Brad Pitt for Chanel & Other Random Celebrity-Designer Pairings

In case you missed it, Brad Pitt has been named the new face of Chanel No. 5. The Moneyball actor and man that Angelina Jolie told to put a ring on it now follows in the footsteps of the iconic French fashion house’s previous campaign vets, Nicole Kidman and Audrey Tautou. We know what you’re thinking: Why is Brad Pitt the face of a woman’s fragrance, let alone the most famous fragrance in the world? We’re confused, too. In honor of that, here’s a lighthearted round-up of a few more curious Hollywood-fronted fashion campaigns.

Lindsay Lohan for Phillip Plein

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In-between court appearances and that infamous Playboy shoot last year, Lindsay Lohan found the time fly to Italy to shoot a campaign for German designer, Phillip Plein. She does look good, though.

Eva Longoria and Tony Parker for London Fog

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Back in 2009, Eva Longoria teamed up with her husband at the time, Tony Parker, for an unexpected shoot with London Fog. Hollywood couple campaigns are always a tricky thing, and this one was no exception.

George Clooney for Omega Watches

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We get that George Clooney is a fancy man who wears fancy watches, but this photo is just hilarious. 

Vincent Gallo and G-Star RAW

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Who knew that indie king Vincent Gallo wore G-Star?

A First-Timer’s Field Guide to the Ballet

Let’s give a warm welcome to fall, which along with introducing you to your new fall wardrobe could also introduce you to the ballet, as the new season for the American Ballet Theater commences this week. If you lean more towards action movies and indie bands, getting decked out to make a pilgrimage to the uncharted wilds of the Upper West Side could feel a bit out of character. As daunting as trading in Converse All-Stars for conservative kitten heels seems, the ABT is something all New Yorkers should branch out and try. It’s recognized as one of the great dance companies in the world. A living national treasure since its founding in 1940, ABT annually tours the United States performing for more than 600,000 people, and it’s the only major cultural institution to do so. The ABT has also made more than 15 international tours to 42 countries, and this October the company returns home to Manhattan. Twenty-one-year-old Daniil Simkin, an award-winning veteran of the stage since the age of six, offers up his advice to a ABT virgin — or those with a serious aversion to men in tights.

So what do I have to dig out of my closet to wear to the ballet? Is it an excuse to get all dressed up? One wears definitely something elegant. I prefer dark colors. Depending on personality, something extravagant or flashy should work, too. A general outline would be: as long as you would wear it to a nice dinner, it should work. For everyday wear, I really like the clothes at G-Star. For something more extravagant , my go-to store is Emporio Armani.

Recommendations: Bergdorf Goodman (Midtown East) – The perfect afternoon destination for ladies who lunch. ● Blue&Cream (East Village) – This venue is the perfect place to really show off your style. Access Perk: 50% off a Lamptons Hoody. ● Intermix (Upper East Side) – Access Perk: Receive a $50 discount with any purchase of $300 or more at this one-stop shopping mecca for city fashionistas.

Where should one go to have a few drinks before the show? If the weather is nice, definitely go the Rooftop Terrace at the Empire Hotel right in front of the Lincoln Center.

Recommendations:Whiskey Park (Upper West Side) – Access Perk: 30% off your bill at this place for posh sips. ● Cleopatra’s Needle (Upper West Side) – Nothing to text home about, but if you’re up here, you might as well get in here. Cozy jazz scene that will make you seem cultured, even if it’s just your dress. ● P.J. Clarke’s at Lincoln Square (Upper West Side) – When you’re dolled up, step into the newest branch of this uptown classic. Enjoy your ballet with a side of burger.

I’m totally new to ABT; what would you recommend to newbies like me? For first-time ballet watchers, I would recommend the pirate tale of Le Corsaire. It is an easy to follow story about a pirate who falls in love with a beautiful slave girl. The production has strong pirates, gunshots, beautiful women in gorgeous costumes, and great scenery. If you prefer something less Hollywood-esque, go for our all-Balanchine evening.

What has been your favorite part? I also really like Le Corsaire because I like to perform the role of Lankendem — the bad guy who tries to kill his friend and steal the girl. I am able to have more fun on stage when I play the bad guy. I also really enjoyed dancing the lead role in George Balanchine’s Prodigal Son, which I did for the first time in May.

What are some helpful tips that can keep me from looking like a fool? Before the curtain goes up, there are three bells, normally sounded by the ushers. By the time the bell rings for the third time, you should move towards your seats. Normally the evening starts with a short overture by the orchestra before the actual dancing begins.

