Alexa Chung is the It-est It Girl

Photo: Joe Schildhorn/BFAnyc.com

Being an It Girl takes a lot of work. There’s traveling, partying, wearing gifted clothing, and mass attempts on being downright fabulous. It would be hard being Alexa Chung, said no one, nowhere. The British beauty air kisses Karl Lagerfeld’s cheeks regularly and sits front row at nearly every major fashion show.

She’s a chain-smoker and author of a book simply titled “It”. I think that needs no explaining as to why. Alexa is trotting behind personal favorite Chloe Sevigny on becoming the end all be all It Girl. See why, below.

1. When Alexa was a Versace. BFA_4795_548202Photo: Billy Farrell/BFAnyc.com

2. One of the multiple times Alexa DJed for Chanel. CHANEL Numéros Privés Opening Night Party and DinnerPhoto: David X Prutting/BFAnyc.com

3. She’s basically Anne’s BFF. Joe-Schildhorn-3Photo: Joe Schildhorn/BFAnyc.com

4. Cozying up to The LSD in hopes of snagging some free Moda Operandi (we would too). Neil-RasmusPhoto: Neil Rasmus/BFAnyc.com

5. Only an It Girl can get away with those shoes. CHANEL SS15 Runway ShowPhoto: Joe Schildhorn/BFAnyc.com

6. Only an It Girl can be a cheeseburger and not eat carbs at the same damn time. THE BYRNE NOTICE & EMERSON Host A Sick Halloween PartyPhoto: Matteo Prandoni/BFAnyc.com

7. When she cozies up to other It Girls Poppy and Joan just to solidify that she’s the Itest of them all. Solid & Striped x Poppy Delevingne Launch Dinner - Exclusive ContentPhoto: David X Prutting/BFAnyc.com

8. It Girls get giant bottles of nail polish. They’re the only people to get them. ALEXA CHUNG / NAILS INC. Personal Appearance at SEPHORAPhoto: Aria Isadora/BFAnyc.com

9. If you’re an It Girl you can push Tommy and get away with it. TOMMY HILFIGER Spring 2015 Womens CollectionPhoto: Matteo Prandoni/BFAnyc.com

10. And finally, signing “It,” her book. Aria-Isadora-2Photo: Aria Isadora/BFAnyc.com

Anne Hathaway and Alan Cumming Are Headed for a Broadway Revival of ‘Cabaret’

Oh, no. No. No. According to the Daily Mail, Anne Hathaway is reported to star in the upcoming Broadway revival of Cabaret alongside Alan Cumming. She will be taking on the lead role of Sally Bowles opposite Cumming’s Emcee and for the love of all things sacred, I cannot get behind this. Back in 1998, Cumming performed his Tony Award-winning run as the Emcee alongside Natasha Richardson in what was the closest thing to perfection that the musical can possibly get—save Liza Minnelli and Joel Grey of course. 

The 1930s Berlin set psychosexual political drama of a musical, made famous by Bob Fosse’s 1972 cinematic adaptation, is the epitome of everything I love in a musical, movie, or maybe just life. Haunting and shimmering, Minnelli spoke about the film back in January, joking that before it went into production they had no idea how to sell it, saying—"How are we going to advertise this? The Nifty Nazi Follies?’ Seth Cagin once wrote that Cabaret was the only major film of the period to "consider the flip side of political awareness, detailing the allure of decadence and self-indulgence, and the abegnation of social and political responsibility in the face of looming catastrophe a denial which nonetheless becomes an upbeat philosophy in the film’s crowning metaphor: Life is a cabaret!" 

But what I’m trying to get at here is: it’s not like Anne Hathaway can’t be seductive, it’s not that she can’t go dark, it’s not that she isn’t immensely talented or have an Oscar-winning voice—and I mean, this is just a musical after all—but she’s not a Sally Bowles. A Velma Kelly? Perhaps. A Roxie Hart? Bleach that pixie cut and maybe? But Sally, no. And although last fall she did perform numbers from Cabaret at Joe’s Pub to a warm reception, that’s all fine and dandy, but a Broadway turn in the iconic role it does not make.

