FashionFeed: The Best ‘Best-Of’ Lists of 2011

● Fashionista’s roundup of top fashion editorials features that memorable Vogue spread with the ageless Natalia Vodianova cuddling with stylish wunderkinds Elle Fanning, Chloe Moretz, and Hailee Steinfeld. [Fashionista]

● Here’s a roundup of the 10 best pop-up stores of the year, which includes Nicola Formichetti’s spectacular concept store. [Racked NY]

● Derek Blasberg’s best-dress of 2011 features a mix of obvious choices (Alexa Chung, Kate Moss), but also includes some surprises, like breakout star Elizabeth Olsen. [Harper’s Bazaar]

● Cathy Horyn’s picks for notable moments in fashion range from the John Galliano debacle to Giovanna Battaglia’s gravity-defying Stephen Sprouse gown at the Cannes Film Festival. [NYT]

● Fashion Gone Rogue’s best beauty editorials include Anais Pouilot‘s striking braid game and Joudan Dunn’s intricate headwear in Vogue Paris.  [FGR]

● Some of this year’s top fashion magazine covers include a crying Hailee Steinfeld for LOVE and a provocatively positioned butterfly for Garage.  [Styleite]

 

‘Carrie’ Remake Gets Pushed Back for a Fall Release

Whether you’re a devout fan of Stephen King’s novel or Brian De Palma’s haunting 1976 film, the modern remastering of Carrie is sure to be anticipated. As Hollywood is wont to do, audiences are in store for a new spin on the cult classic of a shy high school outcast who taps into her newly discovered telekinetic powers to exact revenge on her bullying schoolmates. Helmed by Boys Don’t Cry director Kimberly Peirce, the film—which was previously set for a March release—has now been pushed back to next fall.

The October opening only makes sense, allowing the premiere to coincide with horror-mania leading up to Halloween, garnering a larger audience while building hype surrounding the project. For a girl of only fifteen, Chloe Mortez, who holds the titular role, has played some pretty fierce and diverse characters; so it will be interesting to see how she fares followng in Sissy Spacek’s iconic footsteps. With Julianne Moore and Judy Greer rounding out the cast, the talent is there, but in any case, it would be difficult to top the bloody gorgeous De Palma original.

Check out the new poster and official teaser for the film.

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Movies Opening This Weekend, in Order of How Much We Like Their Trailers

Some people judge a movie based on reviews, other will go see something just because it features a favorite actor. Here, we’re judging this weekend’s offerings based solely on what we see in the trailers and ranking them accordingly.

Hick: Chloe Moretz plays a runaway kid on her way to the bright lights of Vegas. On the way she meets a cast of ne’erdowells including Eddie Redmayne, Blake Lively and Juliette Lewis. It’s a story we’ve seen before, but this trailer is exciting enough that seeing it again doesn’t sound so bad.

A Bag of Hammers: This SXSW-approved indie comedy follows two con men who pose as valets as they steal their way into audience’s hearts. The introduction of a kid promises to schmaltz up the joint and might lead to a saccharine ending, but any trailer that uses The Cure so well is alright by us.

Dark Shadows: Tim Burton and Johnny Depp take on the beloved 1960s and ‘70s daytime creepfest with their signature Goth-lite touch and a cast featuring Michelle Pfeiffer and, as always, Helena Bonham Carter. The trailer doesn’t sell exactly the vampire movie we want to see, but it’s the one they’ve got.

Where Do We Go Now: A subtitled foreign number about women who are attempting to keep their village safe from a religious war and the men who can’t seem to help but start one. This won’t take care of your car-chases-and-explosions needs, but if you’re feeling brainy it could be satisfying.

Dragon Eyes: When a town plagued by drugs and gangs gets a new citizen in the form of martial arts master Ryan Hong… well, you know what happens. The fight scenes promise to be sickening, the rest will be boilerplate.

Girl in Progress: A coming of age story about a kid obsessed with coming of age stories and her immature mom. Eva Mendes had better be making this movie to pay off some sort of debt, because she should know better.

Is Johnny Depp Hollywood’s Sexiest Vampire?

The latest Tim Burton-Johnny Depp collaboration, Dark Shadows, won’t open until May 11, but today a featurette on the film hit the web, showing off some never-before-seen footage and giving us a glimpse into Collinwood, the mansion Depp’s movie family, and the characters played by a supporting cast that includes Michelle Pfeiffer, Chloe Moretz, Eva Green, and Jonny Lee Miller.

But despite the excitement another Burton-Depp collaboration — the pair’s eighth — brings, this isn’t the first time we’ve all been to the sexy vampire rodeo. Take a walk down memory lane with us, will you?

There’s, of course, Alexander Skarsgard’s Eric Northman on HBO’s True Blood, perhaps the hottest bloodsucker—sorry, Vampire Bill—to ever cower from the sun.

And naturally, we have Robert Pattinson’s Edward Cullen in the Twilight films, if you’re into that sort of thing. If not, he has enough brothers, sisters and fake vampire parents that one of them has got to get your blood boiling.

