The Best Posts from Beyoncé’s Birthday Party in NYC

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@Beyonce on Instagram

Beyoncé turned 35 this weekend, and celebrated with the party of the year at the NoMad Hotel in New York. The guest list for the “Soul Train”-themed soiree included everyone from Chance the Rapper, to Alicia Keys, to Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams, to Diddy, and Usher, and so on. Check out our favorite moments from the bash below:

Chance the Rapper giving his hero some love:

Bey & her nephew Chance ️ #Beyonce

A photo posted by Sha. (@yoncesince81) on

Alicia Keys and Swizz Beats turning up in supreme style:

Diddy chilling in the kitchen:

Janelle Monae assuming control of the dancefloor:


Blue Ivy delivering her mom a layered birthday cake:

 

And, finally, Bey and Jay dancing the night away:

They must’ve put Blue to bed ?? Jay could not keep up lol #beyonce

A video posted by Sha. (@yoncesince81) on

BlackBook Premiere: Blonde Redhead’s Long Lost Demo Tapes

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Picture it. New York City. The Lower East Side. 1994. A time when The NY Times described downtown as a “drug netherworld” where pure heroin like “China Cat” was being sold on sordid corners and the streets “smelled worse than an open air fish market in Chinatown.”  This was New York life Pre-Giuliani where grit and garbage was caking the city and music was being made to reflect the situation.  You had bands like Helmet up the street in the East Village leading the post-metal genre with their heavy distortion and (the then unknown) Blonde Redhead taking to a shitty rehearsal space on Rivington St. to record the 4-track demos that would establish them as the noise rock scene staple.

Long out of print, these early recordings will be soon be released in box set form (4LP/2CD) by Numero Group on September 30th.  Boasting 37 tracks, Blonde Redhead’s Masculin Féminin compiles the band’s first two albums (self-titled and La Mia Via Violenta), their period singles, extant demos, and radio performances. The release also features dozens of previously unpublished photographs illustrating the band’s formative years in the city.

BlackBook premieres the first lost demo, “This is the Number of Times I Said I Will and I Didn’t.”

 

Five Must-See Videos to Celebrate Transgender Icon Candy Darling’s Birthday

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Now a prized fixture of Andy Warhol’s Factory scene, Candy Darling, originally nicknamed “Hope Slattery,” was way ahead of her time, pioneering a gender-fluid movement decades before the nation was ready to accept such identities in the way it does today.

“There is one thing I must tell you because I just found it to be a truth,” Darling famously said. “You must always be yourself no matter what the price. It is the highest form of morality.” Though these words would’ve been viewed as rebellious in the distant days Darling stormed NYC streets in stilettos, in 2015 they sound wonderfully relevant—a subtle testament to the cultural impact of this underground superstar.

To celebrate Darling’s birthday—she would’ve been 71, today—we’ve compiled our favorite videos, all featuring the trans trailblazer.

Candy Darling in Flesh:

 Andy Warhol and Candy Darling Interview:

Candy Darling at the Whitney Museum:

Candy Warhol in Women in Revolt:

Candy Darling sings 1928’s “Ramona:”

A Rare Tour of Donald Judd’s Home, the Judd Foundation in Soho

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An exclusive photo tour of the Judd Foundation in Soho, just above ‘Make art, not pipelines, Get in on the Ground Floor’ open now for limited public viewing.

Studio space featuring two works by Dan Flavin (and a few permanent Donald Judd installations) opened to the public on Friday and Saturday last weekend, available for free viewing for the first time. Make art, not pipelines, Get in on the Ground Floor is on view as the first part of the series of temporary installations at 101 Spring Street, the Judd Foundation in Soho. Just upstairs from the ground floor is the rest of the Judd Foundation, the site of the late artist Donald Judd’s New York home. Everything there is exactly as Judd lived and left it, from kitchen utensils to early Dan Flavin works (the artists were friends) to a personal library to bedding. Get an inside look at Donald Judd’s Soho home below, and get some minimal home design inspiration while you’re at it.

