely changed because 95% of art can be seen through images online. It’s changing and I’m not against it. It just feels like it’s much more about a sensibility or energy. You know artists like Ryan Trecartin, what I think defines his work for me the most is a new speed. It’s such a right now kind of speed.­ I find it completely fascinating and exciting.

How do you relate that to your own work which seems really involved and not speedy, that’s something that’s best experienced in person?

I’m planning to start exploring these spaces more and more. I’d love to have a YouTube channel and start experimenting. Because these platforms are spaces. While virtual, the experience people have on them is real. I’m definitely going to explore that. We’ll see what happens. I’m sure I can find a comfortable place on these spaces. I’m sort of like a fetishist. I think it’s kind of exciting to explore new things as well.

You have to let us know when you create a YouTube channel.

[Laughs] Okay. I don’t know what it’s going to be but…

See FLUX, on view at Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montreal from June 20 through September 13, 2015.

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David Altmejd’s Montreal Gity Guide

Canada’s largest church, St. Joseph Oratory, 3800 Chemin Queen Mary, Montréal, QC H3V 1H6

Chinese food from La Maison KamFung, 1111 Rue Saint-Urbain M05, Montréal, QC H2Z 1Y6

Restaurant Le Filet, 219, ave. Mont-Royal Ouest, Montreal, QC, H2X 2T2

Hand-rolled bagels from St-Viateur Bagel, 263 Rue Saint Viateur O, Montréal, QC H2V 1Y1

The best place to walk around in Montreal: Summit Park area in Westmount

Campus Bar (for male strippers), 1111 Rue Sainte-Catherine E, Montréal, QC H2L 2G2

Cafe Olimpico for Italian, 124 St-Viateur Ouest, Montreal, Quebec, QC H2T 2L1

Miley Cyrus Turns Gender Roles on Their Heads with New Instagram Campaign

Miley Cyrus
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Photo via Paper Magazine

It seems that the quest to squash the gender binary begins with a magazine cover these days. After posing with her pig (and not much else) on this month’s Paper Magazine, Miley Cyrus pulled a Caitlyn Jenner and revealed a non-conforming gender identity, coupled with a campaign to help celebrate everyone on the spectrum.

Yesterday she launched #InstaPride, a project in partnership with Instagram to encourage transgender, gender fluid and agender individuals to share their stories and give them a platform for positive exposure. So far the submissions have ranged from personal portraits to inspirational quotes to cereal art spam.

#InstaPride is an extension of Miley Cyrus’s The Happy Hippie Foundation, founded to aid homeless LGBTQ youth. This all comes on the heels of Cyrus uncovering huge revelations about her own sexuality and gender, saying she crosses all boundaries in both respects, admitting to Paper, “I don’t relate to being boy or girl, and I don’t have to have my partner relate to boy or girl.”

She’s not a boy or a girl. She’s just bein’ Miley.

 

How Last Night’s CFDA Award Wins for Pharrell, HBA, and The Row Are Changing Fashion

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Kanye West presents Pharrell Williams with the Fashion Icon Award at the 2015 CFDA Awards. Photo: Joe Schildhorn/BFAnyc.com

What does CFDA Awards win for The Row mean for fashion? How about the Eugenia Sheppard Media Award being given to Instagram founder Kevin Systrom, or Pharrell’s recognition as a Fashion Icon?

Obviously the world is changing — has changed — and we’re just further witnessing its acceptance. The Row, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen’s fashion line, initially perceived as a “celebrity” brand, has again received the highest honor in its category, winning Womenswear Designer of the Year (the first time was in 2012). A media award founded in honor of venerated fashion journalist Eugenia Sheppard was given to a photo sharing app we all use, presented by Kim Kardashian, a reality star who has been accepted by Anna Wintour and the fashion industry as a whole. Pharrell accepted his honor stating, “I’m not a style icon, I’m just inspired.” And at a time when transgender people (the incredible Caitlyn Jenner, anyone?) are in the spotlight, Shayne Oliver’s androgynous design for Hood By Air won the Swarovski Award for Menswear  — yes, trans issues and androgyny are separate, but Oliver’s win is still a testament to widening acceptance of people, design, and visions that may have previously been deemed too “different.” And fortunately, the embrace of different is what fashion is all about these days.

