Anthony Bourdain, Mario Batali Launch 2016 EAT (RED) Culinary Tour

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 31:  Chef Mario Batali attends Infiniti presents the (RED) Supper to launch EAT (RED) DRINK (RED) SAVE LIVES on May 31, 2015 in New York City.  (Photo by Grant Lamos IV/Getty Images for (Red))
Share Button
Mario Batali, Courtesy EAT (RED)

 

If you could eat well and save lives at once, you could hardly say no, could you?

To that end, this year’s edition of the highly anticipated EAT (RED) kicks off June 2 in New York, with the (RED) Supper at Battery Park City’s Brookfield Place, hosted by those ubiquitous, globe-trotting celeb chefs Mario Batali and Anthony Bourdain. Other participating a-list culinary talent for the night will include Dominique Ansel, Frank Falcinelli, Nancy Silverton, Tom Douglas, Vinny Dotolo, Angela Dimayuga, Kristen Kish and Kevin Gillespie.

The overall goal? To raise money for the ongoing (RED) #86AIDS effort, by means of 27 days of edible nirvana. Indeed, the “tour” continues through the 28th, with special dinner, lunch, brunch, happy hour or cocktail events and offerings by many of the world’s hottest epicurean gods and goddesses at their exalted, signature restaurants.

Bourdain_CNN1[1] Eat Red

Anthony Bourdain (Courtesy CNN)

To name but a few: Enrique Olivera at Mexico City’s Eno, Stephanie Izard at Chicago’s Little Goat Diner, Jason Wass at London’s Polpetto, April Bloomfield at NYC’s Spotted Pig, Thomas Keller at the Las Vegas and Beverly Hills Bouchon Bakery locations, Alice Waters at Berkeley’s Chez Panisse, Jose Andres at DC’s Jaleo, as well as Batali and Lidia Bastianich’s own B&BHG Vegas restaurants at the Venetian/Palazzo, including B&B, OTTO Enoteca & Pizzeria and Carnevino Italian Steakhouse—with scores of delectable options to choose from in two dozen cities across four continents.

“Anyone who has ever worked in a kitchen knows that the sum of our efforts always far exceeds what we can do individually,” says Batali. “EAT (RED) is an opportunity for all of our restaurants to collectively contribute to a tremendously worthy cause while doing what we do best: making delicious food.”

LeftBank_GnocciGnocchi at Left Bank NYC, Courtesy EAT (RED)

The (RED) charity, of course, was founded by Bono in 2006, with The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria as its primary recipient. EAT (RED) debuted in 2014, and has become one of its most high-profile annual events. N.B. Plan to reserve in advance. It’s a hot ticket.


Goodnight Mr. Lewis: Will Fleet Week Save Us From Ourselves?

unspecified-5
Share Button
Photos via Fine Young Man productions

The drone of the tattoo gun was a sexy background music to polite conversation. Hipsters, tastemakers and painted ladies enjoyed wonderful concoctions of Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum, while cute sailor boys mingled. One young lad wearing the whitest uniform ever designed turned to the older mariner and lamented, “Chief, I’d love to get a tattoo, but I live with my mother when I’m done.” The older seaman barked at him, saying, “Get it where she won’t see it,” and headed toward the free BBQ.

It was Fleet Week at its best as “The City That Never Sleeps” embraced seaman from all over the world. An old joke wonders about how long Popeye and Bluto have been at sea. It must have been a long time, it goes, because they immediately get it on with a no holds bar fight over what has to be the ugliest gal in the world, Olive Oyl.

At The Sailor Jerry Home Base, open until the 29th, there were no fisticuffs as the boys in white were on their best behavior. They called all the women, “Ma’am,” and all the men, “Sir,” as they hobnobbed with the likes of Rock Photographer Mick Rock, and artists Buff Monster and Hanksy. The free BBQ from Daisy Mays, haircuts from Frank’s Chop Shop and tattoos from Three Kings were provided to thank them for their service.


unspecified-2


You see, Sailor Jerry was a real dude—Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins was in the Navy back in the day before he took the art of tattooing to a different level. I wear his tattoo flash all over my body. It grounds me in old world values and speaks of a time when honor was more important than life itself. Now good ol’ Norman wasn’t what these days we might consider a “perfect” guy. His political views put him a bit to the right of Attila the Hun, but he sure created some classic tattoos. I got one yesterday, a sparrow, which in the old days meant I had traveled 5,000 nautical miles. I may not have done that, but I have been lost at sea and shipwrecked a few times without leaving this island.

