Le Fooding: The Brooklyn Version

The famous French eating festival has finally arrived in Brooklyn, which, some might say, has the most European restaurant scene in New York. Created by Alexandre Cammas in Paris, Le Fooding has spread a concept of modern, edgier, and culture-focused eating in France, New York, and Milano for the last twelve yeras. Now, after three turns in NYC, Le Fooding has concentrated its efforts in Brooklyn.

And you, dear readers, can buy tickets for the event early by clicking this link.

This year they have four main events: Le Clicquot Brooklyn tour, cinematic brunches, Le Fooding lunches at the flea markets, and the Le Fooding Campfire Session. For the Clicquot Brooklyn Tour, they will feature four $75 dinners, complete with a half bottle of Veuve Clicquot, that pair Brooklyn chefs with their foreign “twins.” Meaning at the September 19 dinner, Brian Leth, the Vinegar Hill House chef, will cook with Vinny Dotolo and Jon Shook, the guys from the popular Los Angeles restaurant Animal. On the 20th, you get a lovely pairing of Frankies 457 Spuntino’s owners Frank Castronovo and Frank Falcinelli with southern darling Sean Brock, who runs the farm-to-table joint Husk in Charleston, North Carolina. For the third dinner, they have Neal Harden and Alain Senderens preparing a vegan meal with the Paris-based chef Daniel Rose. Finally, the last meal of the series features a nomadic feast where Le Fooding organizers have opened up a kitchen in Dustin Yellin’s new building, The Intercourse, to host great chefs who currently don’t have their own restaurant. This means you can sample fare by British chaps Isaac McHale and James Lowe of the Young Turks, Ignacio Mattos, formally of Isa, and Hugue Dufour, formally of M. Wells.

The cinematic brunches will be held September 22 and 23 at Nitehawk Cinema in Williamsburg, and they plan on screening Brooklyn classics like Saturday Night Fever and The Warriors to pair with dishes that represent the borough. Also on the 22nd and 23rd, the Fort Greene and Williamsburg flea markets will open up a food stand featuring vintage eats by various Le Fooding chefs. Finally, for the last night, they will have the Campfire Session, an energetic event at the Brooklyn Waterfront with live music and, of course, more food. 

This event will sell out, so get your tickets early!

Tour de Brooklyn: A Borough Grub Crawl

Last weekend Bon Appetit magazine teamed up with Belvedere Vodka and Chase Sapphire to take a tour of the ever-expanding Brooklyn Food scene. Focusing on three key neighborhoods, Cobble Hill, Williamsburg, and Red Hook, the tours worked to really highlight some of the areas’ best food options, while making it walker-friendly.

I was lucky enough to join Friday’s Cobble Hill grub crawl and started out at Frank Castronovo and Frank Falcinelli’s Italian inspired restaurant Frankies 457 Spuntino. The joint was packed inside, but luckily we ducked out into the garden to sip a berry-ripe lambrusco and nibble on seasonal crostini. The way the tour worked was that they had four groups of people intermittently going to one of the four spots where we stayed for about 45 minutes. Frankies proved a good place to start, but our next stop felt a little awkward.

Dessert before dinner, anyone? Not that I am actually complaining. Given our tour took us to Kim Ima’s brick-and-mortar location of Treats Truck and to a pile of luscious peanut butter and chocolate sandwich cookies, it was a win-win situation. We followed that up with Clover Club and had a lovely punch by cocktail goddess Julie Reiner, who was actually there explaining her drink, giving us a recipe, and then pouring up their house drink comprised of raspberries and Dorothy Parker gin. We ended the night at Seersucker and sampled chef Robert Newton’s sinful fried chicken, fluffy biscuits, pimento cheese, and the Thirsty Owl Riesling that they have on tap. All together, the tour did highlight some of the hottest spots in the neighborhood right now.

On Saturday they covered Williamsburg and smartly chose Rye for cocktails, Maison Premiere for oysters, and Brooklyn Winery for a tour and wine tasting. The other two places I was less impressed with and would have skipped, one of which was Allswell because, frankly, it’s not anything special. Same for the jaunt to the Meatball Shop; while it’s delicious, there’s nothing Brooklyn about it given its two other locations in Manhattan. Sunday’s food crawl took place in Red Hook and did the neighborhood well by hitting up Stumptown Coffee Roasters, trying St. John Frizell’s southern-style Fort Defiance, eating Korean breakfast at The Good Fork, filling up on smoked meat at Mile End, and dancing at the historical bar Sunny’s.

Overall, the folks behind the tour did well to give a broad sampling of the neighborhoods that you can easily walk around in. The only other location I would have included is Prospect Heights where you can easily indulge in seasonal nibbles from The Vanderbilt, cocktails at Weather Up, ramen at Chuko, and oysters at Cornelius—but I guess that’s a good excuse to do that one on my own.