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101 Spring Street, New York, 1st Floor, 1974, courtesy Judd Foundation Archives. Image © Barbara Quinn, Licensed by VAGA
(Note: Whitney Independent Study Program Seminar with artist Donald Judd at his studio in 1974. On Judd’s left is Ron Clark, and on his right is artist Julian Schnabel.)

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101 Spring Street, New York, 2nd Floor. Photo credit: Mauricio Alejo-Judd Foundation Archives. Image © Judd Foundation. Licensed by VAGA

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101 Spring Street, New York, 2nd Floor. Photo credit: Mauricio Alejo-Judd Foundation Archives. Image © Judd Foundation. Licensed by VAGA.

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101 Spring Street, New York, 3nd Floor, Library. Photo credit: Joshua White-Judd Foundation Archives. Image © Judd Foundation. Licensed by VAGA.

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101 Spring Street, New York, 3nd Floor, Library. Photo credit: Mauricio Alejo-Judd Foundation Archives. Image © Judd Foundation. Licensed by VAGA.

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101 Spring Street, New York, 4th Floor. Photo credit: Joshua White-Judd Foundation Archives. Image © Judd Foundation. Licensed by VAGA.

 

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101 Spring Street, New York, 5th Floor. Photo credit: Joshua White-Judd Foundation Archives. Image © Judd FoundationFlavin artwork © 2012 Stephen Flavin/(ARS), © Chamberlain artwork/(ARS), © Claes Oldenburg. Licensed by VAGA.

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Second Floor, 101 Spring Street, New York, NY. Photo: Joshua White.

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Second Floor, 101 Spring Street, New York, NY. Photo: Joshua White.

 

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101 Spring Street, New York, Exterior. Photo credit: Joshua White-Judd Foundation Archives. Image © Judd Foundation. Courtesy Judd Foundation Archives. Licensed by VAGA.

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Donald Judd Portrait, 1991. Image © Judd Foundation. Courtesy Judd Foundation Archives. Licensed by VAGA.

Is the American Dream Dead or Alive?

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James Marshall photographed by Jaesung Lee for BlackBook Magazine

If you listened strictly to the news pouring out of televisions and newspapers across the country, you’d think America was in the pits. Political tensions run high, incomes are low, and that’s to say nothing of the inequalities rampant in minority communities. It’s bad news all around. James Marshall, whose other projects include West Village restaurant Whitehall, wanted to know if the bad news rang true: Was the American dream dead? Marshall called up Cole Haan and recruited friend and photographer Todd Williams to accompany him on a monthlong motorcycle ride to visit eight American towns and cities and staying along the way with people met entirely through social media. The resulting series, The American Dream Project, shows a more hopeful, persevering side of the United States not often seen in the news. Marshall, by the way, learned to ride a motorcycle only three weeks before embarking on his journey. 

What gave you the idea for The American Dream Project?

I had one too many of those days spent barraged by bad news in the media. This is such a great country. I’m from Windsor, about 25 miles west of London, but moved here seven years ago. I thought, No, I’m not going to just listen to this. Let’s find out if this news is true. Is the American dream dead? That seed grew into The American Dream Project.

What were your views of America before you moved here, what did the American dream mean to you then?

Actually, when I came to New York with a little bit of cash, I was so convinced I would be robbed that I split my money–it wasn’t so much, a few hundred dollars–into socks and distributed it around my apartment. I was living in the West Village. I just had an address and a key, and I moved here with that worry. JaesungLee_JamesMarshall_ColeHaan_BB
James Marshall photographed by Jaesung Lee for BlackBook Magazine

I’m surprised you had those worries about moving to a safe neighborhood like the West Village.

But within a few months you realize it’s the safest city in the world. You realize that Americans like people who work hard; they want you to succeed. And if you work hard, you can go somewhere, you can be successful.

Were you ever afraid this project wasn’t going to happen?

This was the biggest project I’ve done so far. I didn’t fully understand how expensive it was to pull a crew together and go across the country for a month. I approached Cole Haan because their philosophy and mine were almost identical. Like me, they believe that substance and quality mean something in today’s world. Cole Haan is also an iconic American brand, founded by immigrants just like me. This project would not have happened without them.

In filming The American Dream Project you met your hosts through social media.