We’re withholding judgment and evening out the playing field. It may not always feel like it, but as a whole we’re becoming more open to the world around us, to being inspired by people we may not have noticed, admired, or turned to before. And that’s a good thing.

Click here to check out the must-see photos from the CFDA Awards, and everything you might have missed from the after party at the Top of the Standard.

Is It a Richard Prince or Not? Who Knows?

Richard Prince
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When others’ Instagram images get sold for $90,000 a pop, people get really angry.

You’ve already heard about the recent controversies surrounding the Instagram images others have shot that have now been appropriated by renowned artist Richard Prince. “But those were MY photos!” screamed the Suicide Girls. So, where does this leave us Instagrammers? As what Richard Prince’s work typically does, it divided people’s opinions and raised a few eyebrows regarding the ethics of appropriating or stealing, whichever you prefer, for the sake of art and the copyright laws regarding our social sharing. I’m not going to go into my own opinion as I had written about it back when “New Portraits” premiered at the Gagosian Gallery but, while I’m at it, I present to you some images that may or may not be indeed one of Richard Prince’s works because by this point you’ve probably familiarized yourself with some of them. Or maybe you haven’t? What is mine? What is yours? What is his? Like, what is this? What is life?

Isn’t it so much fun to appropriate?

Richard Prince

Richard PrinceRichard PrinceRichard Prince

Richard Prince Isn’t a Thief — He’s a Genius

richard prince
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People have been up in arms about artist Richard Prince screenshotting people’s posts on Instagram and selling them for upwards of $100,000 at Frieze. It sounds like a clear case of copyright infringement, right? Why should this guy be making so much money off of other people’s works? Because he’s a genius.

 

First off, this is Richard Prince’s metier; he’s been appropriating photographs, advertisements and other works since the ‘70s. It’s in a similar vein to Pop Artists purloining mass culture as subjects (Andy Warhol, Richard Hamilton) or other “rephotographers” like Barbara Kruger and Thomas Struth. Controversial, of course, but this kind of art has been around for a while. In fact there are whole books and anthologies written about appropriation and mass media from Walter Benjamin’s The Work of Art in The Age of Mechanical Reproduction to Whitechapel’s AppropriationLove it or hate it (and plenty of people hated Warhol’s soup cans) lots of scholars and artists find this type of work inspiring and valuable.    
Andy Warhol Campbell's Soup

When Warhol first displayed his paintings of Campbell’s soup cans to the public, people thought it was a joke. Now they’re proudly on display at MoMA. (Photo via paintyourlife.com)

Also, Prince is within his rights to use these images. After a litigious battle between Prince and photographer Patrick Cariou that settled in 2014, the courts ultimately decided that some of Prince’s photographs of Cariou’s work were “transformative” enough to escape copyright laws. Basically, if you change enough of the original work (which, honestly, doesn’t have to be much of it) it’s fair use. Not to mention, we’re all embedding and regramming and sharing like crazy every day.
Regardless, who is he really hurting? Was someone going to sell that photo for $100K and now they can’t? Isn’t it more likely that the press they received from this incident will help them in the long run?
Thomas Struth

Many of Struth’s photographic work like this appropriate art and recontextualize it, especially with institutional critiques. (Photo via dspace.library.uu.nl)

Prince’s “New Portraits” is a brilliant critique of our social media-obsessed culture—it’s a commentary on the cheapening and devaluing of the photographic image in the context of the never ending visual streams (often extremely intimate or sexualized) that make up our daily lives. It’s an heuristic device that illuminates our voyeuristic culture and the question of how much authorship do we really ever have once we hit publish?

 

Good artists copy. Great artists screenshot.
Photo © Richard Prince. Courtesy Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever.