Coach Teams Up With Disney on a New Fairy Tale-Inspired Collection

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Everyone loves a fairy tale – especially the happy ending. And today, we got our very own. This morning, Coach dropped their Disney x Coach: A Dark Fairy Tale collaboration, which puts a uniquely dark spin on Sleeping Beauty and Snow White. The collection, which fuses Disney’s animation with Coach’s signature cool, is chock-full of hoodies, jackets, purses and dresses all fit for a princess – or an Evil Queen.

 

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Launching tomorrow, exclusively at Coach’s SoHo flagship, and globally next week, the Dark Fairy Tale capsule is just the latest in Disney and Coach’s ongoing partnership. Coach Creative Director Stuart Vevers first teamed up with the iconic company on a Mickey Mouse collection in 2016. Since then, the brand has also released special edition partnerships with Selena Gomez and artist Keith Haring.

 

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Photos courtesy of Coach

All the Best, Worst & Most WTF Moments from This Year’s Met Gala

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photo by John Shearer/Getty Images

 

So, last night was the Met Gala. What used to be just an event to celebrate the opening of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s newest exhibition, has become one the biggest night’s in fashion. That means lots of amazing gowns, horrible looks and tons of WTF moments. This year, we put together a list of all three.

 

First, for the night’s best moments:

 

SZA in Versace and Chris Habana head piece and jewelry

 

photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images
For her first Met Gala, SZA paired pastel Versace with BlackBook favorite Chris Habana head wear and jewelry. Literally heavenly.

 

Nicki Minaj in Oscar de la Renta and Tiffany & Co. jewelry

 

photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images
Coming off of her double feature “Chun-Li” and “Barbie Tingz” video premiere last week, we had high hopes for Nicki. Needless to say, she didn’t disappoint. In a red and black Oscar de la Renta gown, the rapper told photographers she interpreted the theme by dressing as “the devil.” If Lucifer looks like this good, consider us Satanist.

 

Rihanna in custom Maison Martin Margiela by John Galliano and Maria Tash and Cartier jewelry

 

photo by John Shearer/Getty Images
Seriously, bow down. Rihanna’s custom Margiela by John Galliano ‘fit wasn’t just a look — it was a moment. And after last night, Queen Rih has just become The Pope.

 

Kate Bosworth in Oscar de la Renta and Tacori jewelry

 

photo by Getty Images
I usually find Kate Bosworth pretty boring — and I’m not just talking about her acting. But this Oscar de la Renta look was practically perfect. The gold, white, train and veil combo makes me not want to fight with my boyfriend long enough to actually get married.

 

Cardi B in Moschino

 

photo by Frazer Harrison/FilmMagic
Sorry Bey, there’s a new queen in town and her name is Cardi B. The “Bartier Cardi” singer looked like The Virgin Mary in her Moshino gown and headpiece, baby bump and all.

 

Diane Kruger in Prabal Gurung, Tasaki jewelry and a Philip Treacy x Tasaki headpiece

 

photo by Karwai Tang/Getty Images
Diane Kruger gets our vote for best dressed for the night. Her Prabal Gurun gown may not have been totally on-theme, but the entire look was a religious experience.

 

Solange in Iris Van Herpen and Lorraine Schwartz jewelry

 

photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images
Solange’s Iris Van Herpen dress was our other favorite look of the night. The total opposite of Diane Kruger’s sweet blue dress and train, this look was like a sexy bondage Medusa moment that made me a full believer. Okay, that was the last religious pun, I promise.

 

Lily Collins in Givenchy Haute Couture

 

photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images
To be honest, I don’t really know who Lily Collins is. I think she’s a model-turned-actress. But really, aren’t they all? Either way, I don’t really care who she is, because her Givenchy Haute Couture dress and avant-garde makeup were absolutely stunning.

 

Lana Del Rey in Gucci

 

photo by Dia Dipasupil/WireImage
Jared Leto looked absolutely ridiculous in his overdone Gucci look, but Lana Del Rey pulled her’s off perfectly. Though, that’s partly because she always kind of looks like she’s in costume.

 

Priyanka Chopra in Ralph Lauren

 

photo by Getty Images
I didn’t see Priyanka Chopra on enough “Best Dressed” lists today. Her velvet Ralph Lauren look gave me serious Joan of Arc vibes — in a good way.

 

And now for the worst. It’s actually kind of sad when celebrities get it this wrong. For one thing, they’re paying stylists a ton of money to fuck them onto the “Worst Dressed List.” But also, you can tell when they’re posing on the red carpet that they think they totally nailed it. Sorry, guys. Better luck next time.

 

Mary J. Blige in Versace

 

photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images
Let me start this by saying I really do love Mary J. Blige. But the girl’s a serious fashion victim. I honestly can’t remember one time I thought she didn’t look ridiculous. I mean, Mary J. loves herself a fedora. And remember the “Family Affair” video? Just tragic. Last night, she tried to amp things up with a Versace gown, but just looked like a kind of sloppy Greek goddess.

 

The Olsen Twins in vintage Paco Rabanne

 

photo by Getty Images
It honestly baffles me how I spent so many years worshiping the Olsen Twins. I used to seriously — and I mean this in a literal way — take notes during their shows and straight-to-VHS movies, trying to outline how to dress as cool as them. Of course, Mary-Kate spawned the whole bohobo thing, which I readily adopted for a few seconds. But that was like, 2006, and now, the whole oversized thing with way too much jewelry is just kind of depressing.

 

Cara Delevingne in Dior Haute Couture and Bulgari jewelry

 

photo by REX/Shutterstock
We have to forgive Cara Delevingne for this look, because she clearly couldn’t see herself in the mirror with that headdress. The Dior Haute Couture gown looked like a giant fishnet stocking.

 

Madonna in Jean Paul Gaultier

 

photo by John Shearer/Getty Images
Oh, and about those fishnet stockings — apparently, Madonna also got the memo. The sad part is, this look actually could’ve been good if it weren’t for its entire top half. Though, she gets some points for her crown — it was epic.

Sarah Jessica Parker in Dolce & Gabbana and Jennifer Fischer jewelry

 

photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images
At least no can ever say that Sarah Jessica Parker doesn’t go for it. Out of every celebrity, she always leans fully in to the Met Gala’s theme. Unfortunately, this year, it didn’t do her any favors.

 

But of course, for all the good and bad looks this year, there were also a few WTF moments. I mean, what’s a celebrity event without a nip slip or some self-aggrandizing? I’m looking at you, Jaden.

 

Frances McDormand in Valentino

 

photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images
I actually wanted to like Frances McDormand’s Valentino look, if only for the fact that when a reporter asked her about the religious theme, she replied, “I’m a pagan.” But alas, it wasn’t enough to make up for this trainwreck. I will say, though, if I had to imagine what a pagan high fashion look would be, it wouldn’t be too far from this.

Katy Perry in Versace

 

photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images
I’m not sure if this is a real WTF moment, it’s just bad — and really big.

 

Kim Kardashian in custom Versace and Lorraine Schwartz jewelry

 

photo by John Shearer/Getty Images
This one’s a WTF for a different reason. See, I actually liked Kim Kardashian’s Versace dress, but I feel like it was kind of understated — at least, for the Kardashian-West clan. With the religious theme and everything, I figured Kimye would show up decked out in t-shirts with their faces screenprinted on them. “No, you’re brilliant Kanye,” “No you are Kim.” Ah, what a love story.

 

Grimes in who cares because she’s dating Elon Musk?

 

photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images
I know. What? Grimes showed up in a sloppy dress and those platform Marc Jacobs shoes we’ve already seen everywhere for like, two seasons. But for someone who prides herself on being weird, the weirdest thing she’s ever done was show up to the Met Gala with Elon Musk, only to reveal that they two are actually dating.

 

Last but not least: Jaden Smith in Louis Vuitton and carrying his own gold record

 

photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images
I really didn’t think Jaden Smith would go this far. Oh wait, yes I did. The singer showed up wearing Louis Vuitton and holding his own gold record. We get it, bro. You’re super smart and way too philosophical for the rest of us pesky humans. But even Kanye isn’t this blatant.

Oh well, at least we have awhile until we have to see what Jaden Smith will wear next year.

 

Fratelli Rossetti is Transforming Footwear

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When you think of shoes, the first thing that pops into your mind isn’t usually carpet. That is, unless you’ve seen Fratelli Rossetti‘s new striped loafers. The Italian footwear brand has teamed up with handmade rug creators CC-Tapis to debut a line of striped shoes that are equal parts classic and contemporary.

Founded just outside of Milan in 1953, Fratelli Rossetti has become one of the leading names in Italian footwear. With a focus on both craftmanship and comfortability, the brand creates stylish shoes for every season. CC-Tapis, a Milan-based brand, produces eco-friendly rugs that are handmade in Tibet and Nepal.

