Synth-Pop Singer-Songwriter Charli XCX Talks True Romance, Tasting Sweat, & Lena Dunham

Charli XCX is no newbie to the music scene, though her age might indicate otherwise to those not in the know. The 20-year-old Brit, born Charlotte Aitchison but recognized by her hotly debated stage name, has been making people move since she was an adolescent.

At 14, XCX was already on the radar, albeit far from mainstream, discovered on MySpace and invited to play raves at the weekend. An only child, her parents would drive her to and from performances—sometimes staying, watching on like ever-adoring chaperones—then take her to school come Monday. What might have remained a fond memory or a passing phase, however, evolved into a career, with a capital “c,” her warehouse party past giving rise to a girl who knew her pop hooks and dance beats.

The past half-decade has seen her morph from girl to woman, as well as release several solid songs, among them one of her best, “Nuclear Seasons.” At 16 she signed a record deal, catapulting the former club kid from promising act to legitimate artist with a single signature. For the past four years she’s worked towards today, which sees her major label release of True Romance. Her lyrical prowess and knack for catchiness continue to impress with this sweeping and anthemic debut, a 13-track album featuring favorites like “Lock You Up,” “What I Like” and “Cloud Aura.”

XCX, who also co-wrote Icona Pop’s “I Love It,” (which, if you’ll recall, was a huge hit following a particularly entertaining episode of HBO’s Girls) is currently touring Europe and the U.K. with Ellie Goulding, and will touch down in the States come May. New Yorkers can catch her supporting Marina and the Diamonds at Rumsey Playfield on May 29 and alongside Little Daylight on May 31 at Glasslands Gallery.

In the meantime, hear from the hard-hitting goth-pop princess herself. She’s got plenty to say, from her outlook on love (which she’s in, with Ryan Andrews) to her fantasies surrounding calling all the concert shots (think outlandish creative direction as it pertains to set design, à la Girls dreamboat douchebag Booth Jonathan).

You titled the album True Romance. Is this record the embodiment of “true romance,” to you? It’s such a bold statement to make. To say, like, Here it is. This is the definition.
This record is, for me, what true romance is. I’ve been writing the record for the past two to three years, but one song I wrote when I was 16. So, I feel like I’ve been writing this album as I’ve been growing up. Your views on love and life change over time. You experience different relationships, that kind of thing, and I think the record is kind of about that. It’s about love from different angles. Different periods of your life. There’s a bratty breakup song, when you went out with a bad boy. Then there’s a song about falling in epic, amazing, real, true love. And I feel like that’s what happened to me during the process of writing this album. I feel like I’ve fallen in love, massively. I feel like the record looks at how you can be on this love trip, in this dream state, but at the same time you can feel lonely and isolated. I think it’s interesting how schizophrenic love is. And that’s what the record is to me. It’s schizophrenic. It sounds that way. It sounds like love.

Did the title come at the end?
The title came last, actually. It was kind of, like, a reflection. I never wanted to make a concept album and come up with the title track and write songs around the title. I wanted to write the songs as naturally as possible and as naturally as they came to me. It just so happened they were about love. Once I started writing them, I supposed that was an appropriate title.

Makes sense. Can you tell me a bit about being so young coming up in the music scene?  
It was kind of crazy. At the beginning, I was very, very excited about everything. I was 15, signing a record deal. I was so elated by it. So, whenever there were highs and lows—which there definitely were, and still are—I took them really personally. It was a quite traumatic experience making this album, especially when I was younger. It can be emotional making an album, putting all your thoughts and feelings on a CD. I found the industry very difficult. There were so many expectations I thought I had to live up to. I was unsure who I was. I wrote the song “Stay Away” then. I began to find myself and what kind of music I wanted to make. I feel like I’ve changed a lot. I realized I don’t have any criteria I need to meet. I’m just doing my thing. I’m not feeling like I have to please anyone.

Even with the tumult, it had to have been a blast.
It was really fun. When I was younger, I’d go to raves, and that was crazy. Then, I’d go to school on Monday, and that was weird. But, it was cool. I kind of feel like I got sucked into that. I’m glad I left that scene and started making real music on my own.