Well fine, I can get past this just knowing that Cumming will be hitting the stage again in his greatest role as the devilish Emcee, that’s thrilling enough in itself. So, for now, let’s just watch some videos of him performing in the late ’90s. Enjoy.

Also, watch HERE and HERE.

 

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You Probably Hate Anne Hathaway Because of the Economy

While everyone is fawning all over Jennifer Lawrence this week (well, everyone but me), it appears that the public opinion of Anne Hathaway has slipped even lower than before, with her supposed perfection inducing riotous masses of women to rampage fashion houses that manufacture nipply couture gowns and public burnings of Les Misérables special-edition Blu-rays. Well, it’s not that bad, but I’m thinking we’re getting close to it. But maybe you’re like me and don’t understand the hatred of Anne Hathaway—she is, after all, just as annoying as any other celebrity (J-Law included). Perhaps there’s a psychological reason behind all of this?

Salon’s Daniel D’Addario takes a look at what makes Hathaway so polarizing, and learns that it might be our problem, not hers.

[I]t may, indeed, be Hathaway’s face that fuels her haters, if only subconsciously: “When times are good we prefer actresses with rounder faces,” says psychology professor Terry Pettijohn, who has conducted academic studies on actress preference. “They convey these ideas of fun and youth.” Hathaway, on the other hand, has a “mature face” made distinctive by its slender shape and bone structure: “It suggests she would be popular when times are more challenging.” As the economy improves, Hathaway—whose peak of fame, post-boyfriend, pre-Oscar-hosting, came amid the 2008 economic crash—may just be a reminder of bad times.

More likely, though, Hathaway is just the latest iteration of a long-held tradition: the star we love to loathe. And, indeed, Hollywood historian Ed Sikov says that this could be a path out for her: “There are two ways to win over the public: You can make the public love you, or you can make the public hate you. Maybe it’s better to say, ‘You can make the public love to hate you. Take Bette Davis.’” The “All About Eve” star was willing to make herself look mean or aggressive, and had a career that lasted decades.

“She wasn’t afraid to be hated, and audiences respected her for that.”

See, guys? You don’t really hate Anne Hathaway, you hate the recession! And also yourselves. I suggest we all go watch All About Eve. Why not? That movie is awesome! It might not help you with your Hathaway hatred (or me with my disdain for Jennifer Lawrence’s irreverent charm), but it’ll probably distract us for a couple of hours. 

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NYT Writer Surprised Actresses Sometimes Act Like Actual People

Man, the Oscars really brought out the worst in people last night, huh? In addition to all your amateur comedian friends trying to outsnark each other while live-tweeting the thing, some dudes who actually contributed to the making of a really good movie got played off by the “Jaws” theme music while the cast of Chicago got to go up there like five times. There was Seth MacFarlane’s entire hosting gig, which played like the open-mic comedy set of a frat boy who finds himself saying “it’s okay, some of my best friends are…” a lot. Someone who should never be allowed near a computer or smartphone again made a @HathawaysNipple novelty Twitter account because we are the worst generation and let this happen. Really a race to the bottom last night, everyone.

But Alessandra Stanley at The New York Times (On It!) had a much different take on the evening. She rather enjoyed MacFarlane as the host, or, at least, didn’t see him as the core problem. She saves quite a bit of her ire for a perhaps undeserving target, Best Actress winner Jennifer Lawrence, for doing human things that most people do literally every day. She writes:

“Ms. Lawrence tripped on her way to the stage but didn’t make any faux pas in her acceptance speech. She was less guarded on the red carpet, complaining to one interviewer that she was hungry and moaning presciently that the show is too long. With another, she let fly a profanity that ABC barely bleeped in time.

