Sotheby’s Is Staging a Monumental ‘World of Picasso’ Virtual Auction

 

Pablo Picasso, Jacqueline au chapeau à fleurs 

 

 

Without the buzz of physical events, the art world is has been valiantly hard at work attempting to replicate that buzz online. No surprise, leaders like Gagosian and Deitch have decisively risen to the occasion.

And now Sotheby’s has just announced The World of Picasso, a comprehensive yet surprisingly accessible virtual auction, with bidding taking place from June 8 – 18. However, with London in the beginning stages of re-opening, the auction will also be opened to the public (by prior appointment) from the 15th through the 18th.

Notably, pieces from the personal collection of Pablo’s granddaughter Marina make up the offerings—and the 60-plus works span his exceedingly mercurial career. Amongst them will be paintings, drawings, ceramics, photographs, and even paint palettes (intriguing, certainly). Most importantly, the prices are very much of the approachable sort, ranging from £400 to £400,000.

 

Pablo Picasso, Autour des arènes, circa 1900, pastel on cardboard

 

Remarkably, considering the considerable vagaries of the art world, Picasso—like Warhol—continues to inspire the enthusiasm of the market, despite occasional challenges from some of his more exalted contemporaries…Modigliani, for instance.

“Over the past few years we have seen an incredibly strong demand [for him],” observes Holly Braine, Sotheby’s Impressionist & Modern Art Specialist, “as collectors across the world seek to acquire works of all media and periods by the most globally recognized artist of our time. This sale allows the viewer to explore the full gamut of his production, and invites them to pick their favorite from decades of experimentation—with subjects ranging from the swashbuckling matador and mythological minotaur to the myriad muses that made their mark.”

Muses who, of course, are still imprinting their influence on our contemporary cultural life.

 

Pablo Picasso, Profil de Jacqueline au Foulard, linocut, 1955
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