Kindle Fire Allows More Annoying Multitasking With Added ‘X-Ray For TV’ Features

I don’t know about you, but it takes me roughly four to five hours to watch a two-hour movie in my apartment. It’s not because I live in some wormhole in which time is meaningless or anything; rather, I tend to sit in close proximity to my iPhone or laptop whenever watching TV, so that, at the drop of a hat, I can pause anything any go immediately to the internet to find the answers to queries like, "Who is that actress," "Is this guy actually British," and "Did this get an Oscar nomination for anything, because it shouldn’t have." Now it looks like I’d never have to do that, thanks to Amazon and IMDb.

Owners of the Kindle Fire are surely aware of the X-Ray feature when watching a movie on their device: with one tap, users can look up information on IMDb corresponding to the movie they’re watching. I haven’t used the feature myself—I have an old-fashioned Kindle, the kind that only lets you read books (boring!)—but I imagine you can look up all the goofs and the trivia and the soundtrack listings so much easier than, say, watching a movie on your BIG TV and, ugh, having to reach over and PICK UP A LAPTOP, ugh, and TYPING THINGS, ugggggh, what a nightmare. Now, all of the information you ever need is right there. And the big news today: Amazon and IMDb are expanding the X-Ray features to include TV shows

Honestly, I am conflicted about this. Can you imagine how David Lynch, who famously hates the idea of people watching movies on their phones, would feel about you clicking all over Naomi Watts’s face while watching Mulholland Drive to see if she’s done any other girl-on-girl scenes in film? Of course, I’m a big offender—there have been several instances of "NO PHONES!" being shouted before watching movies with friends in my apartment. Wouldn’t it be nice, maybe, to just sit back, relax, and watch a movie without finding other ways to cram our brains with content, content, content? 

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It’s Your Fault You Saw A Crappy Movie

If I’ve ever spoken with you about film, I may have divulged this incredible talent I have: the ability to tell if a movie will suck simply by watching the trailer. I didn’t always think my capacity for avoiding cinematic turkeys was so special, but that was before Facebook made it normal to say things like “Why didn’t anybody warn me how terrible The Hobbit is? There goes three hours of my life!”

Buddy, that’s your amygdala’s job. The part of your brain associated with emotional learning and memory modulation—the part that should have been screaming, “OF COURSE IT’S TERRIBLE, IT’S A GODDAMN COMPUTER-GENERATED PREQUEL ADAPTATION OF THE FIRST THIRD OF A CHILDREN’S BOOK.” Could you have honestly expected anything even vaguely entertaining? The mind reels.

This is just like that time I bet my friend that the Watchmen movie would be unwatchable. When he lost that bet, he went double or nothing on Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, and I think we all know how that went. (Wait a minute—now that I think of it, there totally wasn’t a kingdom in that?) Point is, you should only be shelling out $14 to see this garbage if there’s a good chance a friend will have to buy your ticket to pay off a wager. Otherwise, please confine your unjustified indignation to IMDb message boards.

IMDB’s Top 250 Films In 2.5 Minutes

It’s my 16th post of the weekend, which means my brain is mush right now. So I leave you with this mashup video from IMDB, which is actually kind of fun: it’s clips from the top 250 films on IMDB gone through in two-and-a-half minutes.

Clearly they jammed all 250 in there by using half a second of an image from some flicks — to the point where you can’t even tell which film it is from. But plenty of them are still recognizable: The Graduate, Forrest Gump, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Gone With The Wind, The Shining, Beauty And The Beast, Home Alone, Jurassic Park.

I’m assuming these are the top 250 most searched films on IMDB, not the 250 best. Because, really, Home Alone?

 

 

Contact the author of this post at Jessica.Wakeman@Gmail.com. Follow me on Twitter.

Ancient Actress Who Sued IMDB is Revealed!

Back in October, an anonymous actress filed a lawsuit against popular reference tool and movie quote database IMDB for "violating her privacy" by revealing her real age. In November the website counteracted, making an attempt to reveal the woman’s name. We find out this afternoon that the 40-year-old’s identity has been revealed. Drum roll please! 

Huong Hoang! We know who you are! According to The Hollywood Reporter, Hoang, whose Americanized stage name is Junie Hoang, has included her name in a new court filing:

Texas-based Hoang, whose IMDB page reveals she has worked fairly regularly in recent years on such small-budget movies as Gingerbread Man 3: Saturday Night Cleaver and Hoodrats 2: Hoodrat Warriors, says she was forced to sue when IMDB took her personal information gleaned from a credit card she used to sign up for the subcription service IMDB Pro and used it to reveal that she is 40. The suit claims she has been subjected to rampant discrimination in ageist Hollywood.