Whether it’s Tom Cruise or Brad Pitt who’s your favorite, it was impossible to walk out of Interview with the Vampire without hoping to end up with one of these fangers clamped onto your neck.

Wesley Snipes’ titular character in Blade might have only been half vampire, but he was all hunk.

Like your vampires more New Wave? Keifer Sutherland and company, in 1987’s The Lost Boys offer eternal evil and Wayfarers. It’s a winning combo.

He might not be the megastar he once was, but Colin Farrell’s flesh-eating neighbor from the recent Fright Night reboot can come over and borrow a cup of sugar from us any time.

Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, More in New Clips from ‘Dark Shadows’

Johnny Depp has been all over the movie news world for the past couple of weeks now, and his two upcoming, much-hyped starring roles in Dark Shadows and The Lone Ranger have a bit in common. They’re both film reboots of popular television programs the Baby Boomers watched as kids. They both involve Depp wearing dramatic makeup.

Instead of the gothic vampire soap opera of the 1960s, the 2012 Dark Shadows, which sports the usual triumvirate of Depp, director Tim Burton and fellow Burton muse Helena Bonham Carter, seems like a ghoulish comic romp served with a side of ’70s cheese. Depp assumes the iconic role of Barnabas Collins, the heartthrob-without-a-beating-heart who the late Jonathan Frid made popular in the original show; Bonham Carter plays Dr. Julia Hoffman, the Collins family’s live-in therapist called upon to deal with the family’s long-lost undead relative. Michelle Pfeiffer stars as Elizabeth Collins Stoddard, with Jonny Lee Miller (Dexter) playing Elizabeth’s brother and Chloe Moretz (Hugo) playing her daughter.

Nine new clips from the upcoming Dark Shadows were released this week, including We’re introduced to Elizabeth and Julia, who have a Bechdel test-defying discussion over whatever they shall do with Barnabas, as well as the Collins children, most notably Carolyn (Moretz), who advises Barnabas to book Alice Cooper for a "happening" at the house. There’s also a really creepy scene in which Barnabas asks Carolyn about why she’s 15 and doesn’t have a husband yet, but we digress.

Dark Shadows hits theaters May 11th, but you can check out some of the new clips after the jump.

Afternoon Links: ‘Ninja Turtles’ Gets A Name Change, ‘Harry Potter’ Goes Digital

● Looks like Michael Bay’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles will be neither "Teenage" nor "Mutant" — not by title, at least. Bay announced on his blog this morning that Paramount marketing has renamed his reboot Ninja Turtles. "They made the title simple. The characters you all remember are exactly the same," he assured, adding that, "yes they still act like teenagers." [EW]

● The precocious Chloe Moretz has been cast as the tormented adolescent lead in Kimberly Pierce’s upcoming Carrie remake. "I’ve never been so happy in my life," wrote Moretz on Twitter. [Deadline]

● The Harry Potter series is at last going digital, with all seven books now available for download from J.K. Rowling’s own Pottermore site. [WSJ]

● Lil B will give a #rare, #exclusive, and — although it goes without saying — #based lecture about something at NYU on April 11. "THIS WILL BE HISTORICAL AND TRULY LIFE CHANGING, HISTORY STARTS," says the Based God, and we don’t doubt it. [Pitchfork]

● 11 years, 6 million albums sold, and perhaps the best Pitchfork review of all time later, the Aussie rockers that make up Jet have decided to call it quits "to pursue separate creative endeavors." [Spinner]

● They might have lost Khloe Kardashian in the wake of the flour-bombing incident, but a new and beautiful relationship appears to be blooming between the increasingly absurdist PETA and "recently switched to a vegetarian" Courtney Stodden. Lets call it a draw. [NYDN/Gawker]

● Steven Tyler celebrated his 64th birthday with a sparkly blue pedicure, a new puka shell necklace, and a nice walk on the beach. [ONTD]

Roger Ebert on ‘Kick-Ass’: Critic or Scold?

“Shall I have feelings, or should I pretend to be cool?” asks Roger Ebert in the lede of his scathing review for Mathew Vaughn’s Kick-Ass, opening today. Obviously it’s a rhetorical question—the one being inevitable, the other not really befitting an established 67-year-old critic—but it casts a deliberately invidious judgment that’s not just directed at the film. Ebert here and elsewhere in the piece boldly insinuates that if you can appreciate Kick-Ass‘ rock-’em-sock-’em violence, you’re likely shallow, blinkered, and bereft of genuine human emotions.

He continues: “Will I seem hopelessly square if I find Kick-Ass morally reprehensible and will I appear to have missed the point?” I haven’t seen the film, but have seen countless clips and trailers, and think I can safely answer the question: yes and yes. The bug up Ebert’s butt, of course, is the violence dispensed here by adolescent crime-fighting wunderkind, Hit-Girl (Chloe Moretz), who terminates no end of villains in an incredibly violent manner. Moretz, who steals the movie I’m told, was eleven at the time of the shoot, and it’s her foul-mouthed, gun-toting antics that have become the film’s biggest talking point.

