6 Ways Tetra is the Future of the Smoking Experience

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Photography by:  Charlie Shuck

Tetra is a new online retail project and lifestyle brand dedicated to elevating the aesthetics of the smoking experience. Founded by three prestigious design journalists and curators (Monica Khemsurov, Su Wu, and Eviana Hartman) Tetra sets out to offer a collection of commissioned smoking accessories created by some of the design and fashion world’s most influential artists. This includes a brand new collaboration with Opening Ceremony, a fashion set favorite Bellocq, Miwak Junior, Otaat, Leah Ball and Brooklyn darling Helen Levi.

The concept of Tetra was born from the desire to tap into the ritual of pause that smoking provides from our constantly connected lives and look at this moment as an opportunity to infuse great design. According to Tetra’s founders, in the mid-century period, before smoking was considered taboo, design luminaries of the era like Dieter Rams, Marianne Brandt, and Enzo Mari, created iconic home accessories for smokers to enjoy while engaging in company and conversation. Tetra brings this thought to the present day with their curated collection of contemporary pipes, ashtrays, snuff boxes, lighters, storage pouches, and hand selected vintage accouterments.

Here are six pieces from Tetra’s shop that will elevate both your ritual and home aesthetics.

 

1.) Marbled Pipe Pink by Leah Ball. $90.

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2.) The Balance Pipe designed for Tetra by Jamie Wolfond in collaboration with Opening Ceremony. $65.

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3.) Copper Rolling Tray by Matthias Kaiser. $330.

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4.) Andu Box Moss Agate by Anna NY. $310.

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5.) Octahedron Table Lighter and Ashtray Set by Andrew O. Hughes. $1,250.

 

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6.) Voltaire Pipe by The Pursuits of Happiness. $75.00

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A Calvin Klein Ceramicist Hosts a One Day Pop Up Exhibition

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Photography by Shanita Sims
Text by Sophia Haney Montanez + Elizabeth  Baudouin

 

In the age of digital media and short attention spans, Salon No. Living with Design is set up to view as quickly as your last Snapchat story. On Tuesday, September 13th, artist Romy Northover will host a one-day event to bring a new kind of presentation to fashion week. Here she will integrate a lifestyle and design element to the perpetual runway showings.  Happening just down the street from Spring Studios, Salon No. showcases Northover’s new collection in NES Creative‘s downtown loft to reimagine the space through her signature Ancient Future aesthetic.

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The inspiration for Romy’s new collection is gathered from a large catalogue of references including nature, literature, ancient cultures, and fashion. The influence of layered textiles, subtle textures and muted color palettes in fashion are revealed in the rustic yet refined designs.

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Prior to launching her New York based line No. in 2012, Romy lived and worked in London, graduating with a BA in Fine Art from Goldsmiths. She then lived in Hong Kong, Venice, and Berlin, creating video art, freelancing as a stylist and working for several fashion designers including fashion house PPQ.

Today, she is a regular collaborator with Calvin Klein’s team, where her ceramic vessels enhances the environment of the iconic brand’s retail stores. Romy has also designed collections for Kinfolk, Cereal Magazine, Alex Eagle, Soho House, and The Apartment by The Line.

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Northover’s point of view is immediately delicate and minimalist creating an intimacy with each piece. This thought is cast throughout her entire exhibition. “I want to create a stillness and allow for an openness for receiving,” says Romy. “A relaxed space where the work can be functional and be touched.”  Romy’s aesthetic reveals a new lifestyle, one that blends traditions of the past harmoniously with ideals for the future. And one that transcends the ephemeral trends that have become so common in the age of fast-fashion.

For more information on Salon No. please visit Romy’s Instagram Feed.