It seems like the evening is pretty long; what if I need a drink? Usually the evening is divided into two to three parts with an intermission of 20 minutes in between. Snacks and drinks are available during the intermissions and before the shows at various spots outside the seating areas.

How long are we talking here? Generally speaking, an evening last from two to three hours.

So, while I’m having cocktails in a nice outfit before the show, what are you doing? There is a long and complicated routine before every performance. You have to be in hair, make-up, and costume for the show. But most importantly, the dancer must be properly warmed up. If you are not, the probability of suffering from an injury is heightened. There is a half-hour call where all stagehands and dancers need to report to the stage to make sure everyone is where they need to be. That is also when the audience starts to be seated. We all warm up and feel out the stage starting at that time and prepare ourselves mentally and emotionally to take the stage for that evening.

What’s the atmosphere like backstage? Backstage I have to say it is not as glorious and imposing as the front of the house. There are costumes in costume racks everywhere, various headpieces for different costumes, props, and sometimes even animals. And there are usually so many people everywhere running around, on and off stage at any point.

After the ballet, where should I go to complete the evening? There quite a few restaurants around the area which also might offer special after-performance dinner. There is a list of them in the program which you will receive while entering the audience area. Personally I can recommend Fiorello’s next to Lincoln Center.

Recommendations:Dovetail (Upper West Side) – Stealth door, only slightly formal, totally modern. ● Compass (Upper West Side) – Access Perk: Enjoy half-price wine on Sunday evenings at this innovative downtown-style New American with an uptown zip code. ● Jean Georges (Upper West Side) – Access Perk: “Half-Glass” Wine Special means you pay half the cost of a normal glass and get a generous half-sized glass of wine.

What are some of your favorite places to eat, whether or not you are in ballet attire? Shake Shack on Columbus. As you might have noticed, I don’t go out much while we are performing at the MET. But I have to say, the best food in the very end is my mother’s. She cooks Russian specialties with a western touch, which is quite unique. There is still no place that comes even close to how she cooks.

What is the best and hardest part of being a part of the ABT? The best part of what I do is doing what I love and being even appreciated for that. The hardest part for me is getting up in the morning.

What do you hope first-timers will find out when they come to see you at the a performance? People will be hopefully love what they see so that the first performance will not be the last.

G-Star Inspires Good Hair Days

Yesterday at the G-Star Raw fashion (rock) show at Hammerstein Ballroom, Lindsay Lohan and Taylor Momsen sat directly in my line of site, but even they couldn’t tear my eyes from the cool rockabilly hair styles the girls and boys on the catwalk were sporting. The look seemed to perfectly complete G-Star’s lesson in innovative denim craftsmanship. Hair, in general is mesmerizing to me. As a wash-and-go type of person, the prospect of doing anything more complicated than conditioning treatments or volumizing foam is the equivalent to discovering an unknown planet or making sense of molecular physics: it just doesn’t seem like something I could accomplish. But seeing these models act like characters from The Ousiders in creative denim, ladylike gloves and bright suit jackets, stomping down the runway to “Rebel, Rebel,” inspired me to do a bit of research.

G-Star Girls The easiest style a girl can do is the Victory Roll, which the video shows you how to do in under three minutes. You can start off with dry hair and coat it with a bit of mouse to hold, or you can go for the wet look, which Orlando Pita favors. For Michael Kor’s fall runway, Pita went for a deep side part, coated in gel- a miracle effect that looks both sleek and solves bad hair days. “Shiny hair is very graphic and sculptural,” Pita notes. The side part makes the hair have that tough rockabilly effect because “It looks more androgynous than if it were all slicked back.” If you are advanced in hair technique, then you can copy many of G-Star’s pincurl girls. Coat damp hair in a lightweight gel, like Bumble and Bumble Gel, and twist one inch sections around your fingers, securing them to your head with bobby pins, crossing them over the twist in a ‘x’ formation.

G-Star Guys Men who looked like Johnny Cash, Frank Sinatra, and Elvis Presley made thair grand entrances from the glowing cylinders on stage at the G-Star show. Unfortunately for the guys, it’s usually the cut that makes the style; longer on the top and in the back, and shorter on the sides (thing Rhianna right now). The guys who lacked the cut were able to compromise, a curly man made his mop ultra-volumous, and pulled forward a slight Jerry-curl. Other men used pomade to slick, or ‘grease’ their hair to make it ultra shiny.