Get a Closer Look at New Films From Hal Hartley, Liv Ullmann, Bertrand Bonello + More

As we hit the midsummer mark, there’s certainly a slew of big Hollywood films dominating our theater space. But along with that also comes to first trailers for some of the most anticipated films to be released later in the year and those slated to play at the fall’s upcoming festivals. From Hal Hartley’s final chapter of his Henry Fool trilogy Ned Rifle to the brilliant Bertrand Bonello’s Saint Laurent, take a closer look at some of the best trailers hitting the internet thus far this week.

MISS JULIE, Liv Ullmann
Starring: Jessica Chastain, Colin Farrell, and Samantha Morton

Taking place at a large country estate in Britain over the course of one 1880s midsummer night, Miss Julie explores the brutal, flirtatious power struggle between Julie and John – a young aristocratic woman and her father’s valet.

She is all hauteur longing for abasement; he, polished but coarse. The two of them held together by mutual loathing and attraction. At turns seductive and tender, savage and bullying, their story builds inevitably to a mad, impulsive tryst. Plans are made in desperation, a vision of a life together – unsure if the morning light then brings hope or hopelessness, Julie and John find their escape in an act that is as sublime and horrific as anything in Greek tragedy.

Liv Ullman’s Miss Julie will skillfully weave this great original story of the battle between the sexes and the classes.

NED RIFLE, Hal Hartley
Starring: Liam Aiken, Aubrey Plaza, Parker Posey, Martin Donovan, Robert John Burke, and James Urbaniak

http://youtu.be/vNKU8Jf3eEA

At once a saga concerning the Grim family of Queens and how their lives are turned upside down by the arrival of the self-proclaimed genius Henry Fool, the trilogy is also an illustration of America’s grappling with ideas, art, politics, and religion over the course of 20 years. In this swiftly paced and expansive conclusion, Henry and Fay’s son Ned sets out to find and kill his father for destroying his mother’s life. But his aims are frustrated by the troublesome, sexy and hilarious Susan, whose connection to Henry predates even his arrival in the lives of the Grim family.

SAINT LAURENT, Bertrand Bonello
Starring: Gaspard Ulliel, Lea Seydoux, Louis Garrel, and Jeremie Renier 

Bonello’s film covers less chronological ground than “Yves Saint Laurent” but goes a little harder on the hedonism, as you’d expect from the heedless director of “House of Pleasures” and “The Pornographer.” Bonello’s script, written with regular Jacques Audiard collaborator Thomas Bidegain,  focuses less on Saint Laurent’s troubled romance with life partner Pierre Berge (which formed the spine of Lespert’s film) than on his individual neuroses, insecurities and delusions. As such, it’s a less flattering portrait, with machete-cheekboned Gaspard Ulliel an aloof, glassy presence throughout; he’s a more dreamily charismatic presence than Pierre Niney, the twitchy lead of the last film, though he bears less of a physical or behavioral resemblance to the subject. The upside for Saint Laurent’s admirers is that Bonello’s film reflects more of the designer’s tortured creative drive in its dark onyx surfaces; it’s the slightly deranged auteur portrait that a fellow artist and iconoclast deserves.

THE IMITATION GAME,  Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley, Matthew Beard, Matthew Goode

The Imitation Game is a nail-biting race against time following Alan Turing (pioneer of modern-day computing and credited with cracking the German Enigma code) and his brilliant team at Britain’s top-secret code-breaking centre, Bletchley Park, during the darkest days of World War II. Turing, whose contributions and genius significantly shortened the war, saving thousands of lives, was the eventual victim of an unenlightened British establishment, but his work and legacy live on.

JEALOUSY, Philippe Garrel
Starring: Louis Garrel and Anne Mouglalis

Philippe Garrel is one of the major French filmmakers of the post-New Wave who has slowly begun to gain recognition in America after a career spanning 50 years with the release of his most recent films Regular Lovers, Frontier of Dawn, and Burning Hot Summer as well as the re-release of I Can Still Hear the Guitar Playing. Shot in lustrous, widescreen black and white by the great Willy Kurant (Masculin Feminin, Under the Sun of Satan), Jealousy may be Philippe Garrel’s most accessible film in nearly 50 years of filmmaking. The film opens with a man leaving his wife and daughter and, in a series of brief conversations, observed gestures, chance encounters and impulsive acts, tells the story of the relationships that flounder and thrive in the wake of this decision. Louis Garrel, the director’s son and frequent star, plays the husband who moves into a garret apartment with his fellow actor girlfriend (Anne Mouglalis) as they struggle with fidelity and the temptation to give up their art for an easier life. Shot with Garrel’s celebrated sensitivity and attention to faces, bodies, hands and the intricacies of the human heart, Jealousy is an especially intimate, deeply poignant and never less than enthralling tale of love, temptation and betrayal.

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