It wasn’t the first time she’s flouted awards-show etiquette: At the Golden Globes, she began her acceptance speech by dissing Meryl Streep. (Mr. MacFarlane referred to the gaffe in a joke, saying that he heard Ms. Lawrence say that win or lose, “it’s just an honor that Meryl Streep wasn’t nominated.”) It could be a rebellious streak in her, but mostly it’s a reminder of how young and unworldly some stars are, despite all the coaching, minders and Dior gowns.”

So first of all, we’re all on the same page on this and I don’t even need to go into about how there’s no way Stanley would have written those same words, or dedicate that much space and indignation to Lawrence if she were a dude, right? Right. And you’d think with the high standards of quality the NYT tries to hold itself to or whatever, she would have at least run a Google search and seen the literally dozens of nearly identical blog posts about how Lawrence’s “I beat Meryl!” line was a First Wives Club reference and not in any way an actual slight at Meryl herself. It’s not that hard, guys. 

The Oscars have kind of developed this presence where they’re really just an expensive, self-congratulatory mess, especially in the last few years, where a Best Picture win for Crash and Billy Crystal in blackface can somehow coexist amid glittery montages celebrating how great and envelope-pushing the movies are. And you know what? If Jennifer Lawrence can see through the pageantry and keep it real, then more power to her. She looked great and she won a damn Oscar and made a lot of really GIF-able side-eyes. God forbid lady actors sometimes swear or trip or are honest about wanting to eat food.  

These actions don’t make Jennifer Lawrence “unworldly,” they make her a person. And this may be getting off-message a bit, but I know as a culture we don’t like to think celebrities are real people, but they are, and losing that reminder that they’re human is what leads to dumb Rihanna domestic violence jokes and snark about the Kardashians’ body hair and comments about stars’ weight that young, impressionable tweens see and think about their own bodies with that same scrutiny. And you know what? The show was way too damn long. Jennifer Lawrence was right.

So, to recap, Stanley just chastised an actress for expressing a desire to eat on the red carpet but sort of praised a dude who made a really tasteless eating disorder joke while hosting. Great job, everyone! You’re all the worst.

Trolling the Oscars: Why None of These Movies Deserve to Win Best Picture

Welcome to the internet, where all of my opinions are right. You know what’s so great about being able to log into a CMS account and self-publish my thoughts and ideas? No matter how I actually feel, everything I write online comes across as completely sincere and competent, even when the things I write are neither of those things! It’s a brave new world we’re living in, when tweets can be art and art can be criticized by any person with an idea for a clever hashtag. Naturally, it’s time to harness this power by showing you exactly why none of the nine nominees for Best Picture deserve to win a goddamn thing. Let’s go!

Amour

Oh, come on. You didn’t see Amour. You know how I know this? Because I didn’t see Amour. I didn’t see this movie because I could just call my grandparents and ask them to speak to me in French for two hours. At least the phone call would be free! And hey, maybe I’d get twenty bucks out of it or somewhere, whereas Amour would cost me at least thirteen dollars and bring with it a lot of emotional anxiety. Anyway, this movie should not win, but I kind of wish it would if only so I can quickly take screenshots of midwestern teenagers tweeting about how they don’t know what Amour is. That’s how blogging works!

Argo

Ugh, Argo. Argofuckyourself, indeed, Argo! The major point about Argo was that Ben Affleck can direct a movie, which comes as a surprise to literally no one because he has already directed two movies that people liked a lot. The other reason Argo was made was so Ben Affleck could take off his shirt in another movie. Oh, and you know another thing that sucked about Argo? The fact that none of the women in Argo were allowed to speak to each other on camera. Sorry, Clea Duvall; you get to be in a Big Motion Picture, but you may only open your mouth when in the presence of Victor Garber. And don’t you dare make eye contact with Ben Affleck! 