Meet the Artist Behind the Color Matching Collages on Miu Miu’s Instagram

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If you’ve been following NYFW, chances are you’ve been refreshing your feed every two minutes. There’s one brand that offers more than runway shows and prep shots and that’s Miu Miu. Here you’ll find the fantastical color matching collages created by mixed media artist Beth Hoeckel. Produced exclusively for Miu Miu’s Instagram feed, Beth assembled an assortment of treasures to best suit pieces from their accessory collection in a reimagined way.

For example, seashells, pink frosted birthday cake, toast with jam and a strawberry daiquiri surround a new eco-shearling bag in coral. Additionally, cherries, a floppy disk, a fire extinguisher, and lifesavers come together to float around Miu Miu’s new Automne ’16 backpack for a most playful digital display.

Beth’s work extends passed fashion and moves across many editorial platforms including stories from publishing heavy weights like Conde Nast and Penguin Random House. With a new book in the works and an exhibition this fall, I was curious to learn more about her inspiration and background.

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How did you become interested in mixed media?

I started experimenting with mixed media techniques quite a bit in high school. I went to an arts magnet high school and mainly focused on painting and photography, and wanted to try combining the two. It also partly came from not being able to afford expensive art materials, and subsequently using whatever was around. I was very drawn to collage and mixed media artists like Robert Rauchenberg and Joseph Cornell. In addition to all that I’ve collected old books and photographs since back then and loved using those elements.

Where do you like to pull images from?

It all comes from vintage books and magazines, or any old printed material. My favorite era of National Geographics are from the late 1940’s and early 1950’s, I love old cook books with color photographs and random sewing and craft catalogs.

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What do you love about communicating with collage?

I love the familiarity of the found images in contrast with the surreal nature of the context I place them in. In that way it can be very relatable. In some ways I think it more readily allows viewers to draw from their own memories and experiences to construct a narrative than some other art forms.

Is there a particular thought you are projecting with your work?

There are several themes. Memory, nostalgia, being lost, getting lost, loss in general, bygone eras and their ideals, hope, longing, and daydreams.

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How did living in New York shape your work?

I moved there in 2001 right after graduating from SAIC (Chicago), I was only 21 and it was right after Sept 11 so it was a strange time. It was a struggle to say the least, I had to work a lot of jobs to pay the bills so I barely had time and definitely didn’t have space to make art. I tried to find ways to make money off of my work so I made cards and t-shirts and sold them to shops on Bedford and even sold them by myself on the streets on occasion.

Where do you find your inspiration?

In music from PJ Harvey, Bob Dylan, Patti Smith, Rimbaud, Paul Bowles- to be honest the book The Sheltering Sky has influenced many of my works over the years.

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Discover more work from Beth Hoeckel here.

The Best Kept Secret in The West Village: Calliope

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With the likes of Marc Jacobs, Joe Malone, and Alexis Bittar lining Bleecker St., it pays to venture off the over populated retail path and make your way towards the river to West 12th St where you’ll discover the shopping oasis that is Calliope.  The store founded by Manhattan couple Caroline and Michael Ventura, is not just a store, it’s an entire thought in lifestyle.  A lifestyle that granted veers more California than New York, but with the current migration of New Yorkers going west, you can be the smart one knowing that you don’t have to move to Los Angeles to get that Cali vibe.

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What makes this place great is that it’s arranged like a shoppable living room. Inside you’ll find a curated collection of vintage, contemporary, and bespoke goods crafted by artisans from Morocco to Brooklyn, including Aaron Poritz, Fort Makers, and Michael Felix. They have everything from large designer furnishings, travel goods, luggage, antique rugs, artisan homewares, jewelry, crystals, sage and vintage records. The ever-rotating supply make the boutique a fresh source of inspiration for a creative and inspired crowd.

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It’s known amongst neighborhood locals that Calliope likes when you hang out. In fact, if you want to grab your laptop for an hour or two you can set up shop with the other locals doing just that or bring a bottle of wine and conversation while you wait for your friends finishing at The Whitney (which is just a few blocks away).

