Chris Brown Is Being Sued By A Woman Alleging She Was Raped In His Home

 

A woman who alleges she was raped in his home by his friend, rapper Lowell Grissom Jr., is suing Chris Brown, Rolling Stone reports.

The plaintiff, referred to as Jane Doe, is being represented by high-profile attorney Gloria Allred, who said in a statement to RS“The lawsuit alleges that while she was at Brown’s house, plaintiff became the victim of horrific sexual assaults which are described in our lawsuit. That is why we have filed this case today alleging sexual battery, gender violence, a violation of Ralph Civil Rights Act, battery, assault, interference with the exercise of civil rights, intentional infliction of emotional distress and negligence.”

Doe had reportedly been hanging out at an afterparty at a recording studio with Brown and Grissom and another woman, Jane Doe X, where she had her phone confiscated. When the group relocated to Brown’s home, Brown gave both women a clear pill, and said to take the pill to have a “good time,” according to the lawsuit.

Doe did not take the pill, but, as the suit reports, was forced by Jane Doe X to perform oral sex on Grissom and then on X; Brown and Grissom refused to return her phone to her. After that, she was allegedly raped multiple times by Grissom before being able to obtain her phone and flee the scene, where she then “went to a rape treatment center and to the police where she reported the aforementioned events.”

Allred has called the case in a statement to press “one of the most horrific sexual assault cases [she has] ever seen.”

How The Club Handled The Chris Brown-Drake Brawl

Everyone is asking me about the Chris Brown/Drake thing at W.i.P. I’ve taken enough pot shots at the changing scene over there. I won’t further the gossip about how the seating was done, despite warnings to management not to do it like that. The ensuing brawl, I am told, was "inevitable.” Multiple sources told of the seating "roped off the way it was resembled a boxing ring.” I won’t talk about the report of a young gal needing and getting multiple stitches but reportedly not being helped by club security. My source said "she got 16 of them.” A couple of people talked of art by photog Scott Alger valued at 10K+ being destroyed. One employee texted me that "it was late on a good night and that Mary J. had left and it was all good"…until it wasn’t. They added: "it isn’t nearly as rough as Sunday". Since the NY Post and the big news organizations are all talking about this, and me and those W.i.P./Greenhouse guys are getting along after a bit of a rough spell… there is no need for me to even mention it.

Man-about-town Terry Casey will be celebrating his gazillionth birthday at La Zarza, that wonderful little spot on First Avenue and 10th Street. This is turning out to be a big deal, not because it’s Terry’s birthday – God knows he’s had lots of those – but because of the talented DJs who will be on hand. Stephen Luke the LIV Miami resident will join Xander Phoenix and innovative DJ Kris Graham. Kris was one of the originators of the now-everywhere House Music brunches. Back in 2002 Kris was doing Diva on West Broadway and joined forces with Roberto Burchielli who helped bring the European programming to Provocateur

It’s Been Said Before: Greenhouse & W.i.P. Have Reopened

The news that Greenhouse/W.i.P. has reopened for booziness is welcomed. Although there will be future legal back and forths, for now it can serve its adoring public which includes the fabulous Susanne Bartsch and Kenny Kenny’s Sunday night soiree. Last Sunday it was emails and Facebook messages and texts proclaiming it "on" and "off"… "on" and "off" until that game of musical chairs ended with…"off." I’m not a big fan of Greenhouse; I never go there, but I firmly believe that a club should not be held responsible for the bad behavior of its patrons unless management is either ignoring or complacent. Humans often behave badly… drunk humans more so. Bad behavior is to be expected on occasion. Accountability is important, but it is impossible to expect multi-million dollar investments in tax-generating, job-creating enterprises if a sword of closure hangs over operators’ heads for actions they may not reasonably be able to control. As much as I don’t listen to hip-hop or enjoy hip-hop-heavy parties, I surely recognize its impact on club culture and life in America in general. It is enjoyed by all demographics. The 800-pound gorilla that isn’t really spoken about is whether or not Greenhouse is being persecuted because this is an “urban thing.” A prince gets into a brawl at a chic meatpacking joint and closure isn’t an issue. Hey, this has been said before.