 

 

For their collaboration, Frattelli Rossetti and CC-Tapis created two pairs of multicolored shoes that exemplify both brands’ focus on fashion, function and sustainability. Using white, mauve, pink and black to create a signature striped effect on the soles, the “Stripes Under Your Feet” capsule is a bold, yet understated statement. And in line with both brands’ disdain for mass production, the shoes are limited edition.

So, be the best dressed of your friends and buy them while you can. We have already.

 

Photos courtesy of Fratelli Rossetti

 

10 Unforgettable Met Gala Moments Throughout the Years

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Cher at the 1974 Met Gala in custom Bob Mackie; photo courtesy Ron Galella/WireImage

 

Today is the Met Gala — but you already knew that. With this year’s theme as “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination,” we’re anticipating a lot of vintage McQueen, probably some Gaultier, and of course, a hell of a lot of Dolce & Gabbana.

So, to prepare, we’ve put together a list of of the 10 most memorable past Met Gala moments.

 

Rihanna in Guo Pei

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

You can’t have a Met Gala roundup without mentioning Rihanna’s infamous dress from 2015. That year, the theme was “China: Through the Looking Glass,” and Rih chose Chinese designer Guo Pei for her look. The handmade gown took over 2 years for the designer to make and instantly made her go viral. In fact, there’s currently a new documentary that highlights Pei’s impressive career.

 

Rihanna, again, in Comme des Garçons

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images
Queen Rih also made the list because of her Comme des Garçons F/W ’16 look for the Met Gala last year. The theme actually was Comme des Garçons and Rih was one of the only people who actually wore something by Kawakubo — partly, I think, because she’s one of the only people who could really pull it off.

 

Cher in Bob Mackie

 

photo courtesy of WireImage

 

Cher always looks iconic. But it was this custom Bob Mackie gown at the third annnual Met Ball, that set the tone for it to be one of the most fashionable nights of the year. The theme was “Romantic and Glamorous Hollywood Design,” so the singer essentially could’ve shown up naked and — oh wait, she basically did.

 

Katy Perry in Maison Martin Margiela

 

photo courtesy of Margiela
Who could forget Katy Perry’s look from last year’s Met Gala? I know she can’t, because she still talks about how hard it was for her to pee. But beauty is pain, ladies and gentlemen — especially in custom Maison Martin Margiela (that looked suspiciously like Givenchy F/W ’17).

 

Sarah Jessica Parker in Alexander McQueen

 

photo courtesy of Vogue

 

“Anglomania” was the theme in 2006, and Sarah Jessica Parker went full on with the plaid, natch. On the arm of Alexander McQueen, the duo wore custom “Anarchy in the U.K.”-inspired looks by the designer, himself.

 

Lil Kim in god knows what

 

photo courtesy of WireImage

 

No one ever really knows what Lil Kim is wearing, and the 1999 Met Gala was no exception. The Hard Core rapper opted for a pink fur trench, pink snakeskin boots and a pink bikini — and no, the theme was not “pink.”

 

Kate Moss in custom Marc Jacobs and a Stephen Jones turban

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

In 2009, Kate Moss looked the total part for the Met Gala’s “Model As Muse” in a custom Marc Jacobs gold lamé mini, YSL pumps and Stephen Jones turban.

 

Liv Tyler & Stella McCartney in matching halter tops

 

photo courtesy of Mari Sarai/Getty Images

 

Sure, the Met Gala wasn’t as big of a deal fashion-wise in 1999 as it now. But halter tops? Liv Tyler and Stella McCartney, you both know better. Still, the duo really leaned in to the “Rock Style” theme with matching “Rock Royalty” tank tops.

 

Donatella Versace in Versace

 

photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

Donatella’s leather Versace look for the 1996 Met Gala was iconic for a couple of reasons: Sadly, this would be Gianni’s last Gala before his death, but also the debut of his bondage-inspired style that would become a trademark for the legendary brand.

 

Jaden Smith and his ponytail in Louis Vuitton

 

photo courtesy of Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

 

Last but not least, Jaden Smith at last year’s Gala. Yes, the theme was Comme des Garçons, and sure, Rei Kawakubo is known for getting a little avant-garde sometimes. But Jaden Smith took things to a whole different level when he showed up on the red carpet in head-to-toe Louis Vuitton, carrying his recently cut dread locks.

