Nicole Kidman and Kirsten Dunst Sleep With + Torture Colin Farrell in New ‘The Beguiled’ Trailer

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The first trailer for Sofia Coppola’s next film, The Beguiled, is here, and it looks amazing. Nicole Kidman steps away from her role of Celeste in “Big Little Lies” to play a more vengeful woman, caught in a jealous love triangle with Colin Farrell and Kirsten Dunst. And let’s not forget that Elle Fanning is hanging around as well, and all three of the women seem to be plotting ways to kill Farrell.

The movie is set in a gorgeous Southern manor home, where several women float through the halls in long, lacy dresses a la the latest Brooke Candy video. Things get emotional when Farrell is found in the yard outside the mansion and all the women decide they want to get a piece of that.

Most importantly, though, is the electric blue glow of Kidman’s eyes as she contemplates violence and sex while wearing a big white bonnet.

Take a look at the trailer below, and set your phone countdown for June 23, when the movie arrives in select theaters:

Hanro Turns 130, Still Looks Good

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Hanro, the Swiss lingerie and loungewear go-to is celebrating its 130th anniversary. In honor of the occasion, the brand’s flagship store in the meatpacking district is hosting a retrospective exhibit titled, “130 Years of Dressing the World’s Most Seductive Women.”

A number of artists (Izak Zenous, Esther Bayer, Petra Dufkova, Marc-Antoine Coulon, and Miles McMillan) have all contributed interpretations of some of HANRO’s most iconic moments to the exhibit. These momentous moments in the brand’s history include Marilyn Monroe in The Seven Year Itch, Nicole Kidman in Eyes Wide Shut, as well as style icons Kate Moss, Sharon Stone, Kate Upton, and Jamie King all wearing pieces by HANRO


Jaime King by Marc-Antoine CoulonJaime King by Marc-Antoine Coulon


Kate Upton by Marc-Antoine CoulonKate Upton by Marc-Antoine Coulon


Nicole Kidman by Marc-Antoine CoulonNicole Kidman by Marc-Antoine Coulon


Sharon Stone by Esther BayerSharon Stone by Esther Bayer

Check out the exhibit open now through January 15th at the Hanro flagship store, 806 Washington Street. 

Happy Birthday, Baz Luhrmann!

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Happy 52nd birthday to Australian filmmaker Baz Luhrmann, known for directing such films as Romeo + Juliet, Moulin Rouge, and The Great Gatsby. A softy for a love story, Luhrmann seems to have a fetish for the doomed couple in his movies, frequently casting the likes of heartbreakers Leonardo Di Caprio and Nicole Kidman. Enjoy the best of his work along with a motivational music video he made called “Everybody’s Free To Wear Sunscreen.”

ROMEO + JULIET

MOULIN ROUGE
THE GREAT GATSBY

Full ‘Anchorman 2’ Trailer Voids Any Hope For Funny Sequel

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In the pantheon of somewhat amusing things run into the ground by an appalling fan base, the first Anchorman film certainly has a place of pride. Its admittedly enjoyable premise—satirizing the sexual mores of the 1970s with three-degrees less subtlety than Mad Men employs when mocking the 1960s—became something for fratty, Family Guy-watching bros to quote without the slightest sense of irony. Anchorman 2 should almost definitely make things worse.

Even for a sequel, the set-up here is drab: instead of the 1970s, it’s the 1980s, because times change and also they ran out of 1970s jokes in the first movie. The original news team—Ron, Champ, Brian and Brick, and maybe the newswoman played by Christina Applegate, if they remember—set out to create a 24-hour news channel, so expect lots of potshots at CNN. Thankfully, the network fully deserves them.

The flip side to this plot is Will Ferrell’s terminally-oblivious Ron Burgundy is dating a black woman, which gives him the opportunity to spout racist commentary at dinner with her extended family. Humor! What remains to be seen is which of the seemingly hundreds of cameos will be worst: the cast, according to IMDb, includes Nicole Kidman, Liam Neeson, Kirsten Dunst, Sacha Baron Cohen, Harrison Ford, Kanye West, Greg Kinnear, Tina Fey, and Amy Poehler, none of whom exactly need to lend their name to trash like this. Okay, maybe Kanye. 