The city is scheduled to rule on a controversial plan to expand NYU’s village campus. According to many residents, this expansion will destroy the character of the neighborhood which has, of course, been a creative cauldron for NYC life as we know it for eons. We’re talking two million square feet in tall buildings with apparent loss of green areas and such. Worse than all that will be the expansion of the population of frat boys and frat girls and the changes their needs will bring. Mom and pop restaurants and quaint coffee shops will be gentrified out to accommodate student-friendly shops like 16 Handles and chain stores.

NYU is a dark force that should be pushed to areas like Wall Street or Brooklyn or Queens. The city has lost so much of its core character and can’t afford to be further compromised. Why do I care? Every few days I walk past the NYU Palladium Housing on 14th Street which once was this incredible theatre that I attended and then operated during my club years. I knew it as The Academy of Music where I saw The Clash, U2, The Cramps, and a long list of etceteras. I hung out there when it was the Palladium – the club – and saw early rock and dance. I operated it for Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager and came back to fill it a few other times for other moguls.

Once, when I was remodeling this beautiful 108,000-square-foot facility, I was prevented from nailing things into most walls or ceilings. I can’t find any official landmark references, but I was told at the time that it was one. It was protected because of its ancient and significant beauty…its recognized importance in design and architecture. I got married to my first wife there. I think it was its only wedding.

NYU came along…needed it …tore it down. The ultimate indignity is that when they built the Palladium Housing, they used the same logo or similar font as the legendary club. It’s fucking Mordor. This too has been said before.

Tonight I’ll be at White Rabbit DJing with a host of wonderful folks at the Tattoos & Art show at White Rabbit around 9 or 10pm or 10 to 11pm…you know how these things go… and, of course, this has been said before.

Chris Brown Announces He ‘Owns’ Rihanna’s Pussy

Chris Brown grabbed a microphone from a DJ and shared his highly sought-after relationship tips with a club.

 

The singer, who punched and strangled his girlfriend Rihanna in a vicious 2009 attack, told the audience at Emerson Theater in Hollywood on Thursday morning that the key to harmony is any straight relationship is for the girl to know who owns her pussy: her boyfriend. TMZ has video of Dr. Phil himself advising:

"Every guy in this building has said one thing to their female. If you’re not an insecure n***a and you let her have fun with her friends, I applaud you. You gotta say that one thing to her and I made this shit up, [sings] don’t make me have to tell you again, that that’s my pussy baby! It’s mine babe, babe, mine. Don’t make me have to tell you again, that that’s my pussy, baby. It’s mine, girl, it’s mine, girl, it’s mine. … so you better not give it away! So every person in this motherfucking building, if you got a bad bitch you better say that shit to her, or she might fuck another n***a."

In other news, Ryan Seacrest has reported that Rihanna is planning to take a year-long break from the music industry to make her terrible personal decisions in private. 

Email me at Jessica.Wakeman@Gmail.com. Follow me on Twitter.

Oh, Good: Rihanna’s Dad Thinks It’s Fine She And Chris Brown Are Back Together

These people.  

Rihanna’s father, Ronald Fenty, who has a past history of domestic abuse and drug addiction, told the UK’s Sunday Mirror newspaper that he’s A-OK with his daughter giving a "second chance" to the man who beat and strangled her:

Chris made a mistake… a terrible one. But I’m a great believer that everybody deserves a second chance and Chris is no different. Everybody goes wrong at some point. I certainly have. But it is how you come back and live your life which is important. And as long as she is happy then so am I. Everybody has had their say about her and Chris but it is up to her to find her own way. Chris has always been polite and kind to me and treated me with respect. That’s all you can ask from your daughter’s boyfriend.

That’s all you can ask from your daughter’s boyfriend? That’s … all?

These are Ronald Fenty’s first face-palmy comments about Chris Brown — back in October he said "Everyone adores Chris" and "he’s a super guy" and expressed hope that Chris Brown and Rihanna get married.  With family like this. it any wonder Rihanna settles for as little as she does?

Contact the author of this post at Jessica.Wakeman@Gmail.com. Follow me on Twitter.