Oh, yes. You’re talented, your debut’s a gem and, on top of that, you’ve traveled the world touring in support of Coldplay, Santigold, Ellie Goulding. Was it difficult to adjust to the limelight? MySpace and late-night raves are one thing, but stadiums are another thing all together. That’s rock star status.
For me, I can’t think about going on stage as the “limelight.” I think about it as playing my songs for people and losing my mind. When I’m on stage, I feel completely free. I feel completely inspired. I’m not thinking about anything else. I’m getting lost in the moment. It’s like one big trip.

Speaking of trip, do you have a favorite place to play?
I love America. I love L.A. and I love New York. And I haven’t been there yet, but I know I’m going to love Tokyo so much when I go. It sounds so magical.

It does. So, which one: New York or L.A.?
I don’t know. People compare them, but they’re so different. It’s so difficult to compare the two. I feel like L.A., maybe, for me, just because it’s so different from London. Whereas New York is so similar.

Aww, shucks. So, do you have any down time when you tour?
Never. It’s constant. But, that’s fine. It feels good to play shows and have people come listen to my music. That’s really nice. I mean, it’s weird doing promo every day. You have to talk about yourself all the time, and I don’t really like doing that. It’s just strange. I’m starting to get used to it. It’s all right.

You’re adjusting. How’s tour going so far with Ellie?
It’s fun. The crowds are big. She’s cool. I think I managed to convert her into a platform shoe-lover. She tried on my Buffalo platforms and was like, Oh my god, these are amazing!

How would you compare the experience of performing at big venues versus small?
Playing big venues is always less personal. Like, when I was doing the Coldplay tour, there were, like, seven screens. Only the front, like, five rows can see you up close. But, in a club it’s wild. You can taste everyone’s sweat, which I really like. I feel so much more alive. You can really get in touch with the crowd and make it, like, an apocalyptic, end of the world party. So, I really like that. Obviously, it’s a dream to play in front of as many people as possible, so big stages are good. But, when I have my own massive shows, I want the walls and ceilings and floors to be made of screens. So you’re in a screen box. And it’s, like, my favorite videos and mash-ups of my favorite movies playing. It’d be a mindfuck.

Do you watch Girls?
Yeah! Like that artist [Booth Jonathan]’s thing. Exactly like that, except on a massive scale.

That’s also, as you know, the episode featuring the song you wrote, performed by Icona Pop.
That was really cool. I’m a big Lena Dunham fan. I feel like she’s this sexy, hilarious, fierce super-girl. So, it was really cool seeing her singing that song. It was quite funny.

Is Hannah your favorite character on the show?
I don’t know. I also really like Adam. And I really like Shoshanna. And I love to hate Jessa, because I know so many people like that and they’re so frustrating.

Do you have a lot of super-fans?
I do, actually. They’re all sweet, but they’re crazy. It’s cute, though. They’re all young. They message me all the time. Like, everyday. It freaks me out that my music can mean that much to someone. I didn’t have that. Even if I did, I wouldn’t have had the power to tell them, because I didn’t have Twitter. Now, everyday, you can build up this false relationship in your mind. It’s scary. It’s mad.

I’d agree with that. After all this, the journey so far, what do your parents think?
They’re proud. Whenever I’m in London they’ll come to my show. They’re really supportive. They took me to the raves when I was younger, came with me and were really cool. I’m really thankful for that, actually.

That’s awesome. I imagine a lot of parents wouldn’t be as nurturing when it comes to their young daughter rocking the sometimes seedy rave scene. You also dress pretty provocatively. From where does your aesthetic sensibility derive?
I’m really inspired by movies. The Craft. Clueless. Empire Records. I just love that nineties aesthetic. I like basics, grungy stuff. I’m a big fan of the Spice Girls. Some of their music videos are my favorites. Like, “Say You’ll Be There.” I feel like I came through the third wave of the club kids in London. I was watching Party Monster, finding out who Michael Alig was. Part of me will always be interested in that world. DIY, but high fashion at the same time.

So, do you have a dream collaboration?
I’d love to work with Bjork. She’s incredible. I admire everything she does. Her voice is like butter. So angry but so sweet and beautiful at the same time. I think she’s wonderful.  

Whose music are you really into right now?
Jai Paul. I’ve always been a big fan of his. Kitty Pryde. I think she’s really cute. I love her lyrics. I always listen to the same stuff on repeat. Like, Uffie, Kate Bush, The Cure. Robert Smith is, like, my hero.

Last but not least, what would you be doing if not this?
I’d be crying probably. 