I wanted this to be as genuine as possible. I wanted to meet real people, and the best way to do that was via social media. We sent out blasts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, hashtagging like crazy in the hope that people would reach out.

Were you surprised at how warm and inviting these total strangers were to the request of hospitality for two guys on motorcycles riding across America?

I was blown away. Complete strangers invited Todd and I into their homes, and in some cases, they put up the entire crew.

We’re all human; we want to connect. Yet it’s always a surprise when you connect with people outside of your normal day to day.

The media fills your mind with whatever they are putting out. We are bombarded with sensational or salacious news that doesn’t really feed us anything positive. If you’re not careful about what to listen to, we do tend to, or I tend to, think we are very different. But actually, we’re not. Most people want the same things: security, safety, validation, and to dream. My experience was that we really do have much more in common than we are told we have. It is kind of liberating. ColeHaan_JamesMarshall_JaesungLee_BlackBook_3
James Marshall photographed by Jaesung Lee for BlackBook Magazine

Was allowing social media and chance to dictate your project a different kind of creative process than what you are used to?

I’m used to having an idea and being able to direct something well produced. Here, I didn’t know what the end was going to be. It was refreshing because it was, “Who am I going to meet today?” It was very exciting and nerve-racking because this thing could have been a bust. It could have been one sad story after another.

How do you view creativity?

The new creativity is freedom–people are making movies on iPhones. Social media allows you to collaborate globally. You could have musicians in one country provide music for a Web series that is being made in another country. Everyone can be a creative talent. That could be good and bad because there is a lot of content out there. We need a creative revolution, which we’re in the midst of. With so many online outlets and cameras on every phone, people can make what they want, when they want, and get it out there.

How has this new wave of creativity altered the American dream?

The new wave of creativity has actually enabled people to dream and be inspired by other people’s work because they can see it within minutes of being made. It’s doesn’t have to be an executive in Hollywood but a kid in bumblefuck nowhere making things happen. There are no walls anymore; the walls have come down. 

Did your idea of the American dream change throughout filming?

It definitely evolved as I went along. But I think before I left, I had a view of the American dream that I think most people have, which is this postwar idea of a big house, white picket fence, 2.4 kids, and a dog. That is a prescribed American dream that is put in the minds of many of us, and that’s gone. But what I’ve seen replace that is staggering because it’s evolved into something better. Rather than people aiming for a preprescribed dream, it’s become an individual pursuit. People have now taken up the mantle to think of their own dream. Now the American dream is absolutely individual to each person, which I think is great. For people to be enabled to really dream is exciting. Discover more about the series here.

This story appears in the spring 2015 issue of BlackBook Magazine on stands now.

Athos: The Future of Fitness Is Now

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Gabriela (Re:Quest Models) and Mark Sopcik photographed by Fred P. Goris. Styling by Alyssa Shapiro

These compression shorts are made by a start-up called Athos and contain embedded EMG sensors that feed information on muscle effort and activation to an app on the user’s phone, allowing lab-quality monitoring of one’s own workout. The matching compression top launches this spring, alongside special partnerships with some of the country’s most elite trainers, like Stephen Cheuk, whose New York gym S10 is photographed here. Using Athos, Cheuk is able to instruct trainees on how to better activate the right muscles for the right exercise — plus tell if they’re cheating the movement.

Rapid arm movements with the rope create tension throughout the body, providing a concentrated arm workout and also strengthening the core and lower body.

Properly monitoring muscle activation during lunges ensures both legs receive a good workout.

At S10, Stephen Cheuk’s trainees focus on anabolic conditioning work. That means less jogging and more pushing the Prowler.

Few exercises build more muscle quickly than a squat — Athos allows trainers to ensure that the correct sequence of muscles is activated through the movement, essential to both increasing strength and maintaining safety.