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Chatting with Actor Matthew Goode on His Charmingly Evil Role in ‘Stoker’

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English actor Matthew Goode must have an affinity for playing the role of the emotionally and psychologically destructive catalyst. We first fell in love with him in the elegant Brideshead Revisted then Tom Ford’s A Single Man and with his latest role in Park Chan-wook’s fantastical Stoker, we see the darker side of the devilishly handsome Englishman.

In Stoker, Goode plays Charlie, the estranged brother-in-law to Evie (Nicole Kidman) and uncle of India (Mia Wasikowska) who comes to stay with the isolated mother and daughter after the death of his brother. With tales of his world travels, a flair for cooking, and a penchant for gardening, he woos the unstable mother of the house, charming his way into her trust. And although India finds herself reluctant to his friendly advances, she eventually becomes infatuated with him and realizes that the two have more in common than she could have ever anticipated. Goode plays the enigmatic role to perfection, vacillating between innocence and poise and the repressed madness of a villainous spider waiting to bite.

Yesterday, I sat down with Goode to talk about his introduction to the film, taking on such an evil character, and working with the brilliant Director Park.

So I’ve been listening to the film’s soundtrack all week. It’s amazing and plays such an important role in the film. Did you know that the music would be so integral?
I think originally we just knew about Philip Glass. He had written a few of the pieces and I think I was under the illusion he would be doing it all. But I think it’s quite nice sometimes—that’s what happened with Tom [Ford] when he did A Single Man, he used two different composers—to have two different takes. I think it added a lot. And what Clint does is a very different thing.

Well, Clint’s is a character in the movie.
Yes exactly, or many different characters. But it was nice, like some of whistling I did was incorporated into the soundtrack. I was like, wow that sounds quite good!

I loved that it followed you everywhere.
A tune of a lonely man, I love that.

How did you first come into the film?
Well Colin Firth dropped out because he was too busy. He desperately wanted to do it, I know that he loves Director Park, as we all do, but he was very generous and he said, I’d love to be doing it but if it’s anyone it’s you taking it over—which was really nice of him. But it was still a process, it wasn’t offered, so I had a Skype session with Director Park for about an hour and then you know, went through the gamut of auditions and eventually my name just stayed in the hat for as long as it was and I found out a couple months later. It was kind of a long process but thank god it worked out.

What did you think the first time you read the script?
I loved it. I thought it was very different. I couldn’t really put my finger on the sort of genre it would be like and also I knew Director Park’s work from Oldboy so that was very exciting. And I hadn’t worked with Nicole or Mia but had great respect for their work. And the character— particularly his involvement in the story—I just thought was quite fascinating and something I hadn’t done, which is something you always want as an actor, something new to get your teeth into. I was like well, it’s a no brainer.

Were you nervous at about playing this very psychologically dense character?
I’m always nervous. There’s always a first day on set when you’re thinking, oh god I hope I’m not found out. I was always worried about how much are we going to show and luckily, I think Director Park and I were always on the same page of what to try and reveal and what not to reveal and do you want to answer every single question about this guy? But also, you can’t just have a two-dimensional bad guy, you have to try and psychologically make sense, certainly for the actor whose playing it and for the audience, there has to be something there. So I suppose in the sense that this is a coming of age story for India, for Uncle Charlie I felt like it was, not converse to that, but in sense he’s sort of trapped in a childhood state in some ways. All the main characters are so isolated and lonely that you know, as much as the acts Uncle Charlie and India get caught up in are fairly despicable, there is this need and that someone else is like him and he needs to be with them and around them and it’s a comfort to the loneliness.