Adele and Chris Brown Are Buds After All

Chris Brown created controversy, as is his wont, at the Grammys on Sunday evening simply without leaving his seat. People seemed enraged that Brown was not a better sport about losing an award to Frank Ocean, with whom he recently brawled in a Los Angeles parking lot a few weeks ago. People were also excited that a now-infamous photo taken on Sunday night depicted what many assumed was an argument between Adele and Brown; the truth, of course, is that Adele was not scolding Chris Brown. The British singer-songwriter claims she was "complimenting" Brown rather than yelling at him.

I’m no fan of Chris Brown, but it seems that the hatred toward him (which, by the way, is mostly fine with me) has reached insane levels. He didn’t stand up for Frank Ocean. So what? He also didn’t give Jack White a standing ovation after his performance the way that many of his neighbors in the audience did, but I didn’t see any animated .gifs of that. (By the way, congrats for spending the time in Photoshop to create a .gif of some dude sitting in his seat.) Chris Brown seems to like the attention—it’s part of his job, after all, to get it—but at this point he doesn’t even have to do anything to get people to complain about him. Give it up, folks. The best way to get someone to stop being famous is to stop paying attention to them.

Follow Tyler Coates on Twitter.

12-Year-Old Boy Charged With Punking Ashton Kutcher and the LAPD

There’s a new fad that all the kids are into: swatting. It involves calling 911 and claiming that there’s an armed person in a celebrity’s house. On the grand scale of things, I suppose it’s better than premarital sex or meth, but I suppose celebrities don’t see it that way. And neither does the LAPD, who, in response to several 911 calls recently, have sent armed SWAT teams to the homes of Tom Cruise, Chris Brown, and Justin Bieber. At least one kid—a 12-year-old—has been charged with making such a call that led the LAPD to send officers to Ashton Kutcher’s house. I’m not the only one who sees the irony in this, but can we really expect Kutcher to get all up in arms about this? It all has a very "I learned it from you Dad, I learned it from you!" feel about it. 

[via EW]

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Luke James Talks Writing Songs, the State of R&B, and ‘Whispers in the Dark’

Fresh off his packed-house performance at SOB’s in New York, and in the glow of his recently and readily downloadable, smooth-operated mixtape Whispers in the Dark, Luke James is not just your next R&B heartthrob: he’s suited up to be one of the next great masterminds of music with both production and singing talents in spades. As "Who Is Luke James" is the seducing veneer of his internet presence (follow him on Twitter at @whoislukejames), you’ll be well advised to directly listen to his incandescent collection of abundant affection, compassion, and empathy for the open-hearted.

I talked to James about the making of what you’re about to hear, his take on the state of R&B, movies that remain influential to his craft and how James wishes to be understood as a kind of Prince the Redeemer for the forgotten sake of letting love rule for the new year and in later days. (And to reiterate again, ladies, he is a dreamboat.)

I did a little research and I came across the fact that you were a songwriter before you launched your solo career. I was curious to know what were some of your favorite songs you’ve written for other people? Like you almost wished you kept that song for yourself!
I loved the Justin Bieber song "That Should Be Me" that I co-write with The Messengers. Great record. I dealt with the song, so naturally it was a great feeling. And it kind of felt like something I would want to do as an artist myself. There’s one I did with Chris Brown: "Crawl." Love that one. And the song I did with Tank off of his latest album, "This I How I Feel." It has a really good vibe.

So you are Grammy-nominated this year! I wanted to know, how does it honestly feel like to be nominated. Keep it real! Are you truly happy just to be recognized, or do you really just want to win?
I’m thrilled to be acknowledged, especially for this gift and this talent I’ve been working so hard on. To be acknowledged and be seen as a vocalist and performer, and to be in a category of Best Male R&B Performance, is awesome, and especially by the Grammy committee—that’s the height of our music business. It’s awesome.

And specifically for a song that the fans online have been referring to as a "panty-dropping" single! I read comments and the female fan base is just growing. They seem to really appreciate and adore your appreciation of women all-around.
Wow! I’ll definitely try to keep that going!