The Hold Steady Performing Original Song By George R.R. Martin

It’s that time again—time for some Game of Thrones news to tide you over until Season 3 begins (It’s so soon, you guys! You’re all doing so great.). Following up on The National’s performance of George R.R. Martin’s original House Lannister conquest anthem “The Rains of Castamere” last season, the show is embracing even more rock musicians, including Coldplay drummer Will Champion and Snow Patrol frontman Gary Lightbody, who both have cameo roles this season.

And another Game of Thrones song is coming soon, too. America’s favorite bar band, The Hold Steady, has been tapped to perform “The Bear and the Maiden Fair,” a “boisterous tavern song” written by George R.R. Martin and GoT theme music composer Ramin Djawadi. The song tells the story, unsurprisingly, of a bear who tries to woo a maiden fair. Partnerships with Brewery Ommegang and an old-timey tavern song sung by The Hold Steady? There is a very specific bro demographic HBO is trying to court here with their marketing, methinks.

Just imagine Craig Finn singing Martin’s verses:

“A bear there was,”

“A bear, A BEAR!

“All black and brown,”

“And covered with hair!

“Oh come they said,”

“Oh come to the fair!”

“The fair? said he,

“But I’m a bear!”

“All black and brown,”

“And covered in hair!”

Let’s hope this song makes it into their live sets. Sadly, there’s no recording of this yet, but there will be soon, and the band will release a 7” of it as a Record Store Day recording. In the meantime, let’s listen to The National’s “The Rains of Castamere” again, especially because it includes some rather unfortunate foreshadowing of a big and violent event that will happen this season.

[via Entertainment Weekly]

Luke James Talks Writing Songs, the State of R&B, and ‘Whispers in the Dark’

Fresh off his packed-house performance at SOB’s in New York, and in the glow of his recently and readily downloadable, smooth-operated mixtape Whispers in the Dark, Luke James is not just your next R&B heartthrob: he’s suited up to be one of the next great masterminds of music with both production and singing talents in spades. As "Who Is Luke James" is the seducing veneer of his internet presence (follow him on Twitter at @whoislukejames), you’ll be well advised to directly listen to his incandescent collection of abundant affection, compassion, and empathy for the open-hearted.

I talked to James about the making of what you’re about to hear, his take on the state of R&B, movies that remain influential to his craft and how James wishes to be understood as a kind of Prince the Redeemer for the forgotten sake of letting love rule for the new year and in later days. (And to reiterate again, ladies, he is a dreamboat.)

I did a little research and I came across the fact that you were a songwriter before you launched your solo career. I was curious to know what were some of your favorite songs you’ve written for other people? Like you almost wished you kept that song for yourself!
I loved the Justin Bieber song "That Should Be Me" that I co-write with The Messengers. Great record. I dealt with the song, so naturally it was a great feeling. And it kind of felt like something I would want to do as an artist myself. There’s one I did with Chris Brown: "Crawl." Love that one. And the song I did with Tank off of his latest album, "This I How I Feel." It has a really good vibe.

So you are Grammy-nominated this year! I wanted to know, how does it honestly feel like to be nominated. Keep it real! Are you truly happy just to be recognized, or do you really just want to win?
I’m thrilled to be acknowledged, especially for this gift and this talent I’ve been working so hard on. To be acknowledged and be seen as a vocalist and performer, and to be in a category of Best Male R&B Performance, is awesome, and especially by the Grammy committee—that’s the height of our music business. It’s awesome.

And specifically for a song that the fans online have been referring to as a "panty-dropping" single! I read comments and the female fan base is just growing. They seem to really appreciate and adore your appreciation of women all-around.
Wow! I’ll definitely try to keep that going!

Tell us more about the album title Whispers in the Dark. It’s enigmatic enough to lead someone to think, "Well, what does he mean by that?" But also, it makes sense in that if you’re in the dark, you’re not trying to make a lot of sense—most likely—so, it can be interpreted quite a few ways.
Well, Whispers in the Dark is a line I used in a song I have on my official album, and the song is basically like, “Whispers in the dark tend to you call you where you are.” Put it like this: at night, I deal with my demons, whatever that is, good or bad, and it’s usually those voices you hear that make you recognize them; they’re calling you. I’m speaking from personal experience, but I feel like other people can relate to having those voices in your head and usually that happens when you’re alone, and that nighttime. That kind of vibe and of the unknown. You can’t see what’s there. [Laughs] Does that make sense?