 

Fingers crossed he — and everyone else — leaves the gross accessories at home tonight. Though, the theme is Catholicism, so I’m guessing this year’s top trapping will be guilt.

 

Virgil Abloh Livestreams His New IKEA Collab

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IKEA is cool now – as we told you this last month, when we had three NYC creatives repurpose their iconic Frakta bag in our April issue of alexa BlackBook. But now they’re really taking things to the next level, collaborating on an entire capsule with Off-White (and new Louis Vuitton menswear) designer Virgil Abloh.

For those of you who have been living under a rock for the last year (or have spotty WiFi), Abloh already teamed up with the Swedish mega-retailer on a super meta shopping bag last summer. Since then, there have been a ton of rumors about what fashion’s latest enfant terrible could be up to. He’s dropped some hints on Instagram, leading hype machines and fast fashion connoisseurs to the conclusion that IKEA would get the full Off-White treatment sooner than later. And for once, the Insta-sleuths were right: last night, Abloh previewed his all new IKEA x VIRGIL collection via livestream.

 

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The collection includes: a wooden chair in Abloh (and IKEA’s) minimalist style; a glass chest of drawers, perfect for showcasing your new Off-White Nike Air Prestos; a triangular doorstep (yeah, we know); and handshaven ironic “BLUE” and “KEEP OFF” rugs. Abloh also shared a new version of his “SCULPTURE” Frakta.

Called “MARKERAD,” the product line is apparently curated specifically for millennials – as if that weren’t incredibly obvious – as was the livestreamed preview. Via YouTube, the designer walked his audience through each prototype, answering questions about his inspirations and intentions for each design. Abloh also encouraged his audience to leave comments and questions in the live chat and on Instagram (using the hashtag #IKEAxVIRGIL) so he can continue tweaking the designs before they drop in June.

The collab is coming at a perfect time – and for both parties. Abloh’s stock has only continued to rise, especially with the 38-year-old’s new Louis Vuitton appointment. As for IKEA, the brand has seemingly transformed into a fashion powerhouse, teaming up with designers like Walter Van Beirendonck and celebrity stylist B. Akerlund, as well as a much hyped over Vetements collaboration that never actually came out. Consequently, influencers and streetwear fanatics ended up putting their own spin on the IKEA trend, creating everything from Frakta thongs to IKEA bongs and Yeezy’s. What a world. Just remember kids, BlackBook did it first.

Watch the full IKEA x VIRGIL livestream below and revisit our Frakta Fever article here.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Eddie Lee/Hypebae

 

Watch the Trailer for the New McQueen Documentary Premiering at TriBeCa This Weekend

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When it comes to fashion, there’s only ever been one Alexander McQueen. His edgy, avant-garde looks and radical runway presentations throughout the ’90s and early-to-mid-’00s constantly pushed boundaries and reinvented shapes, catapulting the volatile young designer to infamy and accolades.

When he took his own life in 2010 at just 40-years-old, the fashion world was devastated by the loss of such an inimitable genius. And McQueen, the new documentary by Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui, will at last give genuine insight into his life and creative process.

 

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Born in London, the designer graduated from Central Saint Martins before taking over the position of head designer at Givenchy and launching his eponymous brand. By the time he was in his thirties, he had won the “British Designer of the Year” award four different times. Beyond his innovative design approach, McQueen completely redefined fashion – and the fashion show – as we’d come to understand it. Whether he was recreating a shipwreck (S/S ’03), using models in a game of human chess (S/S ’05), or programming robots to spray-paint supermodel Shalom Harlow at the end of the runway (S/S ’99), he never saw fashion as just a way to make pretty clothes (though his designs were definitely so). For Alexander McQueen, everything was art.

In the film, Bonhôte and Ettedgui capture this through archival footage, never-before-seen photographs and interviews with the designer’s closest friends and family. Premiering this weekend at TriBeCa Film Festival, McQueen paints a powerful portrait of one of his generation’s most influential artists.

Watch the trailer, below.

 

 

Photos courtesy of ‘McQueen;’ Buy tickets here.

 

alexa BlackBook: Designs on Acting: ‘Hard Sun’ Star Agyness Deyn Talks Drama with Writer-Director Alex Ross Perry

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IF you found the bleak dystopia of The Handmaid’s Tale terrifying, you’d better buckle up for Hard Sun. The sensational Hulu/BBC drama concerns a pair of British detectives who discover that the apocalypse is coming in five years — and that the government wants them dead for finding out.

