Lily Donaldson Goes Wild In ‘Harper’s Bazaar’

As previews of next month’s editorials slowly begin to roll out, we’re taking notes on which models and themes are hitting the pages in a major way. One of our favorites so far is Lily Donaldson in the January issue of Harper’s Bazaar, shot by Terry Richardson. Although the editorial does indeed have a wild factor, it’s a much tamer wild than what we’ve seen from the notoriously racy Richardson in the past. Highlighting the best of the 2011 spring collections, the Julia von Boehm-styled feature has Donaldson donning everything from Missoni to Lanvin, all the while playing host to unexpected guest stars like an owl, snake, baby leopard, deer, and bunnies. And being the pro that she is, Donaldson is all smiles in most of the shots, as if feeding a deer in her Burberry trench is a totally common occurrence. While there are a few sans-animal poses, overall Richardson does a great job delivering a fun and fresh editorial that helps alleviate the oh-so-serious connotations of high fashion. See some of our favorite shots after the jump.

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Garance Doré’s Holiday Wish List

One of my favorite style bloggers is French photographer and illustrator Garance Doré. She has a natural fashion flair all her own, but when paired with her equally stylish boyfriend, Scott Schuman (a.k.a. “The Sartorialist”), it is almost too much fabulousness to bear. So when Garance shared her holiday wish list with Harper’s Bazaar, I paid close attention. See what she wants for Christmas, after the jump.

1. Personalized stationery from Smythson: I am trying to write more letters.

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2. A new diary. 3. Dinner with all my family together: It’s difficult as we’re all in different places. I would love to have us all be together for just one night. 4. A year of massage/spa treatments: amazing! 5. A ring by Gaia Repossi.

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6. A vintage Kelly Bag—in red.

Model Diary: Dare I Tackle the Weight Debate? Part II: Leave Crystal Renn Alone!

Yesterday’s post, in which I expressed my relationship with the fashion industry’s extreme standards for thinness, was motivated by the buzz going around about Crystal Renn’s new photos in the December issue of Harper’s Bazaar. Renn is noticeably thinner in the photos, and everyone—from Facebook nobodies to fashion blogs to New York Magazine—seems intent on voicing their opinion about it. Renn summed it up best herself when she said, “I think that no matter what weight I am, I will be criticized.” Yes, she’s lost some weight. Concerns for her well-being aside (Renn’s booker has stated that she is very happy and healthy, and that she had lost the weight in a healthy, self-loving way): Big fucking deal. Just because she’s not a size 14 anymore does not mean she’s a sell-out or a hypocrite. Her success as a plus-size model was revolutionary and will never be forgotten. There will forever be photos of her on the Internet in her lovely largess, and her Terry Richardson spread (and all its controversy) is seared into our collective fashion consciousness.

The implied modus operandi of Renn’s career, both in terms of the fashion industry and cultural standards of beauty, has never simply been “plus-size models are beautiful too,” but rather, that women can be beautiful at any size, regardless of numbers. She has exemplified that as a size 14, 10, and now as a size 8; in full-length and portrait shots; in photos and on the runway. She might no longer be a plus-size model, but she has still achieved the RARE accomplishment of being a high-fashion supermodel without being a size 0. And that is a huge feat.

Renn, in losing weight, should therefore not be considered as “turning on” her admirers. It is them, rather, who are turning on her. In being upset with her weight loss, they counter her mission of showing the world that women—models or not—should be accepted at any size. Why must she be at the extreme of the body spectrum? The woman has already experienced so much—good and bad—at both extremes. Shouldn’t “medium” or “average”—or “full-bodied” or “zaftig” (in the juiciest sense of the word)—be the next body type we see (at least once) in the fashion world? I think so, and there’s no one better than Renn to usher it in.

Karl Lagerfeld Keeps It Street

imageLagerfeld in Phat Pharm? Cavalli dressing like Rhett Butler? That’s the September issue of Harper’s Bazaar. The mag wrangled together top designers to dress them up in fantasy outfits. “Michael Kors, Karl Lagerfeld, Donna Karan, Donatella Versace, Alessandra Facchinetti, Giorgio Armani, Alber Elbaz, Rodarte’s Laura and Kate Mulleavy and Roberto Cavalli were all asked to get into character as something other than a designer. Armani played the role of Fred Astaire, Kors took on James Stewart’s L.B. Jeffries character from Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window, Elbaz reinvented himself as a Hollywood producer with James Bond flair and Cavalli went Gone with the Wind as Rhett Butler; he was shot embracing Coca Rocha as Scarlett O’Hara.” Lagerfeld dressed up as a rapper, striking a pose with Phat Farm jeans and untied shoelaces. “Believe it or not, I love rap,” he told Bazaar. If only he’d consented to wear his tribute T-shirt.