Yeah, yeah it does! And I figured that, too. I just wanted to hear from you directly on and from the album’s perspective. I had my own idea?
And what was that?

Whispers in the Dark to me meant… just a very secretive moment whether with yourself or with someone, and you wouldn’t necessarily mind getting caught, either. And it doesn’t have to something physical that is happening. Just in the sense that someone just caught you; someone could potentially catch you.
Well, that’s exactly right! There are so many different ways of taking it. People always ask me about my music, “What do you want people to take from it?” It’s whatever makes them happy. Whatever feels good to them. As long as they take something.

That definitely leads to the next question, and it’s kind of a two-parter. I did see the video for "Make Love to Me," which I enjoyed and I peeped that Kelly Rowland cameo! But from watching it, I knew I wanted to ask you: do you consider yourself an old soul? While watching it, I was thinking, this is some Gerald Levert, Barry White, with a little bit of Marvin Gaye, and you kind of remind me of Prince, too.
I’ll take that!

And I thought of that because it’s not like today’s contemporary R&B where—and this is where the second part comes in—everyone seems to have an opinion on the state of R&B. Trey Songz said this; I interviewed Ne-Yo about it and he said it lacked soul; but when I was watching your video, you’re modern, but you also seemed to be harkening back to the greatness of traditional R&B, and I was just wondering about your thoughts on that. 
I pride myself on feeling. I can’t do it if I can’t feel it and I guess that exhibits through me. My thing is if I feel it, people can feel it. Also, I’m from New Orleans, and you’ll meet a lot of people of New Orleans, everybody from people we know like Lil Wayne to everyone else, that’s just the way people are raised. The way that city is, that part of town. It’s a very laid-back, soulful kind of place and I think naturally, that’s just how we are, I’m not the only one; it’s the upbringing. I’m surrounded by older people. I was just put on to a lot of things a lot of classic music early on and I guess it just came a part of me. That’s just how people are from New Orleans. And I also just really respect classic, great music of the past. They really laid out the foundation for actual feeling and in giving yourself completely without repercussions. It’s just saying, "I’m hurting." And people want to hear that.

And the state of R&B… I feel like you can’t judge art. Everybody has an interpretation. And this is a business. People got families to feed. So if you’re not buying the organic-feeling songs that everybody professes they want, but they’re not supporting it and want to freeload on, you can’t get mad at that person for switching to something sellable for the moment at least because it is a business. If you buy that kind of music, people will make what I like to call those personal songs. And when creating them, you’re taking a chance because not everybody’s going to play it, but in actuality, everybody cries. But I guess radio, and the labels, they aren’t willing to give it a chance. People haven’t been supporting that in the past. It takes a whole union of people to do it. One person can’t do it alone. One person can’t be speaking some knowledge and then other people are just trying to have a good time. Everybody has to be on the same, be promoting the same feeling. Let’s make music that you can feel and they will. Let’s say or teach somebody something. What’s going on? Let’s actually talk about what’s going on aside from the club. There’s life after the club.

Do you feel your music is more sexual, sensual, or atmospheric? How would you describe it?
It’s very emotional. Highs and lows. Ups and downs. I like "sensual." "Sexual" seems so physical. But I do think it’s a little bit of both. The mental, it’s soulful, and can be a physical thing. I would love for anyone listening to my music to start [feeling it] on the inside.

As for the songs on the mixtape, which ones were difficult to create? Or took a lot out of you emotionally?
The song "Oh God." I had that song, that composition from Danja. He had produced it. I had to live with it. When I first heard it, I had a structure, melody, and hook idea. But it just wasn’t happening for me and I had to put it back in the oven. Just wait for it to come to me. And one day I went back into the booth, and did it. It was tough.

And now a common question. What can we look forward to from you next year in 2013?
Oh, man! Hopefully a lot more Luke James! I am still working on the project [my debut LP]. Everyday, everyday. I’m learning something new, so I’m just going to keep recording until the official release date. Keep promoting myself and hopefully join this new movement of great music and new faces that are coming and just helping music transition to a more beautiful place where everyone is somewhat pleased. I’m also getting into acting and hopefully that will be something that will jump off.

TV or film first?
I would love to do film.

What are some of your favorite movies?
Mo’ Betta Blues. The Lost Boys. Purple Rain. Glory. I like different genres of movies. I like Manhattan by Woody Allen. I love his movies because they’re kind of cerebral. He’s almost like a contrast to Spike Lee, yet I find their films similar.