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The one thing Calliope offers over anywhere else in New York is their one-of-a-kind “field trips” with local talent which will send you on a journey in butchery lessons, astrological chart readings, vinyl hunting, drawing classes, and cocktail mixology. Sign us up.

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Calliope is located at 349 West 12th Street, New York, NY 10014.

The Chic New Upstate Weekend Getaway: Rivertown Lodge

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Photography: Matthew Williams

With Labor Day around the corner, there are a few weekends left to properly flee the city sweat and escape to rural pastures. We recommend heading north to historic Hudson, NY and booking a night at the chic (and affordable) Rivertown Lodge.  Located on the town’s main strip, in what was originally a 1920’s movie theater, this 2-story hotel is attracting five borough dwellers and international Instagram photo seekers alike.

The idea of this hotel was to serve something like a public ‘living room’ for Hudson. The lobby includes both vintage and custom pieces all with a Brooklyn Makers spirit. The mini retail concept shop features goods from local artisans and a built in kitchen cultivates the communal vibe over a stellar breakfast bar and Tandem Coffee.

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Located adjacent to the lobby is the bar which has an atmosphere of modern maker meets traditional tavern. The hand-crafted cocktail program is designed by award winning mixologists Natasha David and Jeremy Oerter.

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The room design is spot on for minimalist lovers. Custom beds by Workstead are crafted from turned cherry posts and layered with embroidered blankets. Additional furnishings include tables created by Sawkille in nearby Rhinebeck, NY, vintage wicker side chairs, upholstered reading chairs and lighting designed by Workstead specifically for the hotel. Bathrooms include raw brass fixtures, muted green and blue shower tile, custom-designed shelving and mirrors by craftsman from Brooklyn to Hudson.

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For late night provisions and conversation with your fellow travelers, there is a communal porch to congregate on. And if you’re feeling anti-social and just want to hang with your person, head to the backyard where you’ll find a fully tented ping-pong table for all the privacy you need to finish summer out with a casual game of table tennis.

Fashion Designer KXG Creates Wearable Art in Tropical Bali

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Photography by Krishna Godhead
Text by Katherine Aplin

Tucked away in the dense jungle of southern Bali, KXG Artisanal flourishes into being. Heavy air pulses, warm and humid, pushing forward the creative process of partners in life and work, Katharine Grace and Krishna Godhead. Both of them Australian transplants, they met serendipitously in the mountains of Indonesia. Their instantaneous connection shifted their solo lives towards the manifestation of a shared vision and KXG was born.

KXG marries the harsh and the delicate, creating a relationship of symbiosis, each one feeding off the needs of the other. The expert draping of fine chiffons and silks is blended with the use of structured skins, always revered. An air of heightened craftsmanship flows through the garments, every piece becoming an utterly unique work of wearable art. What results is a collection that is supple yet severe and hauntingly beautiful. Emotion-evoking imagery then propels their creations even further as each photograph of Katharine, shot by Krishna, is not only visually stunning but capable of telling story after story.

The mention of Bali elicits thoughts of lush foliage and sun-drenched skies, but KXG oftentimes puts forth a grave aesthetic, using neutrals and B&W photographs. Can you speak to the contrast at play?

The savage nature of a jungle is a constant play of juxtapositions. Ancient, stoic remnants of temples stand silently in the thick and brutish jungle. The heavy heat of a constant summer maintains itself in the dark shadows created by dense vegetation. Throughout this harsh environment arises hand died raw silks, paper-thin exotic skins, and delicate artisanal hand embroidery. The environment is beautiful and barbaric, creating a dialogue that furthers our creations.

How does your creative process unfold?

After dialog reveals our direction of design, the dress form and experimentation is our next step, along with fabrication. Ultimately, the choice of material and method defines all. Whether we are sculpting a whole crocodile skin around a torso or draping, pleating, and pinning sheets of hand-painted organza, we find the process and evolution of the garment of the greatest importance.

Why is the act of ritual important to the ethos of KXG? 