Tell us more about the album title Whispers in the Dark. It’s enigmatic enough to lead someone to think, "Well, what does he mean by that?" But also, it makes sense in that if you’re in the dark, you’re not trying to make a lot of sense—most likely—so, it can be interpreted quite a few ways.
Well, Whispers in the Dark is a line I used in a song I have on my official album, and the song is basically like, “Whispers in the dark tend to you call you where you are.” Put it like this: at night, I deal with my demons, whatever that is, good or bad, and it’s usually those voices you hear that make you recognize them; they’re calling you. I’m speaking from personal experience, but I feel like other people can relate to having those voices in your head and usually that happens when you’re alone, and that nighttime. That kind of vibe and of the unknown. You can’t see what’s there. [Laughs] Does that make sense?

Yeah, yeah it does! And I figured that, too. I just wanted to hear from you directly on and from the album’s perspective. I had my own idea?
And what was that?

Whispers in the Dark to me meant… just a very secretive moment whether with yourself or with someone, and you wouldn’t necessarily mind getting caught, either. And it doesn’t have to something physical that is happening. Just in the sense that someone just caught you; someone could potentially catch you.
Well, that’s exactly right! There are so many different ways of taking it. People always ask me about my music, “What do you want people to take from it?” It’s whatever makes them happy. Whatever feels good to them. As long as they take something.

That definitely leads to the next question, and it’s kind of a two-parter. I did see the video for "Make Love to Me," which I enjoyed and I peeped that Kelly Rowland cameo! But from watching it, I knew I wanted to ask you: do you consider yourself an old soul? While watching it, I was thinking, this is some Gerald Levert, Barry White, with a little bit of Marvin Gaye, and you kind of remind me of Prince, too.
I’ll take that!

And I thought of that because it’s not like today’s contemporary R&B where—and this is where the second part comes in—everyone seems to have an opinion on the state of R&B. Trey Songz said this; I interviewed Ne-Yo about it and he said it lacked soul; but when I was watching your video, you’re modern, but you also seemed to be harkening back to the greatness of traditional R&B, and I was just wondering about your thoughts on that. 
I pride myself on feeling. I can’t do it if I can’t feel it and I guess that exhibits through me. My thing is if I feel it, people can feel it. Also, I’m from New Orleans, and you’ll meet a lot of people of New Orleans, everybody from people we know like Lil Wayne to everyone else, that’s just the way people are raised. The way that city is, that part of town. It’s a very laid-back, soulful kind of place and I think naturally, that’s just how we are, I’m not the only one; it’s the upbringing. I’m surrounded by older people. I was just put on to a lot of things a lot of classic music early on and I guess it just came a part of me. That’s just how people are from New Orleans. And I also just really respect classic, great music of the past. They really laid out the foundation for actual feeling and in giving yourself completely without repercussions. It’s just saying, "I’m hurting." And people want to hear that.

And the state of R&B… I feel like you can’t judge art. Everybody has an interpretation. And this is a business. People got families to feed. So if you’re not buying the organic-feeling songs that everybody professes they want, but they’re not supporting it and want to freeload on, you can’t get mad at that person for switching to something sellable for the moment at least because it is a business. If you buy that kind of music, people will make what I like to call those personal songs. And when creating them, you’re taking a chance because not everybody’s going to play it, but in actuality, everybody cries. But I guess radio, and the labels, they aren’t willing to give it a chance. People haven’t been supporting that in the past. It takes a whole union of people to do it. One person can’t do it alone. One person can’t be speaking some knowledge and then other people are just trying to have a good time. Everybody has to be on the same, be promoting the same feeling. Let’s make music that you can feel and they will. Let’s say or teach somebody something. What’s going on? Let’s actually talk about what’s going on aside from the club. There’s life after the club.

Do you feel your music is more sexual, sensual, or atmospheric? How would you describe it?
It’s very emotional. Highs and lows. Ups and downs. I like "sensual." "Sexual" seems so physical. But I do think it’s a little bit of both. The mental, it’s soulful, and can be a physical thing. I would love for anyone listening to my music to start [feeling it] on the inside.