Aside from providing cryptic conspiratorial thrills, the show boasts a riveting performance from lead Agyness Deyn as the intense Elaine Renko. The emotionally wounded deputy inspector is trying to save the world, resolve family trauma, and process a growing suspicion that her partner (Jim Sturgess) is corrupt.

A former model raised in Manchester, England, Deyn, 35, has proved to be a formidable actress with an excellent taste in film and television projects. The New Yorker named her one of the best actresses of 2016 for Sunset Song, the story of a young woman persevering through a brutal rural existence in World War I-era Scotland. It’s a long way from shooting ads for Dior, Burberry, Uniqlo and Vivienne Westwood and hanging out with creative collective the Misshapes (she’s been based in NYC since the early ’00s). Next, Deyn will co-star alongside “Handmaid’s Tale” actress Elisabeth Moss in “Her Smell,” an indie film about feuding female punk rockers by writer-director Alex Ross Perry.

Perry has made a name for himself as a sensitive and curious teller of women’s stories, via a quick succession of acclaimed, fantastically cast micro-indies: 2014’s nervous-novelist tale “Listen Up Philip” (with Moss and Jason Schwartzman), 2015’s deep dive into female friendship, “Queen of Earth” (Moss again), and 2017’s “Golden Exits” (with Chloë Sevigny, Schwartzman and former Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz).

Deyn and Perry convened a meeting of their mutual admiration society on an April Saturday in New York.

 

Khaite sweater, $1,150 at Saks Fifth Avenue, 611 Fifth Ave.; Pants, $690 at BodeNewYork.com; Earrings, $496 at SimonMillerUSA.com

Alex Ross Perry: Do you remember how we met?

Agyness Deyn: We met at — what’s that place called on St. Marks? It was Cafe Orlin! Wow, this might have been, like, four years ago. We ended up sitting down for about two hours chatting — drinking loads of tea. I thought it was just so fun. I remember when you spilled the tea — about the project you were working on, about stuff we were both working on, about life. The two hours went by and we were like, “S – – t, we’ve been sitting here for a long time.”

ARP: I remember feeling exceptionally encouraged and excited by it. The meeting was for a big movie that I was trying to make that never got made. But because I ended up having a lot of meetings, now I’ve essentially been able to cast anything I’ve made since then with people I [originally] wanted to put in that movie. The following spring, I saw Terence Davies’ “Sunset Song” and was completely blown away by your performance. What path did that character set you on?

AD: I think about Terence [Davies] regularly, probably weekly. I finished that film and thought, “Oh, I suppose that I am an actor now.” I said that to Terence, and he said, “Well, of course, you are.” I remember thinking someone believed in me a million times more than I believed in myself as an actor and as a woman. He gave me a huge responsibility to carry a film he’s been trying to make for 15 years. Making that film, I went from being a girl to a woman. His projection of what a woman is helped me embody what I had in myself.

 

Shirt, $435 at BodeNewYork.com; Pants, $400 at SimonMillerUSA.com

ARP: How did that change the bar you’ve now set for yourself?

AD: I knew that I wanted to play strong women with a point of view who have something to say. “Sunset Song” and “Hard Sun” are so different, but it was kind of a continuation. Elaine [in “Hard Sun”] is this damaged but strong and enigmatic woman who seems kind of genderless and walks to the beat of her own drum. I have a very English way of being apologetic. I didn’t have that kind of “F you” attitude, and [the director] drilled that out of me very quickly. It was fast-paced, the story matter was intense. It almost killed me, but it was exhilarating to play her.

ARP: I don’t know how long the shoot for “Sunset Song” was, but with [“Hard Sun”], suddenly you’re a sprinter who has to run a marathon without training for it. 

AD: Definitely. It was such a shock. I remember saying to Jim [co-star Sturgess] after we’d done the first two episodes, “We’ve got to do this again, haven’t we?” And he was like, “Yeah.” Like a marathon, you’re not sure how you’re going to save your energy and your feelings because you don’t know how much you’ll need at the end.

ARP: Now, you can’t just say yes to some TV show that won’t be satisfying.

AD: Exactly. I have the same sensation about the movie [“Her Smell”] you and I are doing together.

 

“Making that film, I went from being a girl to a woman … It almost killed me, but it was exhilarating to play her. ”

 

ARP: We’re not asking you to come in and be this mysterious, elfin, British model-type woman. There’s music lessons involved, there’s a certain theatricality involved. We’re setting up a series of extreme challenges. 