Mark wears Athos shorts and his own shoes. Gabriela wear (from left) Athos capris, S10 sports bra, Nike Bonded Woven Bomber Jacket, Nike Flyknit Zoom Fit Agility sneakers; Athos capris, NikeLab x JFS cropped long-sleeved top, Nike Pro Fierce sports bra, Nike Flyknit Roshe Run sneakers

Grooming by Ashley Rebecca

This story appears in the spring 2015 issue of BlackBook Magazine on stands now

 

The Creators: Jean Lauer

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Jean Lauer photographed by Skye Parrott for BlackBook Magazine

Of the hundreds of billions of dollars spent on home renovations in the United States last year, a respectable portion came from the startup Sweeten, which listed projects totaling over $150 million. Jean Lauer, the site’s founder and chief executive officer, expects to see that number grow, and the trend lines point in
the right direction. Last year the National Association of Home Builders’ chief economist, David Crowe, said in a statement that the only roadblock to a “slow, steady recovery of the housing industry” was a “shortage of qualified labor and subcontractors.” Sweeten aims to correct this market inefficiency by making it easier to find a contractor.

The platform operates like this: Homeowners list their project and all of its details, while contractors, architects, and designers bid. Once a contract is awarded, Sweeten checks in at the beginning, middle, and end of construction to make sure all is well. Centralizing the process introduces a wealth of safeguards against fraud and shoddy work. Sweeten’s projects range from $15,000 renovations to a $15 million residential development in Queens. “Whatever price point they are working at, the contractors just have to be great at what they do,” Lauer says. Installing new kitchens or ripping out bathrooms might not seem like an area rife for digital disruption, but just as Uber flipped the old hand-in-the-air method of taxi-hailing on its head, Sweeten may turn out to be revolutionary in its own right.

This article appears in the spring 2015 issue of BlackBook on stands now.

Where To Sip What Wine In NYC: Three Wine Bars To Know

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Photo: Courtesy of Corkbuzz

What could be better than ending the day with a light, springy wine? Even if it’s not feeling much like spring, that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t go about our April business as intended. Three top NYC wine bars lent us their sommeliers to let us in on their seasonal faves. Not that we needed any encouragement to indulge, but custom recommendations will serve.

Corkbuzz

Chelsea Market, 75 9th Avenue, New York, NY 10011 and 13 East 13th Street, New York, NY 10003

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CB_CM_36_WEB

CB_CM_Banquettes_WEBPhotos: Courtesy of Corkbuzz

Corkbuzz’s master sommelier Laura Maniec’s shares her picks for three rosés featured in Corkbuzz’s new “Spring into Rosé” tasting.

Christophe Lepage Pinot Gris Rosé ’12, Côtes Saint Jacques, Burgundy, France “This is the lightest of the three Rosés on this list. It’s got more of a dry, French style. It’s pale pink in color, and is an easy-drinking Rosé. What’s interesting about this wine is that it’s made from a white grape, which is a super rare style of Rosé,” Maniec notes.

Arnot-Roberts ‘Luchsinger Vineyard’ Touriga Nacional Rosé ’14, Clear Lake, California “Arnot-Roberts is a boutique California producer. It’s a limited production Rosé that is sure to sell out before Spring even gets started,” Maniec says. “We managed to get our hands on just a few cases. It’s a slightly richer wine with notes of strawberries and hibiscus,” Maniec notes–you might want to hurry over to try this one sooner than later.

Altura ‘Chiaretto’ Sangiovese Rosé ’10, Isola del Giglio, Tuscany, Italy “This is one of my personal favorite Rosés of the moment. It actually looks like a light red. This wine is from an island just off the coast of Tuscany. It has a little more tannins than most Rosés. It’s perfect for meat dishes like a grilled hanger steak salad or something with pork. It’s got a ripe, refreshing acidity that also lends itself to pasta dishes,” Maniec says.

La Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels

249 Centre Street, New Yok, NY 10013

La Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels - New York, NY

compagnie de vins surnaturels - new york, nyPhotos: ©Noah Fecks

The wine selection at La Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels is curated by Fabien Suquet and Caleb Ganzer.
Faugères Château de la Liquière, Les Amandiers 2013
“I chose this wine because when the almond (amandier) trees are in bloom, it’s a sign in the south of France that spring has arrived and winter is on its way out,” Suquet tells BlackBook. “This wine was born on schist soil perfect for the season, from grape varieties of carignan, grenache, syrah and mourvedre.  This wine, created by winemakers Sophie and Laurent Dumoulin, accompanies beautiful days with sips of red fruits and sweet spice for good balance. It’s fresh and crispy and goes well with lighter foods like salads, and even BBQ.” Suquet says. 
Goisot, Sauvignon de Saint Bris, Burgundy 2013
“A favorite wine of mine that works perfectly with the Spring weather, and the Spring mindset, is Goisot, Sauvignon de Saint Bris, Burgundy, France 2013. It’s on our list at $43 and completely over-delivers. Yes, this is Sauvignon Blanc. Yes, this is Burgundy. Despite what we are normally taught, the two are not entirely mutually exclusive,” Ganzer explains. “Saint Bris is located nearly equidistant from Sancerre, Chablis & Champagne, thus you have this great confluence of temperate growing climates which keep the fruit flavors of Sauvignon Blanc in check along with chalky limestone soils with fossilized oyster shells which lend a ton of fresh minerality to the finish. It’s the perfect wine for a spring pea & scallop risotto or roasted asparagus & chèvre,” Ganzer suggests. 
 
Domaine Comte Abbatucci, Rouge Frais Impérial, Corsica, 2013 “Red wine is not usually the first thing one thinks of when Spring is mentioned, however this light rouge has enough bright, crisp fruit flavors to provide as much refreshment as any good white: Domaine Comte Abbatucci, Rouge Frais Impérial, Corsica, France 2013. Made with the local Sciacarellu (sha-kuh-RELL-oo) grape, this wine has a deft, feminine touch of cranberry & pomegranate fruit notes with a slight smokey, granite underpinning of mineral flavor. I like it with a slight chill to help make the fruit notes pop. A great wine for lamb carpaccio!” Ganzer says, making a case for reds in spring. 
 

Vin Sur Vingt

1140 Broadway, New York, NY 10001 and 201 West 11th Street, New York, NY 10014, and The Plaza Food Hall at 1 West 59th Street | New York, NY 10019

VSV NoMad Back_ChariniPhoto: Charini H.

VSV NoMad Bar Relf_Sean JPhoto: Sean Jones

VSV NoMad Front_BW_ChariniPhoto: Charini H.

VSV NoMad Full Bar ChariniPhoto: Charini H.

VSV Wine SelectionPhoto: Courtesy of Vin Sur Vingt

The experts at Vin Sur Vingt suggest the following two wines as their top picks for a visit to their bar for spring.

Touraine Chenonceaux, Domaine Vieil Orme 2012 “The vines used for these wines are between 25-35 years old. It’s a 100% Sauvignon Blanc. Domaine Vieil Orme is a traditional artisanal producer practicing sustainable farming since 2009. The aromas include passion fruit, pear, and almonds.”

Côte de Duras, Domaine Mouthes le Bihan 2011 “This is a 50-plus year old vine (certified organic). The grapes include Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle.  The aromas include citrus and white peaches, with squashed fresh grapes.  This wine offers good structure and fat on the palate.”

Check out our guide to spring wines and the best wine bars in San Francisco here. 

 

 

CFDA Fashion Fund Finalist Ryan Roche’s Can’t-Live-Without NYFW Guide

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Photo: Matteo Prandoni/BFAnyc.com

“You know I live upstate, right?” asks designer Ryan Roche when prompted to share her absolute favorite spots to frequent in NYC.

I do. And it sounds so lovely to be able to leave this crowded, bustling, dirty city behind for greener pastures — perhaps that’s why the colors Roche uses in her collections are so clean, dreamy, soft… (Her fall/winter 2015 collection, by the way, was no exception. Monochromatic layering, and sensual, graceful knits reigned. It was lovely.)

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Photo via @alyssashapiro on Instagram

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Photo via @blackbookmag on Instagram

Though she spends the majority of her time upstate and away from all the New York City noise, Roche has to make the occasional trip into the big city — after all, the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund finalist has meetings with Anna Wintour, retailers, and a NYFW presentation to tend to. When she’s in town, these are her go to spots:

To eat: “I love Il Buco.” (47 Bond Street, NYC)

To indulge: “I love going to the Great Jones Spa — that’s amazing.” (29 Great Jones Street, NYC)

For fresh air: Central Park, where she can take her pet poodle. “It’s very gorgeous.”