All of the characters were very pure in their emotion, and acted on everything they felt without remorse for it.
Morally moribund in some ways, you know? They don’t judge themselves, they just do. And it’s sort of animalistic in a way and that idea of nature/nurture and if there’s a predisposition within the family bloodline to commit these acts—which is kind of fascinating. And then you think, who is the prey and who are the predators? And I think within that is that sort of triangle status is which is ever-changing.

How do you prepare to play a character like this who, you have to repress all your knowledge of in order to slowly reveal himself to the audience?
I think that’s always the same for any job that you do, you do all your preparation and then you throw it out the window and commit just to what that scene is about. You’re always jumping around, it’s very rare for you to shoot something narratively—I’ve never done that it would be a real joy actually to go on that journey. So I try not to think about things too much. And this was really rehearsed in a way that I liked rehearsing, not getting it up on its feet too much. It was very much sitting down and reading it rather than trying to block it, because often times you try and rehearse things and you’re not in the environment that you’ll be shooting in and it becomes quite confusing. So we talked about it a lot and whatever scene you’re doing,  you know where your character is on the x/y graph of emotion and the trajectory of your arc, and you go on and do it.

How was working with Mia and Nicole—someone who is such a legendary actress and then this fascinating young women who—
Is going to be.

Exactly.
I don’t think I had any preconceptions. I was slightly nervous meeting Nicole, but the great thing about meeting her is that you just go, oh god you’re so lovely and super professional and super hard-working. She’s quite inspiring really, particularly because I’m a parent now as well and you see someone who is balancing very much their work but also it’s not lost on her that she needs to get home because the kids need feeding; it’s kind of lovely. And she’s a bloody good actress and I thought the combination of all three of us was quite nice. We sort of have the same style. We’re quite good listeners and obviously my character and Mia’s character have a lot in common, so it was lovely working with her. I love her to death, she’s such a sweetheart and she’s quite shy but the more we got to know each other she came out of her shell completely with me. We used to go out a lot because its nice to relax when you’re filming so much and my family was over with me, so we’d often get a babysitter and go down and listen to some country music and hang out in bars. My Mrs. and her would go two-stepping around some honky-tonk bars. She’s such a quality actress though.

Did you spend a lot of time together before shooting, or perhaps there’s the immediacy of not spending a lot of time together because your characters sort of fall into each other and have to grow from there.
I’m sure other directors might have kept us apart until that first day because our characters hadn’t seen each other in 20 years, so they might have thought that was an interesting idea that we’d rehearse separately and then see what happens. But we spent a couple weeks together rehearsing and then went on and did it. I think if we hadn’t know each other beforehand it would have been more of a hindrance than a help. So it was good.

Aesthetically speaking, the film was stunning and so meticulous, everything from the transitions to the colors—
The hair shot? Come on. But India’s hair color is matched to mine actually and she wore contact lenses as well so that our eyes were as similar as they could possibly be because my change color quite a bit. That was tying into the idea the there was this possible pre-disposition in the bloodline, that similarity.

There was a great physicality to your character and the way he interacted with India and Evie, like a waltz between everyone
There is and particularly at the end, and Director Park was talking about this earlier, that final scene is a mirroring of the scene where she says, “But I always lead.” I think really that’s what Mia and I talked about but didn’t rehearse specifically together is the idea of prey and the hunted and the animal and this stealth to the characters, which I’m glad you picked up on.

And of course, I loved the piano scene between you and Mia.
It’s kind of out there!

Well, it was a huge moment in the film. Did you actually play piano?
Oh, I hadn’t played it in 20 years. So I took a lot of rehearsal, had a great teacher, and coming back having not played in so long and playing to a Philip Glass piece was not the easiest—arpeggio crazy!  So it was kind of tough, but we could play like a good 3/5 of the piece and were able to fake the rest by having our hands placed in the right places on the keyboard, not necessarily with the right notes. But it’s nice for the director to be able to lower the camera down and see that we were playing. It was hard because you’re sort of like, you’re doing an action that doesn’t come naturally to you and you’re also having to act at the same time, but I think it paid off really well. I think it’s a really big moment in the film like it’s a big ol’ euphemism for something else. And there’s also the element of, well is it in her imagination? There’s always that extra layer to it.