As we walked down the streets of the sanitized Times Square it hit me how NYC has changed. Years ago, the sailors would have flocked to the center of our universe looking for love in all the wrong places. Now they just ogle and politely smile. All the politeness is so confusing to me. My daily regime is polka dotted with rudeness and bitter arguments, as this election year seems to have turned us all against each other . Lifelong friends fight over candidate’s shortcomings, as political leanings turn into seemingly religious arguments. On the dating sites I occasionally peruse looking for love in all the wrong places, potential hookups want to know in advance if you stand with this guy or that gal. I can’t imagine, imagining any of the candidates in the bedroom. The campaigns have made all of us idiots in the eyes of those with opposing views. Facebook is a battleground.

Fleet Week and all the polite warriors that have been washed up on our shores have brought us a different set of rules of engagement. Some of us may disagree with the politics of Navies and the military, but there is little argument that these boys and girls in white are standing tall for all of us.

This Sunday everybody’s favorite bad boy from The Walking Dead, Daryl himself, Norman Reedus, will ride up on a custom built Sailor Jerry Harley and make a guest appearance to toast to the troops for all their hard work at the Sailor Jerry Block Party, featuring Cage the Elephant at Hudson River Park’s Pier 84, 12 Avenue and 44th Street. Mr. Reedus will be showing love to the visiting swabbies. I suggest we all bury the hatchets and show them love, too. (Tickets available, here)

Elton John To Auction Off Rare Warhol, Basquiat Collaboration

Warhol Basquiat Untitled
Share Button
Photo via Sotheby’s

After a chance meeting in a New York cafe in 1980, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol went on to conspire on several significant works, until the latter’s untimely death in 1987. One such painting, simply Untitled, will go on the block at the Sotheby’s Paris French Evening sale on June 7.

The current owner of the rather poignantly foreboding artwork (Jean-Michel himself died in 1988), a 1984-1985 acrylic, silkscreen and oil on canvas, signed by both artists on the overlap, is Sir Elton John, along with husband David Furnish. Described as a memento mori—meaning, a cultural reminder of mortality and death’s inevitability—it strikingly exhibits the artistic/psychological frisson and tension that existed between Warhol and Basquiat.

It is expected to fetch upwards of $1,000,000, and the proceeds will likely go to one of the singer’s charitable concerns. Indeed, he and Sotheby’s have a collaborative history of selling off pieces to benefit the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

 

The Row to Open Three-Floor Flagship Store in New York

06-the-row-store
Share Button
Photo via Vogue

Though New Yorkers Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen established The Row’s first flagship store in Los Angeles, it was never their initial intention to move west. A few years back, the two had their sights set on a three-story townhouse at 17 East 71st Street in the Upper East Side, but the preferred location wasn’t yet available. Focused and patient, fashion’s most aloof twins have finally locked in the coveted space with official plans to open The Row’s first New York store.

“This store is coming from two sets of eyes with the same mentality,” Mary-Kate told Vogueexplaining how intimacy and collaboration are at the core of The Row’s brand ethos. While Los Angeles’ store was designed around mid-century homes—glass, water and tress—intimacy, here, manifests as a reflection of New York. “We wanted the store to very much feel like a home—that’s sort of the dream of here: a brownstone in New York,” Ashley added.

Unknown-3Photos via Vogue

With help from French interior designer Jacques Grange, who’s previously worked with Yves Saint Laurent and Valentino, The Row’s New York flagship will be a reflection of the Olsens’ relaxed, elegant collections, dotted with special items, like a Frank Lloyd Wright mirror, Carlo Bugatti chair and Masa Takayama ceramics. Framed by the townhouse’s buttery, neutral color palette, The Row’s new home looks absolutely timeless.

“It was really important for us that when you walk into the store it wasn’t about clothes being shoved in your face,” Ashley said, highlighting the importance of designing a calm, relaxing environment for customers to slowly introduce themselves to the clothes.  “Less is more, I believe.”

