BlackBook 3 Minutes: Andy Cohen and Billy Eichner Part II

One afternoon in January, Andy Cohen, the grinning, gleeful, garrulous host of Bravo’s Watch What Happens Live sat down to chat with Billy Eichner, the grinning, gleeful, garrulous star of Funny or Die’s Billy on the Street. Eichner had been on Cohen’s show a few times, and Cohen—an avid booster of social media—is a keen follower of Eichner’s hilarious Twitter feed (sample: “Just remember – without Ringo Starr there would be no Beyoncé”) which has become essential reading during awards season. Cohen and Eichner, not surprisingly, have a lot in common—not only are they Jewish and gay and funny, they also enjoy Girls, love Fashion Queens, and adore Madonna. Well, what else did you expect?

If you missed Part 1, can you find it here.

BlackBook 3 Minutes: Andy Cohen and Billy Eichner Part I

One afternoon in January, Andy Cohen, the grinning, gleeful, garrulous host of Bravo’s Watch What Happens Live sat down to chat with Billy Eichner, the grinning, gleeful, garrulous star of Funny or Die’s Billy on the Street. Eichner had been on Cohen’s show a few times, and Cohen—an avid booster of social media—is a keen follower of Eichner’s hilarious Twitter feed (sample: “Just remember – without Ringo Starr there would be no Beyoncé”) which has become essential reading during awards season. Cohen and Eichner, not surprisingly, have a lot in common—not only are they Jewish and gay and funny, they also enjoy Girls, love Fashion Queens, and adore Madonna. Well, what else did you expect?

Billy Eichner Goes to Israel, Asks the Important Questions

There’s nothing I love more than Man on the Street reportage, probably because I’ve never been accosted by a Man on the Street reporter before. Still, there’s only one person who could raise the artform to a new level, and that man is Billy Eichner. Host of Funny or Die’s Billy on the Street, Eicher regularly jumps in front of unsuspecting strangers on the streets of New York with a barrage of trivia questions. The best part? Most of the answers to those questions are subjective, and nothing brings me more joy than when Eichner storms off in an angry huff when he doesn’t get the answer he wants. (i’ve taken to imitating him when the same thing happens to me at work!)

Occasionally, Eichner pops up on Conan as a correspondent, as he did this week when he asked some unsuspecting Isralis how they feel about stuff like Iran, nuclear missiles, and, most importantly, Madonna. Imagine a taller, angrier, gayer Triumph the Insult Comic Dog (but without the humping, I assume). Check out the hilarious clip below:


 

And here’s a bonus video, just for kicks, of Eichner challenging Rachel Dratch to name twenty white people. It’s hard, you guys!

Five Questions For Internet Week Honcho David-Michel Davies

How is Internet Week different from any other week, you might ask? Are you required to do more tweeting, Facebook stalking, online shopping, Grindring and illegal downloading? No, you are not.

Internet Week, which kicks off today, is a seven-day festival of panels, parties, workshops and Klout superstars that celebrates the way the web has influenced the culture and people of New York.

We sat down with festival co-chair David-Michel Davies to find out what Bjork, Bill Clinton and Instagram all have in common.

What exactly is Internet Week?
It’s a city-wide festival celebrating our industry’s thriving community. It’s a fun and interesting model for a festival in that it really mirrors the way the Internet works. Instead of us sitting in a room and coming up with events, we work closely with New York’s Internet community to program the festival, which means there are more than 200 events that are thrown by all sorts of different organizations under the festival’s umbrella. Those range from panels and conferences to arts events and parties. We also have a 50,000-square-foot headquarters at 82 Mercer Street. It’s relevant to what’s happening on the Internet today because the content is created by the city itself.

What events are you most looking forward to?
I’m excited to see the New York City photo exhibit at the W Times Square. It’s New York’s most talented Instagram photographers taking photos of the city and shown in a gallery there. There’s another exhibit at a Soho gallery called The Art of Apps, where people like Peter Rojas will have an exhibit of art interfaced with iPhone and iPad by some of the world’s top designers. And we’re having a panel at the headquarters with comedian Billy Eichner and others talking about comedy on the Internet.

And you also produce the Webby Awards, right?
We do produce the Webby Awards, which will be on May 21 at the Hammerstein Ballroom and will be hosted by Patton Oswalt, so it’ll be super funny. Even if you can’t come to the show, it’s live streamed at webbyawards.com at 5:30 EST and anyone can tune in. We’ll be honoring Louis C.K., we’ll be honoring Bjork, we’ll have a special tribute to Steve Jobs that we’ve been working on which will feature video message from President Clinton, Al Gore, Jimmy Fallon and more.

Do you see Internet Week as helping the pale, sweats-clad people of the web overcome the stereotype of being socially awkward loners?
The thing about it is that the web is really the hub of pop culture today. When I was younger it was television, that was the media that drove conversation. Today that’s the internet. We see all sorts of type of culture emerging online and Internet Week is a way of seeing that and bringing it to life in real space. Absolutely it’s a way to see people outside of behind the screens, but it’s also mirroring how vital the Internet is to the world.

Celebrate Oscar Weekend With a Retrospective of Hilarious Acceptance Speeches

Sally Field. Roberto Benigni. Marlon Brando (by way of Sacheen Littlefeather). There have been over eighty years of memorable Oscar acceptance speeches — some heartfelt, some batshit crazy. With this weekend’s ceremonies just around the corner (and a fair amount of speeches to be delivered in broken English by The Artist‘s creative team), what better way to celebrate so many decades of Oscar memories by hearing some of the greatest speeches performed live on stage? That’s why Rachel Shukert (author of Everything Is Going to Be Great!) and Michael Schulman (of The New Yorker) created You Like Me: An Evening of Classic Acceptance Speeches, running on Oscars Eve at Ars Nova in New York City.

Featuring the likes of Village Voice columnist Michael Musto, comedian and author Julie Klausner, and This American Life contributor and Thurber Prize winner David Rakoff, as well as several other New York-based performers and comedians, You Like Me celebrates the most entertaining part of the Academy Awards: the ego-fueled ridiculata so severely (and deliciously) on display. 

Check out some of You Like Me‘s previous installments below, including Shukert as Roberto Benigni, Klausner as Patti LuPone, Billy Eichner as Elaine Stritch, and Emily McNamara as Angelina Jolie:

You Like Me: An Evening of Classic Acceptance Speeches takes place at 8pm at Ars Nova, 511 West 54th Street. Tickets are $15 and are available here