Shop the Vibrant and Iconic Lifestyles of Your Favorite ’80s Movie Starlets

Travel back in time and shop the trendsetting and iconic lifestyles of your favorite 1980s women on screen with help from our ebay collection.

Get Nastassja Kinski’s subtly sexy look from Paris, Texas with an deep pink oversized Angora sweater and tousled, voluminous locks. Go retro with a red rotary phone and Super 8mm camera to immerse yourself in the past.
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Take inspiration from Madonna’s trailblazing accessories style in Desperately Seeking Susan with chunky gold Christian Lacroix, Valentino, and Chanel jewelry paired with classic Wayfarers. Get really into the groove throw your favorite vintage Madonna on the record player.
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Spice up your summer look with inspiration from Melanie Griffith in Something Wild by donning a simple black Alexander Wang dress with vintage statement jewelry and colorful handmade African Bead Work bangles. Give your best shade with vintage square sunglasses in an array of eye-popping colors.
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Be ready for any occasion with Rosanna Arquette’s sweet and simply chic style from After Hours and dress yourself in a Marc Jacobs silk skirt and a Ferragamo buckle belt. Who needs a phone, when you’ve got a classic vintage pocket watch to help you beat the clock.

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Uncovering The Secrets Behind Broadway’s Bad Boy Hit ‘Rock of Ages’

Every rose has its thorn, every town has its rebel, and when it comes to the Great White Way, Rock of Ages is it. Flanked with a panties-covered set, a cast with amazingly toned abs, and a score full of the best ‘80s songs, this powerhouse Broadway musical defies the conventional stay-in-your-seat theatergoing experience, and transforms it into a sex-soaked rock concert that melds sincerity with parody; beer and shots are proffered in the aisles, rock posters dress the walls, and audience revelry is encouraged and inevitable. This bad boy breaks the rules, and it’s working; in its fourth year, Rock of Ages is selling better than ever. This month, it served its one-millionth customer, and has consistently been one of Broadway’s top 10 most-attended shows this year.

Of course, there are questions: How? Why? What is its mystical secret?

I sat down with two stars of the show to try to unlock these very questions: Jeremy Woodard – who plays Stacee Jaxx, the near-washed up, wild rock star – and Justin Matthew Sargent, who plays Drew, the aspiring rock star.

Apart from the music, what do you think people love about this show?
Jeremy Woodard: There’s something nostalgic about the ‘80s. Seeing as the economy is where it’s at, this show lets you just kick back and enjoy. There’s no drama – everything is said in jest. And when things are bad out there, you need to laugh a lot.
Justin Matthew Sargent: The story, too. It’s not your usual rags-to-riches tale. The characters start with a dream, until they realize the reality of it and that it’s not the kind of life they want to lead. They reevaluate and find new dreams in it all.
JW: The show doesn’t take itself too seriously. At all.

Unlike other jukebox musicals that stick to just one band’s music, Rock of Ages features the songs from a bunch of different ‘80s artists – Poison, Twisted Sister, Journey –  attracting all the fans that come with them. That’s a pretty brilliant, commercial concept.
JMS: Oh, totally.The fans go nuts for this show. It’s all built-in. And even though it’s ‘80s rock music and a niche kind of thing, you have a lot of versatility – you’ve got your power ballads, your songs that kick ass, sweet songs like “Every Rose Has Its Thorn.” There are so many different genres that make up ‘80s rock. And the coolest thing is when the people from those bands come to see the show.

What rock stars have been in the audience?
JMS: We’ve had Journey come to see the show, Phil Collins. We had Dee Snider in the show for a little while, and he’s just the nicest. I was such a big fan of his before we worked with him, and still am.

Jeremy, since you play Stacee Jaxx, the magnetic, women-obsessed rocker, do you receive any crazy emails, dirty underwear, etc. from fans?
JW: Thankfully, no dirty underwear. When I had Facebook, I used to get crazy messages that crossed the line, so I bowed out. There hasn’t been anyone that’s been scary. We sometimes get weird letters, but the girls get stuff more than we do.
JMS: Fans make us food all the time though – lots of cookies. They’ve also made real dolls out of us.
JW: Early on, our original Stacee – James Carpinello – had a lady come out and ask him to sign her shoulder as Stacee Jaxx, and then she got it tattooed afterward. She still comes around every now and then. That’s the craziest thing I’ve ever seen.

What a souvenir. I’ve heard there are fans that have seen this show over 250 times.
JW: Oh yeah. I ask people sometimes how they can afford to see it that often. I like Krispy Kreme, but I don’t think I can eat that many donuts.

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American Apparel Cleans Up Its Act

The 80s are officially done, or at least over at the spandex loving house of American Apparel. Discotheque Confession has called out a shift in style at the international retailer that she picked up on thanks to a friend currently employed by Dov Charney’s monolith. “Sophie explained that the brand has banished all 80s lame from the stores… in favour of a more 90s preppy look,” the post reads. Apparently the new, slightly more modern push, is part of a whole ‘new look’ American Apparel is looking to brand as the epitome of cool. So, toss out your wet look leggings and shoulder pads, nerdtastic 90s gear is now edging its way into prominence as hipsters’ garb of choice.

Deemed ‘The New Standards,’ American Apparel is honing its gaze on basics of an all new variety. Not only do the styles echo what’s being done at brands like Steven Alan or the more corporate J. Crew, so does the lingo–‘classic cuts’ and ‘standards’ reeks of the same heritage adoring language brands from Louis Vuitton to GAP have been spouting for seasons. The good news: this means a move away from throwaway fast fashion and disposable trends and more of an emphasis on investing in classic styles. (Mother Earth thanks you, Dov.)

Discotheque Confessions also raises the interesting point of American Apparel’s seemingly higher price tags these days. “£42 for chambray pocket shorts? Or £52 for simple button up shirts? I still scratch my head in wonderment; is this really the price of clothes that have been ethically produced or are they slapping on a heftier value?” Surely manufacturing locally in Los Angeles as opposed to China doesn’t save much by way of expenses for American Apparel. But, considering the company has been facing some financial troubles for the past few months, harder to stomach price points are likely less about production methods and more about Charney’s brainchild looking to reinvigorate emaciated profits.