Both often based in New York City…
I like Spike Lee movies too. That’s where I’m at.

Is there a genre of music that you haven’t toyed with and experimented with yet and would like to? Because again, from the video and mixtape, I was thinking it was jarring to me—in a good way—how it sounded so different from stuff I hear today and it’s why I compared you to those legends. And I thought, "I wonder if he would ever do a song with David Guetta?"
With the music, I always want to take it to another level. Another foundation. It’s got to be like a dream. Where else can you take it? That’s how I want my music to feel. I like a vibe, and I don’t care if it takes seven minutes long to express it. It’s music. So, I don’t know… maybe alternative. I like to think of my music as classic R&B with the alternative and spiritual. I merge those things. Like Coldplay has a lot of soul. You can tell those boys went to church. Those songs just take you somewhere. Those chords, and how Chris [Martin] sings certain lines and what they say. And I just think my interpretation is all of that. I think everything I love you hear it in the music. And when the actual album comes out, you’ll hear more of where I want to go.

Last, last question! You touched on this earlier, but possibly explain more. What do you want your female fans—and male fans, too—to get from you?
One thing I want to say is that it’s OK to feel. We live in such a numb world, but it’s still a feeling because we know it’s numb. We fight it, but it’s OK to express your feelings and know what you want. Go for it. Life is too short to not fully live. I’m learning how to be in the moment and just say like, "Wow. I’m nominated for a Grammy. This is awesome." To really bask in it instead of being like, "OK. Nominated for a Grammy. What’s the next thing?" I’m trying to hold in on my feelings and become one with it. So, if I had anything to say to both the guys and the girls is that it’s OK to feel. It’s OK to rock side to side and say, "Oh my God, I love this." It’s OK to scream. At shows, people can be so uptight! And I move around a lot because I get so into my music. But also, I’m hoping I can help you guide your way out of that very thing you’ve been used to, to this new thing that is not really new. You expressed yourself when you were a child. You weren’t afraid to cry and express your feelings. Now that you’re older, we have this tough skin so we don’t show anyone we’ve got feelings. We’re human. And once people become more humanized, the world will be a better place, more full of love. If that makes any sense. Let’s make this fun again. Have fun, dammit!

Jay-Z to Headline Barclays Center’s First NYE Show With Coldplay

This fall, Jay-Z helped introduce the brand-new Barclays Center, the home of Hov’s Brooklyn Nets and the New York Islanders, to the people with a series of shows. And now, as Kanye West foretold on “Big Brother”: “I told Jay I did a show with Coldplay. Next thing I know, he got a show with Coldplay.”

Jay-Z and Coldplay have rang in the New Year together in Las Vegas before with Kanye West, Beyoncé and others, and now they’ll come together again for the first ever New Year’s Eve show at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. So now, Brooklynites who always set high expectations for New Year’s Eve only to have them bitterly demolished when you realize you’re forever alone or you have to take care of your drunk friend or something else generally goes awry, here’s your thing to maybe overbuild your expectations about. 

For a preview of what the NYE show may look like, here’s Jay-Z and Coldplay performing "Lost" together. 

Watch Coldplay’s Tribute to Beastie Boy Adam Yauch

After a long battle with cancer, Beastie Boys co-founder Adam Yauch, aka "MCA," died yesterday at the age of 47. Yauch’s passing elicited tributes from all over the music world, including one from Coldplay–and its frontman, Chris Martin–during the band’s concert last night at the Hollywood Bowl. After the jump, watch Martin and Co’s acoustic rendition of the seminal Beastie Boys classic, "(You Gotta) Fight for Your Right (To Party!) [via ONTD]

Evening Links: Blue Ivy Goes On Vacation, Justin Bieber Lends Song To ‘Bully’

● Three months old and Blue Ivy has already jetting town to spend the holiday weekend with her parents in St. Bart’s on a big ole’ yacht. [Rap-Up]

● Bravo’s Bethenny Frankel would like Mila Kunis to play the lead in the big-screen adaptation of her novel Skinnydipping. And as for everything else that goes into making a movie? She’ll figure that out later. [NYDN]

● Justin Bieber has graciously lent his song "Born to Be Somebody" to new Bully campaign. "My fans are always up for supporting a great cause," he explains. "I hope they see Bully with their friends and help start the conversation so we can end bullying." [MTV]