Poor Hoang! It’s definitely not shocking that she has used an Americanized name to avoid discrimination in Hollywood, nor is it a surprise that women of a certain age find it difficult to land meaty roles. But… Does she really have a case? If anything, she should be suing the site for including the accurate information that she was featured in Gingerbread Man 3 and Hoodrats 2 (and don’t forget that juicy part as "Triage Nurse" on the reality show I Didn’t Know I Was Pregnant). 

Natalie Portman is IMDB’s Most Popular Actor

Natalie Portman’s having quite the 2012. First, she won the Best Actress Oscar for her hysterical/weepy performance in Black Swan. Then she had a baby, or something. But the finest honor was announced today: Portman’s topped the list of IMDB’s Top Stars of 2011, as decided by user hits on an actor’s IMDB page. She unseated Johnny Depp, who’s apparently ranked #1 for six of the last seven years — he moves to #3, while Mila Kunis shoots into the #2 slot. 

Also appearing in the Top 10, in order, were Emma Stone, Chris Hemsworth, Olivia Wilde, Jennifer Lawrence, Ryan Gosling and Christian Bale, a fine list of talented/good-looking actors who appeared in some quality movies this year. (Never mention Cowboys & Aliens, never.) Quality of selection process aside, it’s a nice look at Stars People Cared About In 2011, something you don’t always get from the typical award shows. IMDB is the world’s greatest test of popularity, as decided by people who like to yell a lot on the Internet. Do you remember when, for like six months, The Dark Knight was voted up as the Best Movie Of All-Time? (Of course you don’t, because it’s dumb.) Now it’s merely number 9, but still. That’s the type of shouty hubris I want from my lists, not anything "objective" or "meaningful."

Kudos to Natalie, even if her discussion board is filled with topics like "WHY is she sexy," "She so should’ve played Bella in Twilght [sic]…," and "Is it a jew?" Good luck for a killer 2012, as well. (More babies? More Thor? More weeping? Stay tuuuuuuuuuuuuned!)

IMDb Tries to Out Woman Who Sued Them for Revealing Her Age

Last month, an anonymous actress filed a lawsuit against IMDb in a Texas court, suing the Amazon-owned company for $1 million for revealing her age. The suit claims the company sneakily used her sign-up info when she became a member of IMDb Pro, and the woman says that having her real age (which is around 40) listed on the internet is detrimental to her career. The Hollywood Reporter obtained iMDB’s motion to a federal court to get the case dismissed, and the company is demanding the woman’s identity be revealed.

The woman had filed the suit anonymously, and the only information available about her is that she’s an actress of Asian-descent who lives in Texas. Naturally, this sent people scrambling to find out who she is, but the answer may be hand-delivered by the court system. The petition for dismissal includes a request that her name be released, as “IMDb.com cannot fairly defend against the Complaint in this case with the identity of the plaintiff secreted."

In addition, iMDB says that this woman has tried to commit fraud against them before, as she allegedly sent a birth certificate with an altered age to be used by iMDB, but “certain information was redacted so iMDb declined to make changes.”

If iMDB’s motion works, this woman is going to be faced with a worst-case scenario. Not only will the world know of her identity, this lawsuit and her age will appear as the first thing people find when looking for her on the internet. Her date of birth will go from a line of text on her iMDB profile to the subject of opinion pieces and peer-reviewed law journal articles. It’s a classic example of the “Streisand Effect,” the phenomenon when someone’s attempts to get something removed from the internet garners so much traffic, that very thing becomes even more present online.

DUPLICATE: IMDb Tries to Out Woman Who Sued Them for Revealing Her Age

Last month, an anonymous actress filed a lawsuit against IMDb in a Texas court, suing the Amazon-owned company for $1 million for revealing her age. The suit claims the company sneakily used her sign-up info when she became a member of IMDb Pro, and the woman says that having her real age (which is around 40) listed on the internet is detrimental to her career. The Hollywood Reporter obtained iMDB’s motion to a federal court to get the case dismissed, and the company is demanding the woman’s identity be revealed.

The woman had filed the suit anonymously, and the only information available about her is that she’s an actress of Asian-descent who lives in Texas. Naturally, this sent people scrambling to find out who she is, but the answer may be hand-delivered by the court system. The petition for dismissal includes a request that her name be released, as “IMDb.com cannot fairly defend against the Complaint in this case with the identity of the plaintiff secreted."

In addition, iMDB says that this woman has tried to commit fraud against them before, as she allegedly sent a birth certificate with an altered age to be used by iMDB, but “certain information was redacted so iMDb declined to make changes.”

If iMDB’s motion works, this woman is going to be faced with a worst-case scenario. Not only will the world know of her identity, this lawsuit and her age will appear as the first thing people find when looking for her on the internet. Her date of birth will go from a line of text on her iMDB profile to the subject of opinion pieces and peer-reviewed law journal articles. It’s a classic example of the “Streisand Effect,” the phenomenon when someone’s attempts to get something removed from the internet garners so much traffic, that very thing becomes even more present online.