AD: I can’t wait. It’s funny because I know I’m so excited and so terrified before a job when I start dreaming about it. I woke up this morning after having a nightmare about actually being in the band: “Oh my God, oh s–t. I don’t know the song.”

ARP: The sort of all-encompassing logistical panic of this movie is something I’ve never really experienced. 

 

Rosie Assoulin overalls, $1,695 at ModaOperandi.com; Sweater, $325 at SimonMillerUSA.com 

AD: Where did you get the idea of making this film?

ARP: I wondered, what could I be doing that no one else would be doing right now? A lot of people can make something inspired by an era 50 years removed. Maybe I do a music movie about a disreputable genre no one’s really romanticizing in the same way yet. But it’s so much more about [the] identity of all these women in this movie — motherhood and sisterhood within these bands, and addictions and addictions to people. 

AD: I always say ’79 was such a great year for music in England, with the Clash and all these brilliant bands. It was amazing to be a young person and introduced to them by different friends. It shapes you as a person. So, it’s a fun way to explore it all again and also hear everyone else’s stories.

ARP: I’ve jokingly said this is a role you’ve been preparing to inhabit for your entire life, via modeling or acting. Maybe “mysterious, ethereal rock goddess” was a career path that may [have] eluded you, but now you get to use your lifetime’s worth of knowledge to be in this character.

AD: I remember seeing images early on of the Slits and the Raincoats — these young women just doing what they wanted. It was just so exhilarating to think like, “Oh, I can be that.”

 

 

ABOUT THE SPACE

We photographed Agyness Deyn at a lower-Manhattan pied-à-terre tucked inside the 1879-built Robbins & Appleton Building, with interiors designed by Mark Zeff. Commissioned by a Miami-based couple, the Bond Street residence showcases the duo’s diverse collection of special artworks by renowned creators such as Andy Warhol. The designer was charged with maintaining the raw loft’s distinct character while also creating intimacy for the couple and their teen children. Using ribbed glass and blackened steel, Zeff partitioned the 4,500 sqaure-foot space into wonderfully dramatic tableaus, including a glass-box study and an airy kitchen designed for entertaining.

 

 

On the cover: Blazer, $1,695, and pants, $1,295, both at RosieAssoulin.com; “Elsa” earrings, $740 at AgmesNYC.com

Photos by Martien Mulder; Styling by Danielle Nachimani, Hair by Seiji using Oribe Hair Care for The Wall Group; Beauty by Gianpaolo Ceciliato using Chanel Plaette Essentielle for Tracey Mattingly Agency; Bond Street Photo by Eric Laignel

 

alexa BlackBook: IKEA Fever

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IKEA has long been a staple for both bargain hunters and streamline-design lovers. Now, fashion kings like Virgil Abloh (just named Louis Vuitton’s new menswear designer) are repurposing the store’s iconic blue-and-yellow logo on inventive streetwear. 
 In honor of the Swedish fever, we asked three creatives for their takes on Ikea’s iconic “Frakta” bag.

 

Brooklyn garden whiz Brook Klausing recycled his “Frakta” bag as a pretty planter.

 

Brook Klausing, a garden designer and owner of Brooklyn’s Brook Landscape, elected to use his “Frakta” bag as a flower planter, putting his own spin on eco-upscaling. “We drew inspiration from fast fashion and fast furniture to create our own version: fast foliage,” he tells Alexa.

 

LA artist Neil Raitt adorned the trusty tote with his own palm print.

 

Los Angeles-based artist Neil Raitt (who points to Bob Ross’ kitschy 1980s TV program “The Joy of Painting” as an inspiration for his repetitive landscapes — on exhibit at LA’s Anat Ebgi gallery and this year’s NYC Armory Show) also took a crack at the big blue bag. He inlaid a palm-tree print, which he originally created in 2016 for an exhibition at Mon Chéri gallery in Brussels, to create a portable piece of art.

“When you look at an Ikea bag, with its blue plastic and yellow lettering, it’s immediately recognizable,” he says. “So, I wanted to bring in something equally accessible, like a palm tree.”

 

Interior designer Ryan Korban stitched a kitschy pillow — complete with Ikea trim.

 

And finally, New York-based interior designer Ryan Korban (who’s created eye-catching spaces for all manner of high-end fashion labels, including Alexander Wang’s NYC flagship and Balenciaga stores across the globe) dreamed up a DIY Ikea throw pillow. It’s the perfect spot to rest your head after putting together all that furniture.