New York Celebrates The Whitney’s One-Year Anniversary in Lower Manhattan

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party
Share Button
Photos Courtesy: BFA/Zach Hilty

After leaving its longtime Upper East Side home in 2014, New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art relocated and reopened to Lower Manhattan in May of last year. Following a successful 365-day run in its new Meatpacking District home, the venerated Museum celebrated its one-year anniversary last night with a Studio Party, presented by Louis Vuitton.

The evening event honored Robert J. Hurst, who led the Whitney’s Board of Trustees throughout the Museum’s construction as the chair of the capital campaign. To commemorate Hurst, the Museum’s first floor filled with special guests—iconic photorealist Chuck Close, among them—as everyone sipped custom cocktails and enjoyed small bites.

Zen Freeman and Chelsea Leyland delivered DJ sets, as the crowd lounged in spaces designed by international furniture brand Roche Bobois and received temporary tattoos by Flatlands exhibition artists Nina Chanel Abney, Mathew Cerletty and Jamian Juliano-Villain, as well as Mirror Cells exhibition artists Liz Craft, Elizabeth Jaeger and Maggie Lee.


The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

The Whitney Museum celebrates: the 2016 Annual Art Gala and Studio Party

Drugs, Insanity, Death: The World’s Most Bizarre Museums

Morbid Anatomy Museum 1
Share Button
The Morbid Anatomy Museum

Today, May 18, is International Museum Day—which is really just an excellent reminder that we should make an effort every day to fill our lives with a bit more beauty, peculiarity and enlightenment. But it’s also an opportunity to consider that museums indeed offer so much more than just Damien Hirst, Jackson Pollock and Alexander McQueen. To that end, here are five of the oddest, and perhaps most unsettling of them all. Happy Museum Day:


The Morbid Anatomy Museum, New York

Morbid Anatomy Museum 2

This strange and captivating Brooklyn museum’s mission is stated as “Exploring the intersections of death, beauty and that which falls between the cracks.” It has become a meeting point for NYC’s more funereally disposed artistic souls, as well, hosting lectures, screenings and dark-hearted social gatherings. Its current temporary exhibition is The House of Wax: Anatomical, Pathological, and Ethnographical Waxworks from Castan’s Panopticum (Berlin, 1869-1922). Naturally.


Mütter Museum, Philadelphia

mutter-museum-cr-courtesy

Philly’s rather notorious museum of medical oddities, including historical surgical instruments, corrosion specimens, and the Hyrtl Skull Collection, is genuinely not for the squeamish or sensitive. Its current featured exhibition, Vesalius On The Verge: The Book and The Body, focuses on a series of 16th Century books on human dissection. Creepy.


Museum Dr. Guislain, Ghent, Belgium

Museum Dr Guislain

Joseph Guislain was a forerunner of Freud, the first to posit that mental illness was indeed treatable and that its sufferers were to be cared for with dignity. This singularly fascinating eponymous museum is located in the rather lugubrious former asylum in which he did his groundbreaking work (in one of our favorite European cities, Ghent), and explores insanity and madness from Antiquity through to modern times. A current exhibition, titled Shame, is fairly self explanatory.


Museo De Enervantes, Mexico City

Museo de Enervantes

What the Renaissance is to Florence, so are drug wars to Mexico City. And indeed, this is a museum dedicated to its notorious and storied narco culture. Alongside an arsenal’s worth of seized firearms in display cases, there is an edifying run through the long history of drug abuse itself, and a plaque which commemorates those who have lost their lives battling the brutal cartels (it’s a lot). The museum is technically not open to the public; but call ahead (52 55 2122 8800) and say it’s for, um, educational purposes.


Collection De L’Art Brut, Lausanne, Switzerland

Art Brut Museum

Renowned French painter and sculptor Jean Dubuffet first began assembling and collecting the artworks of the insane in 1945, influenced by Hans Prinzhorn’s seminal text Artistry of the Mentally Ill. Now, of course, the art world lumps it all together as “Outsider Art.” But this collection, located in the glorious Swiss city of Lausanne, is surely the most astonishing and, arguably, the most honest.

The Knocks on NYC’s DJ Scene, Not Producing for Rihanna, and Their New EP

theknocks_justinbridges_blackbook_1
Share Button

The Knocks photographed by Justin Bridges for BlackBook.
JPatt wears leather trainer jacket by Coach. B-Roc wears waxed nylon aviator jacket by Coach. Styled by Alyssa Shapiro.

