Dental Hygiene Under Quarantine: Is Linhart the Couture of Oral Care?

 

 

 

Of course we’re all indoors these days, FaceTiming or Skyping with our friends and colleagues. Sure, you can add an exotic beachy destination or far off landscape to your background, dress professionally (whatever that means anymore) from the waist up, and take Tom Ford’s recent tips for putting your best Zoom face forward. But what about your teeth? Yup, those pearly whites just waiting for their influencer moment.

Here enters LINHART, with it’s signature orange and black packaging, often referenced as “the Hermes of Oral Care.” We were sold on sight. But not only is the unexpectedly modern design a style-must in any medicine cabinet worth its shelf; this ultra high performing line of oral care products promises to usher you towards the kind of knockout smile that is sure to up your video conference game.

Intrigued, we (remotely of course) caught up with the father and son, New York City-based dental team Drs. Zachary and Jan Linhart to get the lowdown during lockdown here on the latest in maintaining your chompers for the duration and beyond. They also shared some at-home oral hygiene pointers until we’re all able to be back in the dentist’s chair (sigh).

 

What motivated you to create your own oral care line?

Zachary Linhart: After seeing patient after patient with enamel loss caused by other whitening toothpaste, my father and I spent ten years in research and product development to find a better, safer oral care solution. We married state-of-the-art ingredients with four decades of dental experience to create LINHART, as the answer to the harmful effects and limitations of commercial brands of oral care.
“By Dentists, For You!” means that every product is specially designed to be better-for-you. No gimmicks, no trends, just the best ingredients and materials to provide you with a healthy, white, beautiful smile.

The inspiration behind the beautiful design?

ZL: Described as “Phillipe Stark-esque” and “The Hermes of Oral Care,” the branding is certainly eye-catching. When we designed the LINHART packaging, we recruited the lead designer at Barneys NYC, a man with a legendary design pedigree. We delivered him all of the familial touchpoints: born of Czechoslovakia, three generations of doctors, emigration to the US in the 1960s, a heritage brand—and out came the most beautiful design we had ever seen.
The Lion crest harks back to the Czech Lion and in wearing a crown, the logo offers a subtle hint of a dental focus. The typeface of LINHART itself is custom and hand-drawn, borrowing inspiration from the Art Deco era of Eastern Europe which still holds strong today. Dr. Ernest Linhart’s original business card text from 1958 is eerily similar and only by coincidence.

 

Can you give us a bit of history of the practice?

ZL: The LINHART legacy began long before our collection hit the shelves. it dates back to 1929 when my grandfather, Dr. Ernest Linhart, graduated from Charles University Medical School in Prague. He left Czechoslovakia, a socialist country in 1966, while a successful and well-known dermatologist, bringing his wife, Magda Linhart, a survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp, and their two children, Jan and Katerina, emigrating to the US in search of freedom and the “American Dream.”
My father Dr. Jan Linhart began his dental practice in New York in 1979 after graduation from Bowdoin College and New York University College of Dentistry. I followed in my father’s footsteps with a Bachelor of Arts in neuroscience from Bowdoin and a DDS degree from NYU. I joined the practice in 2011 after finishing a residency at the Bronx VA.

What part do you see your brand playing in the current culture?

ZL: The LINHART collection’s iconic orange palette brings luxury to mind, the comparison goes beyond aesthetics. There’s an expectation of quality, craftsmanship, and detail that comes to mind. And shouldn’t oral care become a natural part of the larger cultural conversation around self-care? Almost everything that goes into your body enters through your mouth.

 

LINHART’s Oral Care Tips During Quarantine

As your body’s main immuno-gatekeeper, the mouth restricts the entry of harmful bacteria that impacts our digestive and respiratory systems. How do we keep it healthy and clean during quarantine?
  • Just like soap and water disrupt and kill microbes on your hands, brushing your teeth does the same thing for your mouth. Using a fluoridated toothpaste helps in keeping your mouth clean while strengthening your enamel, giving you a healthier smile.
  • The type of toothbrush you use right now really matters. Ideally, you put a toothbrush inside your mouth at least twice a day. But the average toothbrush contains 10 million bacteria or more—including E. coli and Staph Aureus. Look for an anti-bacterial AND an anti-microbial toothbrush with soft bristles to help prevent the spread of germs and bacteria. The soft bristles are better for you as they help alleviate gum recession and/or enamel erosion. The LINHART Toothbrush is infused with nano-silver particles, killing 99% of harmful bacteria, preventing the microbial (viral) proliferation that plagues ordinary toothbrushes.
  • Don’t try DIY dentistry – especially now. Do your research and hang tight before investing in the trendy at-home aligners (you know the ones you see in your Instagram feeds). These kits are potentially dangerous as tooth movement should only be performed by a licensed dentist or orthodontist.

Floss Like a Boss

Look, we get it—flossing is not the sexiest part of a dental routine. But now is the best time to revamp some solid daily habits at home. “Our dental hygienist, Marie, who’s been with our team for 25 years, actually taught me all of the secrets of flossing like a pro,” says Dr. Zach Linhart. Tips include:
1. Wrap the floss around your middle fingers and leave your index fingers free to guide the floss.
2. Make it taut.
3. As you move around the mouth, unroll one side and roll the other so you get a fresh piece of floss between each set of teeth.
4. Brush after flossing. While flossing, you’re removing all the pieces of food and then you can brush them away.
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