And it’s the first time it feels very sexual and you can tell she’s changing.
With the feet it’s like a Billy Wilder meets Lynch moment or something.

I loved all of the shots throughout the film of her feet actually and the spider crawling up. And you’re kind of this spider working his way into their lives.
Yes I am! Yes it is, right now! The spider found a home.

So what is the experience like of working with Director Park?
I just adore him. I really do, I think he’s amazing. I love Oldboy from back in the day, so I knew that this is a proper filmmaker with great repute and wonderful respect for his actors and the material. But I think that’s what’s so funny about him, a lot of the films he’s made have such incredible violence but actually he himself is so peaceful and charming and super intelligent and fastidious and exacting. So yeah, there was no problem. We had a translator too so there wasn’t even a problem with communication. It was fairly seamless really and I really zone out listening to him speak Korean, I find it incredibly soothing so he kept us quite relaxed with that on set really.

When you’re playing someone like Uncle Charlie, do you feel like you need to find a way to relate to him? Or do you find a way to get to the core of who he is and just understand more of his motives?
I don’t ask that question to myself but I think there are parts where you go, I don’t have to think about that, I get that. And then there are obviously bits where you have to use your imagination when you’re playing a sociopath but it has to be back up with a kind of psychological truth as well. I give myself quite a hard time as a an actor but not too much on this job, which was good.

Image via Fox Searchlight

Speaking With Director Park Chan-wook About His Stunning ‘Stoker’

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As deliciously evil and thrilling as it is visually-rich and haunting, Park Chan-wook’s fantastical gothic thriller Stoker plays out like an erotic waltz with sinister intentions. As his first English-language film, the acclaimed Korean director has crafted a quiet kind of suspense that shows the graceful unraveling of an isolated American family. 

Stoker tells the tale of a highly intelligent girl, India (played by Mia Wasikowska), after her father dies in an auto accident on her 18th birthday. Following his death, her mysterious yet absolutely charming Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode) comes to stay with her and her unstable mother (Nicole Kidman). India’s questions arise as to the nature of Charlie’s appearance in their lives and although sensing his dark ulterior motives, she becomes infatuated with him, inexplicably drawn to this dark figure who has crept his way into her world.

It’s a story about he inherent nature of evil, as well as the sexual awakening of a young girl when first tempted by the desirable. India’s coming-of-age is the undercurrent for this bone-chilling and stunning feature from Chan-wook and writer-actor Wentworth Miller. Staying true to Park’s strong affinity for character-driven tales and his arresting visual style, Stoker is also enhanced by its biting and beautiful soundtrack from Clint Mansell that acts as its own character in the film.

Yesterday, I got the chance to sit down with Director Park (with the help of his gracious translator) to talk about his attraction to the script, telling a coming of age tale, and gorgeous physicality of his characters.

Director Park, how you first became connected to the film and what drew you to it?
The make-up of this family that is comprised of mother, father, and the only daughter is exactly the same condition as my own family, and that was something that sparked my interest at first. And I liked the quietness of it all, it wasn’t a script where all the characters get all too excited and jump around everywhere; I loved how it was all composed and very quiet.

And did you work with Wentworth on the script to change things and further develop them?
No, there was one big long meeting where a lot of discussion was taking place and it was an opportunity where I could listen to his intentions behind everything that we found on the page and allowed me to retain all the good things about the script without taking away the integrity of the script. I was able to expand those ideas and develop those ideas and delve deeper.

