Resurrection Summons Fashion Gods With New Retail Store

Photography: Alexander Thompson

In 1996, Mark Haddawy and Katy Rodriguez founded Resurrection, a retail archive that would become one the world’s premiere international venues for collectible and historic clothing. With locations in both Los Angeles and New York, Resurrection has attracted high fashion icons including Prince, Catherine Denueve, Lou Lou De la Falaise, Azzedine Alaia, Iman, John Galliano and Chloe Sevigny—not to mention Kate Moss, who Rodriguez cites as their longest running, most loyal client.

“Kate Moss came into the store on our first day 20 years ago,” she said. “She will always hold a special place in our hearts and history.  She embodies our generation’s curious take of high and low fashion and everything in between.”

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Alexander McQueen Dogtooth Cocoon Coat (2009), Alexander McQueen Sarabande Lace Gown (2007), Alexander McQueen Runway Gown (2008)

With a new location on Great Jones, Resurrection opens its doors to celebrate a brand new, custom retail gallery and archive. In addition to their vast inventory of vintage pieces from fashion gods like Christian Lacroix, Gaultier and Moschino, Haddawy and Rodriguez are celebrating three specific archive collections in their new space.

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It begins with a selection of rare 20th century, out-of-print books showcased on custom Brian Thoreen brass shelves, moves on to Bulgari Jewelry (including the company’s famous Tubas watches) and finishes with a pupil dilating curation of Alexander McQueen pieces.

“It’s really special,” Rodriguez said. “The collection spans McQueen’s career from our perspective. We love the early pieces as much as the very famous later collections. He was such a unique force.  It’s been an important reminder of what great is.”

Later this month, Resurrection will showcase a rare collection of Maison Martin Margiela and in September, will debut a Helmut Lang show—stay tuned.


Resurrection, 45 Great Jones Street, is open Monday – Saturday from 11 AM – 7 PM.

Iman on Model Diversity

imageWhile the modeling industry is getting increasingly more diverse, it still has a long way to go. This past Fashion Week, the New York Times noted the “Obama effect” as responsible for encouraging more racially diverse runways, but the claim hasn’t quelled debate over whether or not the industry is really making steps forward, or merely introducing stunts like Vogue Italia’sall black” issue as novelty — only revert to the same, Caucasian-centric casting afterward. New York mag has posted a video of fellow Somali models Iman and Ubah Hassan (the latter is face of Ralph Lauren for Spring) discussing exactly this subject.

“It’s a brand new day,” Iman says, citing Vogue’s recent back-to-back covers featuring black women (Michelle Obama preceded by Beyonce). But, in the same breath, she touches on the disappointment a number of young models have voiced to her when they’ve gone to castings for fashion shows and been told, “We’re not using black models this season.” “It’s like, ‘We’re not doing denim this season’,” Iman quips. While the video chat is hardly revolutionary, it’s an interesting opportunity to hear two different generations of black models discussing the issue. And it’s not all serious; there’s also talk of giving up pizza for Ralph Lauren and showing Sports Illustrated what a woman with 32As can do too.

Invasion of the Supermodels

This spring marks the invasion of the supermodel. Just as “new nostalgia” is affecting fashion trends from the red carpet to clothing racks at Topshop (not to mention TV dinner trays at Target), the recession has likewise sparked a resurgence of interest in the seasoned supe. Take one look at high-fashion advertising campaigns for SS09 and the trend is clear: “Naomi Campbell and Linda Evangelista for Dsquared2, Gisele Bundchen and Kate Moss for Versace, Stephanie Seymour for Valentino, Claudia Schiffer for Yves Saint Laurent, and now, Amber Valletta in a stunning campaign for Loewe,” says Fashionologie. And fashion rags are following suit.

For its February issue, Vogue Canada has featured none other than icon Iman on its cover. Same with designer look books — think Missy Rayder making a comeback via Alexander Wang’s SS09 look book. Considering all of the aforementioned models have perhaps passed their heyday and still look flawless, the trend is infinitely inspiring. That is, objectively speaking. Realizing you’ll never have that figure and face — no matter what age you are — is another story entirely.