Ben “B-Roc” Ruttner and James “JPatt” Patterson of The Knocks are overflowing with kinetic energy. Now the producers are making a name for themselves.

Sitting in an East Village townhouse cluttered with art, the guys are as excited to tell their story as we are to hear it. A decade or so of running the DJ scene in downtown New York nightlife, writing for the aforementioned powerhouse performers, and releasing a thread of singles and remixes that have made their Internet presence nothing short of pervasive, Ruttner and Patterson are anxious for the release of their forthcoming EP, So Classic.  We talked to the duo about their humble, sometimes frustrating beginnings, the pros and cons of playing music for New Yorkers, and why their new work finally feels right.

How did you two meet and start playing music together?

B-Roc: We were each producers in our own right, making mainly Hip Hop music at the time — like in high school and early college days. We met through a mutual friend actually when I went to the New School, because JPatt had a friend that went there. At that point, we were both kind of new to being in New York City a lot and kind of just played each other beats and sent stuff back and forth on the Internet, stuff like that, just to kind of see what we were working on. And then we both needed roommates, so we moved into an apartment together in the East Village, actually Avenue C. We were still doing our own thing in our own rooms and slowly started to kind of work on projects together. The stuff that we were making was really cool and ended up taking off a little bit.

So you guys could literally hear what the other was working on through the walls?

B-Roc: Yeah, that’s actually how we got the name The Knocks. Because we used to have like a shitty little apartment where the walls were paper-thin and we each had studio-sized speakers in our rooms. We’d each be making beats really loudly and the neighbors would knock on the walls and the ceilings, and we called them “the knocks.” I’d be like, “I got the knocks. I have to stop playing.” I’d turn my speakers off and I’d go into his room basically until he got the knocks.

What kind of work were the two of you doing at the time?

JPatt: I think we were both at the time writing a lot of stuff for other people. We were doing the whole kind of L.A. base producer thing where they’re all sort of aiming for the same Pop record. And it’s kind of unfulfilling work in that you’re not really making anything that’s real, like that comes from any sort of real place. So I feel like we’re both artists…we both love what we do before…I mean we both want to make money off of it obviously, but at least for me I like the fulfillment of the music we make and being appreciated. Like, it coming from somewhere where someone can appreciate what I do, because it is me. So we were kind of like, fuck that. It was kind of an accident, we were just joking around, like jokingly made this dancer called “Can’t Shake Your Love” in our production room of our studio, not even in the main room.

B-Roc: This is like 2008 or 2009. The EDM thing hadn’t really hit.

JPatt: We did that and we literally just threw it up online to some bloggers that we knew and got the most feedback or like the best response of anything we had done up until that point. So then we were like, “Maybe we’re onto something.”

theknocks_justinbridges_blackbook_2
The Knocks photographed by Justin Bridges for BlackBook

You guys have both been members of New York’s downtown music scene for a while. How has this affected your sound or style?

JPatt: We were both DJs, so we would go out and test stuff in the clubs, or see what people are reacting to so that when we get back into the studio, we could kind of just put that into our music and what we’re aiming for as far as  vibe, if we want to really get the crowd’s reaction. The New York scene is like the scene in my opinion, so it helps to be involved in it in that way.

Do you think it’s the scene for just music or for basically everything artistic?

JPatt: For music especially, because we do music, but really for everything. Like if you ask me, I feel like New York is the place to be but especially for the music, because there’s every kind of scene here and there are open format gigs where you have to play every kind of music in a three hour span, and a lot of DJs are House DJs or Hip Hop DJs, or ‘whatever’ DJs. You have to play to every kind of person while keeping the crowd unified. It’s a really unique skill set.

B-Roc: I think it comes through in our music. You can’t listen to our music and be like, “Oh, they’re a House duo,” or whatever. You can hear a lot of influence from Hip Hop and you can hear a lot of influence from old Soul, and Classic Rock even. That’s kind of what we aim for. It’s like, we don’t corner ourselves …even when I met him, he wasn’t even DJing yet. It was my day job. I was DJing five nights a week at like all those clubs, whether it was like 1Oak or Darby, all those crappy bottle places, and you have to be on your toes and be able to mix a U2 record into a Jay-Z song, and I think seeing reactions and when people react to different parts of it, like “Oh this part of this U2 song always goes off so big in the club, and then this part of that Daft Punk song…” so were always in the studio using that. We’re like, “Oh, this breakdown sounds like Fleetwood Mac versus this breakdown, which sounds like Frankie Knuckles.”