There are so many different layers and genres composed together in the film, but I was drawn very much to India’s sexual awakening throughout the film. Is that something you really wanted to explore, a young girl’s coming of age?
Yes, absolutely. The fact that Stoker is a coming of age story about a young girl, it’s actually an extrapolation or a continuation of the themes I explored in I’m a Cyborg But That’s OK. Also, the fact that I have a daughter that’s exactly the same age as the protagonist, and as a father, that has to be a subject matter that sparked my interest in the first place. And because of this, I actually focused more on this aspect of coming of age and expanded it from what he had found originally in the script. But rather than to say that I was interested in sexual awakening itself, in this film India’s sexual awakening is very much linked to her violent urges and what this has to do with, you know this cathartic feeling of allowing yourself to be drawn to something that’s evil? That’s acutely true of those young girls and boys who are going through their teenage years and he wanted to depict and describe the kind of chaotic state that you go through.

The visual style of the film was so wonderful and added so much to the story. How did you want to create their world through set design and colors and even the way the camera moved that echoed the psychology of the characters.
It’s not easy to explain but when people talk about all this Hitchcockian reference in this film, I am rather bewildered. Whatever influence or reference to Hitchcock Stoker has—the obvious one is Shadow of a Doubt—it was Wenthworth that was really being influenced by that. Although I knew the film had obvious influences from Shadow of a Doubt, the actual film is something I had seen such a long time ago, so exact details of it I have trouble remembering even and that goes the same for all of these other great works by Hitchcock. And if people will say this film feels like it has been influenced by Hitchcock, it’s probably something more fundamental I guess, in that everything you see and hear in a film, it needs to be intended, it needs to be planned, it needs to have significance and this attitude to filmmaking is something I learned from Hitchcock. And because of this, I would go and make a meticulous storyboard for every singe shot in the entire film in the order I would imagine the film to be cut later. So everything is pre-planned this way and how I would use color and how I would visualize this world to speak to the psychological state of each character, it’s part of the process.

Speaking to that meticulous style, there was a great physicality between everyone, it seemed very choreographed—the three of them doing this waltz around each other throughout the house. Was that something that was in the script or more of a directorial decision?
To a certain degree the script described such physicality or choreography, but as I am the one who is going to be directing this film in the end, I had to do my own pass of course. And while doing my own revision of the script to tailor it to become my film, it is something that I was thinking, what could I do with the script and how I could visualize it? And that’s all reflected into what you see now. And I really was thinking of the structure and the design of the house, the space where the dynamic between these three characters would take place. And it’s an interesting dynamic too, it seems to start one way, to be a certain dynamic between two characters and then it switches to being focused on another set of characters between this triangular relationship. So in order to express that, it naturally led to directorial decisions about the physicality or the choreography, which I had to think about even during the stage of revisions.

Image via Fox Searchlight

Attend a Q&A with Director Park Chan-wook For His New Film ‘Stoker’

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Park Chan-wook’s first English-language film, the gripping and fantastical Stoker is a sensual and stirring thriller and not to be missed. The film opens this Friday and as a special treat for audiences in New York, Fox Searchlight has announced that the legendary Korean filmmaker will be present for two of the screenings this weekend and will be doing a Q& A at the Landmark Sunshine theater. For fans of his work, this is a total treat. You can get your tickets now HERE. In the meantime, listen to Clint Mansell’s stunning soundtrack for the film and check back here Friday for our interviews with Park Chan-wook and star Matthew Goode.

Official synopsis:

After India’s (Mia Wasikowska) father dies, her Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode), who she never knew existed, comes to live with her and her unstable mother (Nicole Kidman). She comes to suspect this mysterious, charming man has ulterior motives and becomes increasingly infatuated with him.

BlackBook Exclusive: Listen to Clint Mansell’s Stunning Soundtrack for Park Chan-wook’s ‘Stoker’

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The most fascinating soundtracks provide a gateway into the world of its characters. When a film’s music wraps you in a blanket of sound that allows you to immerse yourself—incorporating the senses and heightening the experience—in a way that fully completes the director’s artistic vision and brings the story to life, that’s when a soundtrack becomes truly memorable. And if there’s anyone who knows understands the importance of symbiosis between filmmaker and composer, it’s the ingenious master of mood, the visionary maestro of cinematic sound, Clint Mansell.