Beasts of the Southern Wild

I do love a movie with a precocious child as much as the next guy, but how awkward do you feel about the fact that some white people from New York City went down to New Orleans to make a movie about magical negroes? I’m surprised there weren’t any animated bears and foxes floating along the river, or that those giant titular beasts didn’t burst into "Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah." 

Django Unchained

This one is simple: Django Unchained should not win Best Picture because it is not Jackie Brown and Jackie Brown is the only Quentin Tarantino movie that deserves to win Best Picture. 

Les Misérables

A friend of mine described this movie with the following: "It was like in acting classes when one person started crying and then everyone else in class cried harder and louder and uglier." This is one of the few movies in which everyone was dead at the end and I thought, "You know what? I’m OK with this." That is until the ghost of Anne Hathaway showed up again with that chopped-off hair and sad dress, which made me depressed. I really hate that it’s a known fact that your apperance when you die is what you’ll look like in Heaven. Really sucks for people who get run over by trucks, huh? 

Life of Pi

Spoiler alert: Pi is the tiger, and the tiger is Pi, and the eggman is Paul, I think, and maybe we ought to remake Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band but with 3D CGI, but I’m getting distracted. Life of Pi is a cartoon movie for adults who are still making their way through Oprah’s Book Club.

Lincoln

Oh, I’m sorry, is this category called Best Way to Nap? Lincoln was terrible. Remember how fun TV miniseries used to be? They were long, yes, but they were campy as hell, had a lot of awkward sex not normally seen during primetime, and were stuffed with lots of recognizable people who were not really famous but still possessed a certain level celebrity that you’d still be excited if you saw them on the street. Lincoln was just a really expensive TV-miniseries, but without the sex. Or the fun. And with overwritten dialogue by Tony Kushner. I got a screener of Lincoln, and it’s best uses so far have been as a coaster and as a substitute for Ambien.

Silver Linings Playbook

I can’t for the life of me figure out why people love this movie so much. Is it because we’re so desperate to see Ben Stiller act in a dramatic performance that we could substitute in Bradley Cooper and just go with it? Is it because it’s nice to see Julia Stiles back in action? Is it because of Jacki Weaver saying "crabby snacks and homemades?" Is it because of Dancing With the Stars? Is it because As Good as It Gets was too subtle and we needed a subpar version of that to really hone in the idea of what mental illness is? Or is it because everyone is crazy? If everyone is crazy, no one is crazy. 

Zero Dark Thirty

JUST KIDDING! While you were all being emotionally waterboarded by the rest of what Hollywood had to offer, you guys completely missed the fact that this was the best movie of the year. Jessica Chastain! She could act circles around everyone else on this planet, and she wouldn’t be exhausted because she’s, like, a healthy vegan. And you know she’s on track for world domination. GET IT TOGETHER, PEOPLE. it doesn’t even matter if this loses to, say, Argo, because Kathryn Bigelow will have her revenge on all of you. Especially you, Ben Affleck. 

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Manolo Blahnik Says Today’s Actresses Are ‘All the Same’

We know who won’t be wearing Manolo Blahnik heels at this Sunday’s 85th Academy Awards. In a recent Q&A for the March issue of Interview, the iconic footwear purveyor quips that the starlets of today are difficult to disinguish. " I don’t even know Amanda Seyfried or whatever—they’re all the same! I try to remember—the only one I remember is Julia Roberts because she’s particular. Anne Hathaway… Pretty? Yes. Wonderful actress? Yes. But, I mean, I don’t even remember her. What is it about her?" Ouch.