 

Photos by Lizzy Snaps Sullivan; Tamara Beckwith; Courtesy of Neil Raitt and Anat Ebgi.

 

Is it Fall Yet? Our Favorite NYFW Collections We Can’t Wait to Wear

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Alexander Wang F/W ’18

 

Is it just us or is fall fashion just so much better than spring? That was definitely the case at the NYFW FW18 shows the past two weeks. And so while most New Yorkers might be pining for spring sunshine throughout this temperamental (but mostly cold) Northeast winter, we find ourselves counting down the days until September finally returns, and we can look cute again.

From Matrix-inspired office wear at Alexander Wang to ’80s power suits at Marc Jacobs and ’00s-era Paris Hilton puppy vibes at Gauntlett Cheng, we’ve compiled here our favorite Fashion Week moments – plus two honorable mentions because, well, we just couldn’t bear to narrow it down.

 

Alexander Wang

 

 

We’ve loved Alexander Wang since he first debuted his part minimalist, part rock ‘n’ roll It-girl uniforms; but we have to say, the last few seasons have left us with a never-ending #WANGOVER. This season, though, the San Fransisco born designer channeled The Matrix-meets-The Office, delivering a range of post-apocalyptic professional wear that we want every piece of – especially, the fur-lined ’90s CK-inspired undies.

 

Marc Jacobs

 

 

Marc Jacobs is basically the Alexander Wang of the late ’90s. So, needless to say, we’re giant fans. But much like last season’s awful #WANGOVER, Marc has fallen off a bit the last few years. I mean, remember the dreadlocks fiasco? Still, it seams Jacobs got the memo (or finally found it again), and this season felt like a return to form. Part ’80s power suit, part goth noir, the Marc Jacobs FW18 collection felt like Bianca Jagger in her white suit days, if she had Grace Jones’ attitude and Siouxsie’s sense of color. What more could you possibly as for?

 

Eckhaus Latta

 

 

One of fashion’s favorite new brands, Eckhaus Latta has mastered minimalism in its purest form. For their FW18 collection, designers Mike Eckhaus and Zoe Latta built upon the easy going feel of their last few seasons, but experimented more with shape and color than they ever have before. While the knits and sheer dresses fit right into the Eckhaus Latta playbook, bright yellow flowy fabrics were a new look for the brand. Overall, the collection was bold but understated, yet what Eckhaus Latta does best isn’t actually their clothes. Season after season, and despite its growing popularity, the brand remains dedicated to its outsider ethos. And did we mention their casting always rules? This season saw a diverse runway filled with New York City favorites, including model Paloma Elsesser and indie rock royalty Coco Gordon-Moore.

 

Tom Ford

 

 

Nobody does sleek and sexy like Tom Ford. This season, the designer went all in with leopard print, mixing loud colors with the even louder print in all different sizes from head-to-toe. Not only did each look feel totally timeless, you’ve got to give it to someone who can make lime green or bright red leopard print look not only classy, but cool.

 

Chromat

 

 

Another one of the fashion industry’s favorite young designers, Becca McCharen-Tran built Chromat to empower women of all shapes, sizes and colors. While most brands have embraced a long overdue push for diversity on the runway (not looking at you, Stefano Gabbana), Chromat also delivers it IRL. With a focus on emerging technology and body positivity, the label pushes boundaries and challenges the fashion status quo. For her latest collection, McCharen stuck with oranges and neons, accessorizing each look with Flaming Hot Cheeto bags tied to models’ pants and in their hands. Rapper Slay Rizz finished out the show with a killer performance in an orange two-piece by Chromat, and even though we didn’t get any cheese puffs to go, we were sold.

 

Dion Lee

 

 

Since launching his eponymous label in 2009, Australian designer Dion Lee has consistently delivered classic yet forward-thinking clothing, with his FW18 collection serving as further proof of his talent. Outfitting traditional sportswear looks with architectural bra-tops, it seems Lee also watched The Matrix and The Office before designing his collection. But unlike Wang’s, the Dion Lee range felt modern, not futuristic – the Neo influence was subtle. Lee also brought in more feminine elements, juxtaposing the structured suits and tops with flowy skirts.