Best known for his work with director Darren Aronofsky, the two have become entwined, creating some of the most amazing amalgamations of sight and sound on film from the paranoid and heartbreakingly hypnotic Requiem for a Dream to the classically disturbed and beautiful Black Swan. “Music is like another character in a film, I think. I’ve heard people say that the best scores are the ones you don’t hear—I think that’s rubbish! Betty Blue, pretty much anything by Morricone or Badalamenti—come on, don’t tell me you never heard those when you were watching the films!” says Mansell, who has now lent his talents to Park Chan-wook’s first English-language film, the fantastical gothic thriller Stoker.

Out February 26 via Milan Records, Stoker: the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack is a sonic pleasure. The 18-song album creates a brilliant emotional/psycholigcal landscape for Chan-Wook’s film, evoking both the bone-chilling feeling a light breath on the back of your neck in the dark and the sensual touch of an erotic waltz on the keys. Bookended by haunting yet delicate monologues about coming into adulthood, the soundtrack transports the listener into the headspace of its characters and the feelings that possess them. Mansell employs his affinity for both industrial and classic sounds to create something entirely arresting and powerful, both other-worldy and tactile.

“I hope the music plays a very important role of enhancing and supporting the story and the characters,” says Mansell, who went on to say that he wanted to “create something elegant and yet powerful and emotional for the score. To capture a young girl blossoming in to adulthood, finding out who she is and what she wants was the challenge.”

sotker

Starring Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, Matthew Goode, and Jacki Weaver, Stoker revolves around India (Wasikowska), a musically inclined girl whose father dies in an car accident on her 18th birthday. After her father’s death, her Uncle Charlie (Goode), who she never knew existed, comes to live with her and her unstable mother (Kidman). Soon after his arrival, India comes to suspect this mysterious and charming man has ulterior motives, but instead of feeling outrage and horror, this friendless girl becomes increasingly infatuated with him.

Described as everything from Hitchcockian in its suspense and Malick-esque in its quiet wonder, the film is also enhanced by the work of iconic composer Philip Glass, whose “Duet” we’ve already gotten a taste of, and Emily Wells’s wonderful “Becomes the Color.” Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazelwood’s “Summer Wine” rounds out the soundtrack to complete its essence of dark corners of the mind and hallowed halls, filtered through an anachronistic sense of delicacy with a sharp bite.

Clint will be performing two shows to support the release of Stoker in New York City on April 3 and 4 at the Church of Saint Paul the Apostle (get your tickets now before this one sells out!) and at The Orpheum in LA on April 6. Stoker creeps into theaters this Friday (3/1), so we’re pleased to share the soundtrack streaming in it’s entirety to get you in the suspense-filled mood of the film. Enjoy.

Check Out a New ‘Stoker’ Featurette and See When It’s Coming to Theaters Near You

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In the past few months, we’ve been getting ourselves excited for Park Chan-wook’s sinister drama, Stoker. And with gorgeous stills, haunting trailers, and pieces of the stunning soundtrack already released to entice us, now there’s a new “Characters” three-minute featurette on the film, giving us a taste of the Stoker family—Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, Matthew Goode, Dermot Mulroney, and Jacki Weaver—who call figure into this dark and sensual thriller. 

We have yet to see an advanced screening of the film but back in January, Variety reported that:

Park’s regular d.p. Chung-hoon Chung appears to be channeling photographer Gregory Crewdson’s eerily high-key Americana in his lighting schemes, while Clint Mansell’s characteristically rich, modernist score is embellished with haunting piano duets composed specifically for the film by Philip Glass. The repeated use of the Lee Hazlewood/Nancy Sinatra number "Summer Wine," meanwhile, is typical of the director’s cockeyed take on American culture. Long may he continue to explore. 

Well! That’s about all I need to hear; I’m in.