Blahnik goes on to say that Hathaway was really good as Cat Woman in The Dark Night Rises but he just doesn’t remember her. So, who are the stars that Manolo does like? "I almost fainted on that girl, the tiny woman from France, no, from Mexico… Salma Hayek," he tells Tim Blanks. "But she’s a sweet girl, beautiful. I love that. This is what I really love: Where are those girls? I was looking the other day, Lara Flynn Boyle in Twin Peaks and that other girl Sherilyn Fenn—they’re old-school girls like Elizabeth Taylor, and I think that’s so fabulous." Peep the complete interview here

Anne Hathaway’s Likability Keeps Slipping

Oh, Anne Hathaway. I really liked Anne Hathaway. People disagreed with me, and I would say, "No, no, she is excellent! She’s a good actress and she seems like a normal human." And then Les Misérables happened, and she started getting awards—all of the awards—and then I was like, "Hmm, Anne Hathaway? Maybe try not to seem like an asshole? Like, don’t say ‘blerg’ when you receive a Golden Globe because we all know you knew you were going to win?" Then she kept coming to other award shows and being like, "I AM ANNE HATHAWAY!" with her face and all, and man, it really got exhausting. So then last night she went on The Tonight Show and lamented that her fans booed her at the BAFTA awards because she was rushing through the red carpet but it wasn’t her fault because her dress broke and then she had to get a new one and be sewn into it and it’s all like, hey, Anne Hathaway, just stop talking, you are only making people not like you more. I’m looking out for you, but we’re on reeeeeally thin ice right now, OK?

[via Us Weekly]

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Check Out the New Oscar Edition of ‘Between Two Ferns’

Zach Galifianaskis’ Between Two Ferns, his Funny or Die faux talk show has had it’s fare share of hilarious celebrity moments. And returning from some time out of the spotlight, the abrasive, bearded Galifianaskis comes back to bring some laughs to this year’s award season. Featuring Oscar nominees Jennifer Lawrence, Naomi Watts, Anne Hathaway, Chrsitph Waltz, and Amy Adams, check out enjoyably awkward first installment of two features.

‘Argo’ Wins BAFTA for Best Picture, Best Director

While you were watching the Grammys, the BAFTAs, the U.K. version of the Oscars, was aired on BBC America. And hoo boy, what a mess of an awards show. I didn’t watch it, so I can only imagine the British humour happening all over the place, but I can tell you that I’ve got a pretty stiff upper lip this morning as I look at the list of winners. Argo won Best Picture and Best Director. Ben Affleck. The best director. Of the year! Ben Affleck is a better director than Quentin Tarantino, Kathryn Bigelow, et al. None of those chumps can possibly live up to the magnificent director Ben Affleck. Also, both Jennifer Lawrence and Jessica Chastain lost out to Emmanuelle Riva for Amour. Christolph Waltz won for Django Unchained, and Daniel Day-Lewis surprised no one when he won another award for Lincoln. And, of course, little Annie Hathaway likely annoyed people in England, too, with her insincerity upon winning Best Supporting Actress.

The full list of winners below, via EW.

Best Film: Argo
Best Director: Ben Affleck, Argo
Best Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln
Best Actress: Emmanuelle Riva, Amour
Best Supporting Actor: Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained
Best Supporting Actress: Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables
Best Original Screenplay: Django Unchained
Best Adapted Screenplay: Silver Linings Playbook
Best British Film: Skyfall
Best Film Not in the English Language: Amour
Best Animated Film: Brave
Best Documentary: Searching for Sugar Man
Best Editing: William Goldenberg, Argo
Best Costume Design: Jacqueline Durran, Anna Karenina
Best Cinematography: Claudio Miranda, Life of Pi
Best Original Music: Thomas Newman, Skyfall
Best Make-Up & Hair: Lisa Wescott, Les Misérables
Best Visual Effects: Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer, Donald R. Elliott, Life of Pi
Best Production Design: Eve Stewart, Anna Lynch-Robinson, Les Misérables
Best Sound: Simon Hayes, Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson, Jonathan Allen, Lee Walpole, John Warhurst, Les Misérables
Best British Debut: Bart Layton and Dimitri Doganis, The Imposter
Orange Rising Star Award: Juno Temple
Best Animated Short: The Making of Longbird
Best Live-Action Short: Swimmer

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