Part of our structure and DNA is to deeply understand that within this world, there is already so much and of such high turnover, with built-in obsolescence. We make a limited number of unique and one off garments as our collections are small and specific.

We try to produce as little as possible in the way of excessive waste and to understand the toil that is imbued in each raw material, whether it be the loss of life in the skins of an animal, the excesses in the process and production of a simple cotton, or the staggering enormity in the yards of woven worm silk. Our ultimate desire is to produce limited pieces that are intensely personal and precious.

If you could dress anyone, who would it be?

Many women from varied disciplines inspire KXG: women who create, fight and inspire. Women of intelligence, desire and individuality and if to be more specific, fellow Australian Cate Blanchett epitomizes the essence of KXG.

Describe KXG in less than 10 words. 

Honor of sacrifice; create through humility

BlackBook Premiere: New Video by Cerise Brings Lo-Fi Summer Haze

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With a little help and encouragement from musician Joseph Arthur, LA based model/photographer, Cerise found a natural stride with writing songs and making music. What started as a casual friendship with Arthur led to her hanging around his studio and recording background vocals for whatever he was working on.  Watching the process of recording music unfold captured Cerise’s fascination and ultimately led to her buying a guitar, writing her own songs, and making her own album (which Arthur produced). Cerise’s songs do a great job of melding her influences of The Cure, Bauhaus and Siouxsie And The Banshees to create her own sound that nets out closer to Cat Power but with more drone and fuzz. From her debut album, Smoke Screen Dreams (Self-Released) we bring you the video for the track ‘To Go Away’ which, from the first frame, plunges us right into Cerise’s lo-fi kaleidoscope of emotions, visuals and sound.  Directed by, Tina Rivera, the video is shot entirely underwater to give the feeling of what the song is really all about.

“The song ‘To Go Away’ is about wanting to leave a situation or person and the feeling at that moment. The excitement and need to leave but the fear of leaving what you know so well and feeling pulled back in. [The song] is also about wanting to lose yourself in a moment or feeling whether its good for you or not.” – Cerise 

 

 

BlackBook Premiere: Blonde Redhead’s Long Lost Demo Tapes

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Picture it. New York City. The Lower East Side. 1994. A time when The NY Times described downtown as a “drug netherworld” where pure heroin like “China Cat” was being sold on sordid corners and the streets “smelled worse than an open air fish market in Chinatown.”  This was New York life Pre-Giuliani where grit and garbage was caking the city and music was being made to reflect the situation.  You had bands like Helmet up the street in the East Village leading the post-metal genre with their heavy distortion and (the then unknown) Blonde Redhead taking to a shitty rehearsal space on Rivington St. to record the 4-track demos that would establish them as the noise rock scene staple.

Long out of print, these early recordings will be soon be released in box set form (4LP/2CD) by Numero Group on September 30th.  Boasting 37 tracks, Blonde Redhead’s Masculin Féminin compiles the band’s first two albums (self-titled and La Mia Via Violenta), their period singles, extant demos, and radio performances. The release also features dozens of previously unpublished photographs illustrating the band’s formative years in the city.

BlackBook premieres the first lost demo, “This is the Number of Times I Said I Will and I Didn’t.”

 

Swedish R&B Electro Songstress, Janice Gets a True Panther Remix

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Photography: Per Kristiansen

There are some songs you hear once and forget about and then there are songs that stay on repeat all day.  Swedish singer, Janice gives us just the track.  The 22-year-old songstress has a voice powered with depth and emotional richness beyond her years. She’s easily reminiscent of (and compared to) the R&B greats of the 80s and 90s. Her debut song “Don’t Need To” received indie blog acclaim earlier this year, but it’s Janice’s newest collaboration with Danish producer, True Panther’s Taragana Pyjarama that takes the song to addictive status.  With infectious loops and atmospheric additions, this remix is nothing short of a glistening electro-pop gem sure to make your midsummer playlist.

Janice will release her debut EP this fall.