● Headed to the Hamptons this summer? Unfortunately for you, Coldplay’s drummer’s won the very last beach-parking permit, so you will have to plan accordingly. [NYDN]

● In order to pay back the IRS, Young Buck is selling all of his intellectual property, song composition and name included. So, uh, who’s buying? [Fuse]

● "Good luck dude, you are going to need it," is the best Kris Humphries can muster for Kanye West. [Radar]

Afternoon Links: Snooki Gets Engaged, Charlie Sheen Gets Back to Work

● This comes hardly as a shock, but word has it that Snooki has gone and gotten engaged to her baby dady, Jionni. [People]

● Odd Future’s Frank Ocean and the Roc’s new girl, Rita Ora, have been tapped to open for Coldplay on the band’s stadium tour through Europe this summer. [Rap-Up]

● Kim Kardashian let wedding guests know in a thank you note that she has donated twice the value of what she received in gifts to the Dream Foundation. Who says good things can’t come of 72-day weddings? [Us]

● At last, a Hunger Games-inspired fitness plan for all those hoping to be strong like a Career or swift like Katniss. [VF]

● Charlie Sheen is back to work, this time using his mad man rep to shill teeny-tiny but oh-so-expensive Fiats. [Time]

● Is there a posthumous Aaliyah album on the way? [Prefix]

Coldplay Says ‘No’ to Spotify

Spotify, the UK-based music-streaming platform, is the most recent savior in the never-ending line of record industry saviors. It has a problem, however, and that problem is the so-called “Biggest Band in the World.” Coldplay is not letting Spotify users listen to their new album, Mylo Xyloto, and they are also withholding their music from Rhapsody and other streaming services. Fans will have the purchase the album on iTunes or Amazon if they want to hear it, but that unfortunately leaves a paper trail proving you bought a Coldplay album.

Coldplay aren’t the first artists to withhold their music from streaming services. Adele and Tom Waits both did so with their new LPs, marking what’s become a worrisome trend for record and streaming companies alike. Users either pay a monthly fee for access to platforms like Spotify, or they agree to listen to ads. The streaming services then pay the record labels a small amount every time someone plays a track (CBS reports this is about 0.015 cents on Spotify), and that profit is divvied up into smaller fractions before it ever reaches the artists. Spotify told CBS they aren’t worried, and that they have “convinced millions of consumers to pay for music again.” This may be true, but just because people are paying for music doesn’t mean the artists get to see it. Jazz Summers, manager of British electropop artist La Roux, told the Independent, “Everyone told La Roux they were listening to her album on Spotify. We looked at her royalties from thousands of plays and she basically got nothing. She said: ‘Sod it, I’m taking it off. The royalties are barely enough to pay for a set of guitar strings’.” While Coldplay is just one artist, their new album is sure to be a top-seller and its omission from streaming services will be glaring. Spotify has about 15 million songs available for streaming, but if that number doesn’t steadily increase as new albums are produced, it may be back to the drawing board for anyone concerned with making money off of music.

Morning Links: Beyoncé Debuts Video For ‘Love On Top’, Sean Penn Calls the Tea Party Racist

● There have already been videos for “Run the World (Girls),” “1+1,” and “Countdown,” and now the New Edition-inspired “Love On Top” makes four from Four. [Beyoncé/YouTube] ● Sean Penn suspects that the Tea Party — or the “Get the N-Word Out of the White House Party,” as he thinks they might be more aptly called — has just one, very racist thought: “At the end of the day, there’s a big bubble coming out of their heads, saying, ‘Can we just lynch him?'” he told Piers Morgan. [THR] ● Lindsay Lohan faces another year and a half in the slammer if she is found guilty on Wednesday of violating her probation by skipping community service dates and therapy appointments. [TMZ]

● Meet Mary Kate and Ashley’s rising younger sister, Elizabeth, who has been careful to make sure her debut is as an adult actor rather than a child star. [NYT] ● “Alan,” a dead man whose body will be mummified “like an Egyptian pharaoh” on Britain’s Channel 4, just might be reality television’s first post-life star. [DailyMail] ● Coldplay named their upcoming album Mylo Xyloto because they wanted something “Un-Googleable” for their fifth album, and also because, as Chris Martin says, “Mylo” is “just a great name…for anything.” [NYT]

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