It must be a great tool to be able to so regularly gauge how a live audience is reacting to you music.

B-Roc: At the same time it can be dangerous though, because New York is such a bubble. But it’s almost like running with weights on because New York audiences are even harder in a sense where they’ll just sit there and stare and then you’ll go do the same thing in Boston and everyone will be like, “Woah!” and freak out because they don’t see it all the time. In New York, everyone’s like, “I could go see this show or I could go see this other guy here.” There’s so much shit going on.

As you said, you guys used to be a part of that base producer songwriting process. Contrarily, you’ve fully collaborated with and helped to develop certain artists, like Alex Winston. Can you expand on that?

B-Roc: That’s how we started and that’s what we wanted to do. Like, we had this kid who got signed to Columbia Records at one point and then Winston…she was making us work on music and we made her move to New York and started producing this other kind of stuff for her…But then The Knocks stuff got so busy, and you can’t really balance it all; you have to focus.

But now that our album’s done I can definitely see us going back and doing more of that, but also our album is very collaborative. Like even when it was just production stuff, we worked with a lot of other producers, and whether it’s guitar players, horn players, musicians…Phoebe [Ryan] is featured on our album. We worked with a lot of artists like that. Most of the features are not just guys that we call up and pay. It’s basically people that we know through the scene here and friends, which always ends up being the best songs. Like “Classic” was totally just a collab with a friend. That song “Comfortable,” which is one of our bigger songs, was just a collab with our friend from X Ambassadors. Because we always kind of feel like underdogs. We’ve never been put in the studio with anyone huge, or it’s rare that we get thrown in with massive guys, so we kind of try to create our own path.

How does this type of collaborative work compare to what you were doing before?

JPatt: I didn’t mean writing with other people is unfulfilling. I meant there is like a specific style. It’s like, “So-and-so, a huge artist, needs a record. They want it to sound like these other five records. Go.” And then they send that call sheet out to like a million different producers and everyone sends in what they think will work, and then they end up going with Dr. Luke. That’s the kind of production work we were trying to get away from.

B-Roc: They’d be like, “We need a song like Britney Spears meets Courtney Love meets the Ying Yang Twins,” and you’re like, “What are you talking about?” I mean yeah, it looks good on paper, but it’s not the way music works.

Do you ever feel that people within the industry are trying to force a certain image onto The Knocks, or classify you in an inorganic way?

JPatt: For a while we were on this other label, I won’t even name any names, but we were on a label for a sec that was a little like the nightmare stories that you hear about labels, where they’re like, “You know, we like what you do, but why don’t you try this other thing that isn’t anything like what you do, at all?” It was just a constant struggle trying to prove our points to them. It was just a bunch of older guys who had no connection to current pop culture and just like hear the radio on the way to work and are like, “Oh, this is what kids are listening to.” And that’s what they try to force you into. So we were there for a second but luckily we were able to get out of that with a clean break. So, yeah, it’s hard for us to be put into those sorts of boxes.

B-Roc: [And that’s because] we already kind of built it up. And I’m super hands-on with administrative things, like the artwork and direction of stuff like that. I think as long as you know what you want and you have something secure…like working with a label like Atlantic’s been amazing because they just want to amplify it. They saw us already as a packaged thing, like they saw what we were already doing, and were like, “Yeah, we love this. Let’s just make it even bigger.”

Then in terms of your real style and appearance, what are you guys into?

JPatt: I like vintage stuff. I like old stuff. LPM is one of my favorite stores to go to. And I like the ‘90s era vintage, graphic cartoon tees, and troop jackets, and stuff like that. Mostly dark colors.

B-Roc: I’m into vintage stuff also. I’m a little bit more into the rocker side of things, all the ‘90s grunge, and I grew up as a punk rocker in middle school. That was my whole thing, so it’s funny to now come back [to that]. I wish I had a lot of those old clothes I wore, but I got rid of all of them for like, my Rocawear suits in high school (laughs). I’m big on leather jackets, and I have a vintage Marilyn Manson tee that’s like my favorite shirt of all time.