 

Gypsy Sport

 

 

Ever since winning the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund in 2015, Rio Uribe has been making waves with his brand Gypsy Sport. Inspired by New York City, Uribe turned heads last year when he decided to present his Spring collection in Paris. But for FW18, Uribe returned to the city, thank god. Other than that, though, this was an all new Gypsy Sport. Over the last few years, the brand has become recognizable for their upcycled jerseys and I <3 NY logo tees, with the Gypsy Sport name in place of the heart. This season, Uribe ditched the streetwear element, presenting a romantic collection filled with suits and gothic ruffles, as well as a few sustainable aluminum looks. Of course, the designer stuck to his habit of using friends and members of the LGBTQ community as models, including 10-year-old activist and drag star Desmond is Amazing, who stole the show (and probably all of Fashion Week). Known for his willingness to experiment, it’s hard to tell whether this collection was a one-off, or the evolution of the brand. Either way, it doesn’t really matter, because whatever Gypsy Sport does is really, really good.

 

Adam Selman

 

 

Another CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund alum, Adam Selman won Fashion Week in our book. The FW18 collection was kinky, it was campy, it was part John Waters, part new wave, it was punk as fuck. Featuring a collaboration with artist Cheyco Leidmann, who created the surrealist prints Selman used on dresses and shirts, the range was bold and colorful, mixing prints, patterns and styles in an ode to photographer Ypsitylla Von Nazareth. In addition to the outfits, Selman also debuted his latest collection for sunglasses brand Le Specs. If you haven’t already been spotting his metallic cat-eyes for the last few years, get ready – this season’s heart-adorned versions are about to be everywhere. We want ours now.

 

Vaquera

 

 

Most people had never heard of New York City brand Vaquera before last NYFW, when they debuted a dress made only of blue and gold credit cards. For some reason, the look ended up on every news outlet, even though it was one of the weakest of the show. (We’re not saying we didn’t like it – we did.) What Vaquera does best is their more subtle work. This season, the designers seemed to realize that as well, presenting a range of deconstructed pieces that were delicate and cool. The highlights: an oversized blazer dress, cropped suit and crazy snakeskin skirt that all looked like they were slightly unfinished, but in reality, took forever to make. And isn’t that the best stuff anyway? The kind that costs, like, $10,000, but looks like you got it in the back of Duane Reade.

 

Calvin Klein

 

 

Oh, Raf. There’s literally nothing he could do at this point that would make us angry, because every collection he sends down the runway is as close to perfect as it gets. After presenting a men’s collection for his namesake label earlier in the week that revolved around Christiane F. and Cookie Mueller’s Drugs, Simons presented a classic Calvin Klein collection that took all of his quirky eccentricities and somehow made them look, well, classic as fuck. I mean, who else could send swimming caps and sweatshirt-less hoodies down the runway, without looking like he’s trying to be avant-garde? No one. And that’s part of his charm. Unlike a lot of of designers who, when they take over a storied brand, start to lose their individual voice, Raf’s seems to get only louder with each season, and we can’t wait to see what happens next.

 

Jeremy Scott

 

 

We have to be honest when we say that we love Moschino, but have never really caught the Jeremy Scott bug. That is, until this season, where Scott went full-on Fifth Element, with futuristic space-inspired looks. For those of you that don’t know, Jean Paul Gaultier did the costumes for The Fifth Element, and it’s basically a 2-hour fashion orgasm. So, when Scott sent Gigi Hadid down the runway in a silver overall dress, pink crop-top and matching pink LeeLoo-inspired wig – well, we almost stood up to give him immediate applause. The rest of the collection was equally amazing, with all of it feeling retro-futuristic without trying too hard. The key was nothing felt too much like a costume, just the uniform for a school in 2064.

 

Honorable Mentions

Telfar

 

 

This was Telfar Clemons’ second collection since winning the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, and though it was impeccable, it was the presentation that really kicked ass. Following the runway show that saw Clemons’ solidify his gender neutral ’70s aesthetic, singer/performer Dev Hynes, rapper Ian Isiah, Kelela, Oyinda, 070 Shake and Kelsey Lu took the stage for an intimate performance. The result was emotional yet understated, just like the collection itself.

 

Gauntlett Cheng

 

 

We’re big fans of Esther Gauntlett and Jenny Cheng’s self-aware brand that makes clothes for cool girls all over the world. This season, the duo went Westminster – or maybe Paris Hilton circa 2002. Either way, we were obsessed with the high fashion pieces they presented on models and a group of pups.

 

All photos courtesy of Vogue Runway