The film will be released on March 1st in New York but here’s when and where you can see the film otherwise:

March 1st, 2013
BOSTON, MA
Kendall Square Cinema,
Cambridge,MA

NEW YORK, NY
AMC Lincoln Square 13,
New York, NY

Sunshine Cinemas 5,
New York, NY

TORONTO,
ONVarsity Theatre,
Toronto, ON

LOS ANGELES, CA
The Landmark, Los Angeles, CA
Arclight 15, Hollywood, CA

March 8th, 2013
NEW YORK, NY
AMC Empire 25,
New York, NY

Chelsea Cinemas,
New York, NY

LOS ANGELES, CA
Arclight 16,
Sherman Oaks,
CAUniversity Town Center,
Irvine, CA

March 15th, 2013
ATLANTA, GA
Tara Cinemas,
Atlanta, GA

BOSTON, MA
Embassy 6,
Waltham, MA

BALTIMORE, MD
Charles 5 Theatre,
Baltimore, MD

WASHINGTON, DC
E-Street Cinema,
Washington, DC

DETROIT, MI
Main Art, 
Royal Oak, MI

NEW ORLEANS, LA
Elmwood Palace,
Harahan, LA

Canal Place Theatre,
New Orleans, LA

NEW YORK, NY
Bronxville Triplex,
Bronxville, NY

Manhasset Tri,
Manhasset, NY

Clairidge,
Montclair, NJ

Movies Twin,
Red Bank, NJ

Bethel Cinema,
Bethel, CT

Garden Cinema,
Norwalk, CT

Montgomery Cinemas,
Rocky Hill, NJ

Nitehawk Cinemas,
Brooklyn, NY

Kew Gardens Cinemas,
Kew Gardens, NY

Malverne Cinema,
Malverne, NY

Avon, 
Stamford, CT

BUFFALO, NY
Amherst, Buffalo,  NY

PHILADELPHIA,
PARitz,
Philadelphia, PA

CHARLOTTE, NC
Manor Theatre,
Charlotte, NC

MONTREAL, QC
Cineplex Odeon Forum,
Montreal, QC

CHICAGO, IL
Century Centre Cinema,
Chicago, IL

INDIANAPOLIS, IN
Keystone Art,
Indianapolis, IN

MILWAUKEE,
WIOriental,
Milwaukee, WI

AUSTIN,
TXViolet Crown Cinema,
Austin, TX

Arbor Cinemas,
Austin, TX

DALLAS, TX
Cinemark’s,
Plano, TXA

Angelika Film Center,
Dallas, TX

HOUSTON, TX
River Oaks, Houston, TX

MINNEAPOLIS, MN
Uptown, Minneapolis, MN

ST. LOUIS, MO
Tivoli,
St. Louis, MO

LOS ANGELES, CA
Burbank, Burbank, CA

Rancho Niguel,
Laguna Niguel, CA

Claremont,
Claremont, CA

Laemmle’s,
North Hollywood, CA

Fallbrook,
West Hills, CA

Arclight,
El Segundo, CA

Brea Stadium,
Brea, CA

UA Marketplace,
Long Beach, CA

Westlake Village Twin,
Westlake Village, CA

PALM SPRINGS, CA
Cinemas Palme D’or,
Palm Desert, CA

SAN DIEGO, CA
Hillcrest,
San Diego, CA

SANTA BARBARA, CA
Paseo Nuevo,
Santa Barbara, CA

DENVER, CO
Mayan,
Denver, CO

PHOENIX, AZ
Camelview,
Scottsdale, AZ

SEATTLE, WA
Lincoln Square,
Bellevue, WA

Meridian,
Seattle, WA

Sundance’s, 
Seattle, WA

MONTEREY, CA
Del Mar,
Santa Cruz, CA

PORTLAND, OR
Fox Tower,
Portland, OR

SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Metreon,
San Francisco, CA

Palo Alto Twin,
Palo Alto, CA

Century’s,
Pleasant Hill, CA

Santana Row,
San Jose, CA

Regency,
San Rafael, CA

California 3 Art Theatre,
Berkeley, CA