Can you tell me about the new EP?

B-Roc: The EP is a taste of what we have to come with the album. It definitely is a new sound, but at the same time we feel like it’s finally the right sound. We feel like, you know, a lot of these bands nowadays with the Internet, like you put out a song and overnight it gets big and all of a sudden we’re playing these shows. And we we’re touring with only having like, four songs, and we had to play a lot of live remixes because we didn’t have enough material. I felt like these past five or whatever years that we’ve been on the road a lot and just running around, we haven’t had time to really sit down and develop our sound. We’d just kind of been running with whatever we were doing. And it just felt like over this time, slowly, we’ve been building, and like when we made “Classic” and a couple of these other new songs, everything seemed to kind of click in this way that was like, “Okay, now this is what we’ve been meant to make.”

JPatt: It’s a good showcase of everything that we’ve been through up until now, and everything we’ve learned, all of our influences, you can really hear them and it’s not like muddy in that it’s two-layered.

How does this work feel to you compared to what you used to produce?

JPatt: It doesn’t feel forced at all. Like even with the old label, by the end, we had reached sort of a weird compromise with them and then they folded, but even with the music that we made in lieu of that compromise, still to me felt a little bit forced, like we were trying to please someone else.

B-Roc: It feels right, and it feels good to have that. Because we definitely had a whole album done that was like cool and a good album but like I feel way better about this one. When we were with the last label, we scrapped a whole album and went and made a whole new record, and it was such a blessing in disguise because we’re super proud of this, and it just feels like something that no one’s ever done before.

Grooming by Ashley Rebecca

What to Wear to Frieze: How to Dress Like Your Favorite Nan Goldin Photo

nangoldin_frieze_blackbook
Share Button

Nan Goldin, French Chris at the drive-in, N.J., 1979. Cibachrome 30×40 inches. ©Nan Goldin, Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery

Let’s dissect the aesthetics at work, because for the fashion gal wondering what to wear to Frieze, there’s no dedication quite like matching the artwork. To get the Nan Goldin look, come right this way…

Nothing quite says freedom!!! like a convertible, a pair of Candies and a tube top. Grab a can of beer and pair those otherwise un-recommendables with cropped flared denim to keep it current. Et voila — it’s like you’re at the drive-in in Jersey, hanging out in the back of the car with the top down. May we recommend some double stick tape so you don’t also end up with your top down?

See Nan Goldin’s French Chris at the Drive-In, N.J. featuring the artists’s oft photographed friends French Chris and Cookie Mueller, and more of the artist’s work at the Matthew Marks Gallery booth B53 at the Frieze New York art fair on Randall’s Island from May 14-17.

nangoldin_frieze_blackbook
Clockwise from top left: Dolce & Gabbanna embellished leather sandals; Marc Jacobs ribbed-knit bandeau top; Rick Owens tie dyed denim tunic; Day Birgeret Mikkelsen plisse bandeau top; Sophia Webster Ava polka dot metallic leather sandals; No.6 Store Nubuck sandals

nangoldin_frieze_blackbook_denim
From left: Rachel Comey legion wide-leg cropped jeans; J.Crew Rayner high-rise wide-leg jeans; Valentino high-rise wide-leg jeans

Art to See Right Now in New York

Share Button

Spoke Art presents their sixth annual Wes Anderson art exhibit, “Bad Dads”—a group show of over 70 artists interpreting the oeuvre of auteur Wes Anderson. On view August 7-9 at the Joseph Gross Gallery, 548 W 28th St.

19590953105_46873fcef2_z

Courtesy Spoke Art.

 

“Space Between” features cross-generational artists whose works in contemporary abstraction investigate the seams, tears, and edges between two and three dimensions. Investigating the legacy of abstraction in Western art, the group show uses Ellsworth Kelly as a jumping off point. Through August 14 at The FLAG Art Foundation, 545 West 25th Street, 9th Floor.

Rebecca-Ward-e1432743513332

Rebecca Ward, clandestine, 2015, courtesy The FLAG Art Foundation

 

Greene Naftali presents their first solo exhibition of new work by Michael Smith, a seminal video, performance, and installation artist. Excuse me!?!…I’m looking for the “Fountain of Youth” engages the tragicomic aspects of American culture and the art world, teasing out facets of loneliness, consumerism, and the personal measures of success and failure in each. Through August 14. 508 West 26th Street.    

f4de46a1a19891f03bb25b7e7b4e13ef

Installation view courtesy Greene Naftali.

