The Best Films to Watch Without Leaving Bed This Week: Stunning Sci-Fi Classics

World on a Wire, Sci-Fi, Film

Every Monday I find myself whispering that old Beckett adage into the morning air: I can’t go on / I’ll go on. As I settle into the week’s work, and no matter how thrilling the day’s prospects, it’s that beginning of the week existential stomach ache that always seemed to start gnawing away at my insides. But breathe, just breathe, the hours will pass themselves and soon it will all be easier and the weekend will come again—one that’s rife with fantastic films playing in theaters all around the city. But in the meantime, look forward to the evening, when a wealth of wonderful films will be at your fingertips.

With so many great movies streaming online, what better way to spend a cold March night than curled up beneath the sheets with some of the best rare and incredible cinema from the comfort of home? But with myriad options streaming, I understand the decision of what to screen in your private bedroom viewing can prove a challenge. So to make your troubles easier, this week we’ve highlighted some of our favorite science fiction movies to watch without leaving bed. From confounding classics like Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s World on a Wire to modern wonders such as Shane Carruth’s Upstream Color, get cozy and enjoy.

WORLD ON A WIRE, Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Available to watch on Hulu +

SOLARIS, Andrei Tarkovsky

Available to watch on Hulu +

LA JETEE, Chris Marker

Available to watch on Hulu +

VIDEODROME, David Cronenberg

Available to watch on Amazon / iTunes

THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH, Nicolas Roeg

Available to watch on Amazon / iTunes

UPSTREAM COLOR, Shane Carruth

Available to watch on Netflix / iTunes

BEYOND THE BLACK RAINBOW, Panos Cosmatos

Available to watch on Netflix / iTunes

BRAZIL, Terry Gilliam

Available to watch on Amazon

ERASERHEAD, David Lynch

Available to watch on Hulu +

METROPOLIS, Fritz Lang

Available to watch on Netflix / iTunes

THE ELEMENT OF CRIME, Lars von Trier

Available to watch on Hulu +

BLACK MOON, Louis Malle

Available to watch on Hulu +

ALPHAVILLE, Jean-Luc Godard

Available to watch on iTunes / Amazon

Enjoy Footage From On the Set of Tarkovsky’s ‘Andrei Rublev’

Shot over the course of September of 1964 to August of 1966, Andrei Tarkovsky’s Andrei Rublev tells the story of an “otherworldly hero” who “wanders across a landscape of forlorn splendor—observing suffering peasants, hallucinating the scriptures, working for brutal nobles until, having killed a man in the sack of Vladimir, he takes a vow of silence and gives up painting.” Shot with an exacting beauty, like much of Tarkovsky’s work, the film evokes a strong feeling of touch and place—a “film of the earth” as he called it. And today we have a look behind-the-scenes, on set with the cinematic genius on gorgeously worn-out color.

Speaking to the film, J. Hoberman wrote:

On the other hand, the film projects an entire world—or rather the sense that, as predicted by André Bazin’s “Myth of Total Cinema,” the world itself is trying to force its way through the screen. Undirectable creatures animate Tarkovsky’s compositions—a cat bounds across a corpse-strewn church, wild geese flutter over a savaged city. The birch woods are alive with water snakes and crawling ants, the forest floor yields a decomposing swan. The soundtrack is filled with bird calls and wordless singing; there’s always a fire’s crackle or a tolling bell in the background. 
 
Andrei Rublev is itself more an icon than a movie about an icon painter. (Perhaps it should be seen as a “moving icon,” in the same sense that the Lumière brothers made “moving pictures.”) This is a portrait of an artist in which no one lifts a brush. The patterns are God’s, a close-up of spilled paint swirling into pond water or the clods of dirt Rublev flings against a whitewashed wall. But no movie has ever attached greater significance to the artist’s role. It’s as though Rublev’s presence justifies creation.
And although the clip below onto features Tarkovsky speaking at the beginning of the clip, the rest of the footage is set to Dmitri Shostakovich’s "Symphony No. 5 in D minor, Op. 47." So really you have no excuse not to spend the next five minutes watching this. Enjoy.