As for the songs on the mixtape, which ones were difficult to create? Or took a lot out of you emotionally?
The song "Oh God." I had that song, that composition from Danja. He had produced it. I had to live with it. When I first heard it, I had a structure, melody, and hook idea. But it just wasn’t happening for me and I had to put it back in the oven. Just wait for it to come to me. And one day I went back into the booth, and did it. It was tough.

And now a common question. What can we look forward to from you next year in 2013?
Oh, man! Hopefully a lot more Luke James! I am still working on the project [my debut LP]. Everyday, everyday. I’m learning something new, so I’m just going to keep recording until the official release date. Keep promoting myself and hopefully join this new movement of great music and new faces that are coming and just helping music transition to a more beautiful place where everyone is somewhat pleased. I’m also getting into acting and hopefully that will be something that will jump off.

TV or film first?
I would love to do film.

What are some of your favorite movies?
Mo’ Betta Blues. The Lost Boys. Purple Rain. Glory. I like different genres of movies. I like Manhattan by Woody Allen. I love his movies because they’re kind of cerebral. He’s almost like a contrast to Spike Lee, yet I find their films similar.

Both often based in New York City…
I like Spike Lee movies too. That’s where I’m at.

Is there a genre of music that you haven’t toyed with and experimented with yet and would like to? Because again, from the video and mixtape, I was thinking it was jarring to me—in a good way—how it sounded so different from stuff I hear today and it’s why I compared you to those legends. And I thought, "I wonder if he would ever do a song with David Guetta?"
With the music, I always want to take it to another level. Another foundation. It’s got to be like a dream. Where else can you take it? That’s how I want my music to feel. I like a vibe, and I don’t care if it takes seven minutes long to express it. It’s music. So, I don’t know… maybe alternative. I like to think of my music as classic R&B with the alternative and spiritual. I merge those things. Like Coldplay has a lot of soul. You can tell those boys went to church. Those songs just take you somewhere. Those chords, and how Chris [Martin] sings certain lines and what they say. And I just think my interpretation is all of that. I think everything I love you hear it in the music. And when the actual album comes out, you’ll hear more of where I want to go.

Last, last question! You touched on this earlier, but possibly explain more. What do you want your female fans—and male fans, too—to get from you?
One thing I want to say is that it’s OK to feel. We live in such a numb world, but it’s still a feeling because we know it’s numb. We fight it, but it’s OK to express your feelings and know what you want. Go for it. Life is too short to not fully live. I’m learning how to be in the moment and just say like, "Wow. I’m nominated for a Grammy. This is awesome." To really bask in it instead of being like, "OK. Nominated for a Grammy. What’s the next thing?" I’m trying to hold in on my feelings and become one with it. So, if I had anything to say to both the guys and the girls is that it’s OK to feel. It’s OK to rock side to side and say, "Oh my God, I love this." It’s OK to scream. At shows, people can be so uptight! And I move around a lot because I get so into my music. But also, I’m hoping I can help you guide your way out of that very thing you’ve been used to, to this new thing that is not really new. You expressed yourself when you were a child. You weren’t afraid to cry and express your feelings. Now that you’re older, we have this tough skin so we don’t show anyone we’ve got feelings. We’re human. And once people become more humanized, the world will be a better place, more full of love. If that makes any sense. Let’s make this fun again. Have fun, dammit!

All Chris Brown And Rihanna Do Is Tweet Pictures Of Each Other Now

Another day, another reminder from Chris Brown and Rihanna that they are fucking, just because everyone thinks that’s a TERRIBLE idea.

Brown posted a photo on Instagram of him with a cigarette dangling out of his mouth and Rihanna wearing lingerie, wrapped up in what looks like a camo-print blanket. 

Last week, Rihanna tweeted a photo of Breezy lying face down on a bed. Then Rihanna tweeted a picture of her straddling him from behind. 

Why he would be throwing it in everyone’s faces that the woman he beat the shit out of still loves him, I kinda understand. But what she’s getting out of it other than "Ugh, really?" attention, I still don’t know. 

Contact the author of this post at Jessica.Wakeman@Gmail.com. Follow me on Twitter.