 

Brian Leo Is Not A Zombie Formalist displays small canvases in his unique “Garage Pop Surrealism” style, combining brightly-colored images with clever and sometimes poignant social and political commentary. Through August 31. Amy Li Projects, 166 Mott Street.

353d25a193116a4f0bc4035c40adf62b

Courtesy Amy Li Projects.

 

Marcel Dazma and Paddle8 have organized an exhibit of artwork donated on behalf of an auction to benefit 826NYC, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting students creative writing skills. The group show includes works from 40+ renowned artists, on view at David Zwirner through July 31. 537 West 20th Street. 

Dzama -bbook

 

Miss Death Disco, 2014, Marcel Dzama. Courtesy of David Zwirner

David Zwirner presents its third exhibition of Richard Serra’s work. Richard Serra: Equal is an installation comprised of Serra’s immense, forged weatherproof steel works. Towering over the viewers, the sculptures are breathtaking. On display through July 24. 537 West 20th Street.

Serra_BBook

Installation view, Richard Serra: Equal, courtesy of David Zwirner

Make art, not pipelines: Get in on the Ground Floor. See works by Dan Flavin and Donald Judd (including art, books and furniture), and get a glimpse of how Judd lived at the Judd Foundation, 101 Spring Street, the late artist’s Soho home. The foundation opens to the public from 1-5:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, starting this Friday, June 12. This exhibition runs through September 19.
danflavin_juddfoundation
Installation view of Dan Flavin, untitled (to Bob and Pat Rohm), 1969. Photo by @alyssashapir

303 Gallery presents their first solo exhibition of new works by Kim Gordon. The collection, Design Office: The City is a Garden, is inspired by the dramatic changes in the New York City landscape over the past years. This exhibit runs June 4 through July 24, 2015. 507 W 24th Street.

Kim Gordon

The City is a Garden, 2015, Kim Gordon. Courtesy of 303 Gallery

Jack Shainman Gallery is presenting their second solo show with artist Yoan Capote, Collective Unconscious, through July 10th. Capote’s work investigates the way shared social experiences have an effect on the individual throughout history. 524 W 24th Street.

Yoan Capote

Gallery view courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery

Jack Shainman presents El Anatsui‘s Five Decades, a survey of the artists’s work. Anatsui recently won the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement a the Venice Biennale. On view from May 17 through September 26, 2015. 25 Broad Street, Kinderhook, New York.
elanatsui_blackbook
Gallery view courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery

MoMa PS1 presents a Math Bass solo exhibition, Off the Clock, featuring sculptures, paintings, and Bass’s new video Drummer Boi. On display from May 3 through August 31, 2015. 22-25 Jackson Ave, Long Island City, NY.
mathbass_blackbook
Courtesy of Math Bass

Richard Serra’s Equal, an installation forged in weatherproof steel, opens at David Zwirner Gallery. Open from April 29 through July 24, 2015. 537 West 20th Street, New York, NY.
Walkthrough_-600x600

In “How We See,” Laurie Simmons draws inspiration from “Doll Girls,” women who utilize cosmetics, clothes, and surgeries to attain a baby doll, anime, or Barbie-like look. Her photographs, on view at the Jewish Museum, feature portraits of models seated in front of curtains, each with her own set of sparkling, oversized, drawn on eyes. March 13 through August 9, 2015. 1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY.

LaurieSimmons_BlackBook
Ajak (Violet), 2015, Laurie Simmons. Courtesy of the Jewish Museum.

See Gustav Klimt‘s much adored Adele Bloch-Bauer I, a portrait done in oil paint, gold, and silver, among many other works by the artist, on view at Neue Galerie from April 2 through September 7, 2015. 1048 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY.
GustavKlimt_BlackBook
Adele Bloch-Bauer I, 1907, Gustav Klimt. Courtesy of Neue Galerie.

Visit MoMA for a further look at Gustav Klimt‘s muse and patron in his second portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer. Ongoinog. 11 West 53rd Street, New York.
112368
Gustav Klimt, Adele Bloch-Bauer II. 1912. Private collection copyright The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Jonathan Muzikar