“This isn’t comic violence,” Ebert writes. “These men, and many others in the film, are really stone-cold dead. And the 11-year-old apparently experiences no emotions about this. Many children that age would be, I dunno, affected somehow, don’t you think, after killing eight or 12 men who were trying to kill her?” Is he joking? It’s one thing to disparage the trendy comic-book-ification of recent movies, and another altogether to say you don’t like a comedy because it isn’t a drama. And since when have superheroes of any age paused to consider the deeper meaning of a few dead henchmen?

Yes, it’s transgressive to have a young female character portrayed as a non-stop killing machine, but no more so than it is absurd, and therein lies the zest of the comedy. Ebert, immune to it, rather thinks the whole affair promotes youth violence. “When kids in the age range of this movie’s home video audience are shooting one another every day in America, that kind of stops being funny.” This is just embarrassing, the kind of narrow, fustian moralizing that leads people to things like editing the “objectionable” violence from Roadrunner cartoons. Kids have played at “war” and other such such violent diversions since time immemorial, and no motion picture that I know of ever handed out guns to children. Ebert’s qualms notwithstanding, I’m betting it’s possible to like Kick-Ass and not be an apathetic asshole.

Movie Reviews: Kick-Ass, I Love You Phillip Morris, The Greatest

I Love You Phillip Morris – “This really happened. It really did.” So read the subtitles at the beginning of I Love You Phillip Morris, informing the audience that the mind-boggling exploits of protagonist Steven Russell (Jim Carrey)—con man, embezzler, impersonator and frequent jail-breaker—are all true. But 15 minutes into the film, when the camera cuts away from Russell, a seemingly cheerful family man, dedicated Christian and potluck-frequenting police officer, to Russell euphorically sodomizing another man while chortling in voice-over, “I’m gay, gay, gay!” those subtitles take on new meaning. Forget the neutered “Will & Grace”. Forget the tortured Brokeback Mountain. This is a movie starring Hollywood heavies Carrey and Ewan McGregor (playing the love of Russell’s life, Phillip Morris) as unapologetic, unconflicted homosexuals who like to screw. This really happened. It really did. If neither Carrey nor the film is plausible in the more earnest moments, well, it’s the movie’s sexual politics, not its weaknesses, that will have everyone talking.—Willa Paskin

Kick-Ass – “How come nobody’s ever tried to be a superhero?” wonders Kick-Ass, and then spends two twisted and exhilarating hours answering: “Because it’s a bloody, dangerous, delusional occupation.” To break the monotony of high school mediocrity, Dave Lizewski (Aaron Johnson) turns to vigilantism, becoming the masked avenger of the film’s title. The problem is, Dave is Peter Parker without the IQ or the spider bite—the only ass getting kicked is his own. When Dave gets caught up in a war between some seriously skilled justice-seekers and a mob boss, we’re introduced to superheroes played by Nicolas Cage, Christopher Mintz-Plasse and, best of all, 12-year-old Chloe Moretz. As the pint-sized assassin Hit Girl, the foul-mouthed Moretz steals the movie from its lead and earns herself a spot in the superhero pantheon. The violence is visceral and real; the humor is R-rated. Needless to say, the movie kicks ass.—Ben Barna

The City of Your Final Destination – No one comes from a nuclear family anymore. The Gunds are no exception. Director James Ivory (Howard’s End, Le Divorce) follows aspiring biographer Omar (Omar Metwally) as he travels to a Uruguayan estancia to save his fledging academic career. Omar hopes to persuade the family of Jules Gund, a deceased and celebrated author, to give him permission to research the literary hero. The film follows the academic as he eases into the Gund family’s extraordinary, damaged lives. A talented cast—Laura Linney as the late writer’s wife, Charlotte Gainsbourg as his mistress and Anthony Hopkins as his brother—plays out a complex soap opera against an enchanting South American backdrop, rivaling the best Merchant- Ivory productions.—Eiseley Tauginas

The Thorn In The Heart – Michel Gondry’s latest, a documentary about his aunt Suzanne, a schoolteacher, never justifies its existence. Suzanne is a charming, lively, no-nonsense woman, but as Gondry takes her through places from her past, he never makes clear why hers is a story worth telling. The film’s meandering narrative torpedoes any chance of Suzanne’s mildly dramatic story appealing to a broader audience. Beautifully shot and gently dreamlike as it is, the movie is uncomfortably similar to a stranger’s home videos.—Michael Jordan

The Greatest – Like Ordinary People and Moonlight Mile before it, The Greatest is a small drama about a family coping with death. One irony of this particular genre is that it insists on the vast pain and messiness of grief, only to tidily resolve said grief before the closing credits. Pierce Brosnan and Susan Sarandon (who also starred in Moonlight) play the parents of an 18-year- old student (Aaron Johnson of Kick-Ass) who dies in a car accident shortly after losing his virginity to Rose (An Education’s lovely Carey Mulligan). A pregnant Rose arrives at the grief- stricken parents’ door, and, ultimately, healing ensues. The Greatest is memorable mostly due to Mulligan, Johnson and Johnny Simmons, who plays Johnson’s former burnout of a younger brother. Mulligan and Johnson, already two of Hollywood’s brightest rising stars, seem deservingly destined for long, impressive careers, but Simmons outshines them both. —W.P.