New Brooklyn Exhibition Celebrates Nicole Richie, Paris Hilton & Lindsay Lohan

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We know you’re obsessed with the Olsen twins, Lindsay Lohan, and this video of Kim Cattrall scatting. But you’re probably not as obsessed as Matt Harkins and Viviana Olen—they started a museum about it.

The pair have created exhibitions about all of the above, as well as, currently, Nicole Richie’s infamous 2007 Memorial Day Barbeque, which they curated in collaboration with popular Tumblr, Pop Culture Died in 2009. For their first show, the duo presented a gallery of images and memorabilia surrounding the Winter Olympic Games of 1994, where world-class figure skate Tonya Harding attacked her rival, Nancy Kerrigan.

While it may not be the Met (yet), the creators of the THNK 1994 (Tony Harding Nancy Kerrigan 1994) Museum have evolved a wall in their living room dedicated to their favorite athletes into a permanent, fully-realized exhibition space dedicated to showcasing and selling the artwork of female and LGBTQ artists.

The museum is located at 1436 Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, and open from 12-7 PM Wednesdays through Sundays. In addition to their exhibitions, they hold live events that (we can confirm) are always incredible: they’ve had panel discussions on Britney Spears, for instance, as well as screenings of 9 To 5 and Moana. 

We sat down with the curatorial duo to find out the story of how this fabulously strange gallery space came to be.

How’d you two find each other?

Viviana  Matt and I met through Upright Citizens Brigade. We were both comedians there, and then we met at a party and just decided to be friends. When we decided to start working together, we weren’t really doing UCB as much anymore, and we were both just feeling a little lost. But we started hanging out, and we were having a lot of fun, he’d come over, we’d watch Real Housewives, we’d swipe on Tinder… it was just heaven.

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How did the idea to make a museum together form?

Viviana  We decided to move in together. The first apartment we looked at we took—it was in Williamsburg, and we thought, “Oh, there are a lot of hot guys in Williamsburg.” It was a tiny apartment. It felt like a boat. But there was a 25-foot long hallway instead of a living room, and we thought, “Oh, we have to do something with this hallway.” And Matt’s friend came over and told us we looked like serial killers and needed to put some art on the walls. But it was winter, and neither of us had boyfriends, so we watched a lot of movies. We watched that Netflix documentary, The Price of Gold, about Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan at the 1994 Winter Games. We just couldn’t stop talking about it, and it was at a time in Netflix where no one was watching anything at the same time, so no one else seemed to care about it. So we decided to make a museum. If it had happened today, there would have been a million think pieces about it.

How did people initially react when they heard about the Tonya and Nancy exhibit?

Matt  People would say, “You’re so cynical,” or “This is a joke, right?” But then we explain “No,” and go into this long detailed background of the story we’re exhibiting.
Viviana  In retrospect, of course there was a huge figure skating community who felt like this story kind of belonged to them. And we began talking to people who were there at the time—reporters, and people who made art. And we’d meet people and they’d give us artifacts—a woman gave us a pin from the Championship where it happened. We got press passes from where the attack happened. We got all these things that were really important, so it went from, “Oh, we’re going to blow up pictures of Tonya and Nancy and be cute” to “Oh, we have these very real things, people are excited about it, people want to come. Let’s make this as nice as possible.” We let strangers into our house, but it wasn’t scary, because if you’re going to a figure skating museum, there’s someone you can hang out with. You know? We’ve met so many great people. No matter the exhibit, it’s always so fun to meet people in real life, off the internet. It’s a muscle you don’t flex unless you have to.

How did you guys end up in the physical museum space, then?

Matt  We were on our way to meet this artist, who has a painting of Naomi Campbell in the show right now, of her in her outfit doing community service. No one got a bad photo of her—she wore gowns. And on the way we passed this place, and it looked splendid, and we’d already been talking about doing some more exhibits, and trying to find a permanent space that would allow us to do that.
Viviana  If you do a pop-up, like we did for the “Olsen Twins” one, you spend, like, $2,500 for two weeks. So we were trying to be more economical.

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How did this show come about? 

Viviana We’ve known about him for awhile. We’re huge fans. He’s so smart, and just a fabulous curator. He had reblogged one of our “Olsen Twins Hiding From the Paparazzi” images from our show last year, and so we started following each other. Then for our “Yamma Kippi Yaybo” exhibit, I think he came by for one of those events, and we approached him about doing something. We’ve been working on lining up shows for the whole year, and we wanted to do something with him about the 2000s. So we decided to do a series about scandal, beginning with Winona, and being caught shoplifting. When social media became bigger, tabloid culture kind of died down, because you could hear things straight from celebrities’ mouths.

How do you get in touch with the artists you choose to use for your exhibits? 

Viviana  When we launched our first exhibit—about Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan—and we did a Kickstarter, a bunch of artists reached out to us then. A lot of them we still haven’t actually met to this day, like Heather Rohnert, who does all of our calligraphy. We’ll find people who like what we do, and are doing something similar. That’s how we met Laura Collins—she already had a drawing of Tonya Harding. Then we saw that she had all these paintings of the Olsen twins hiding from the paparazzi, and we were like, “Woah, what is this?” And she said she was doing a series. We said, “These should be in a museum!” And then we realized we had a museum. That was a really cool partnership to form with her—we actually represent her now.

What other plans do you have for upcoming exhibits?

Matt  After this one, we have “Real Housewives Pointing Fingers,” and then after that, we’re working on the times between exhibits, when we’re sending out all the pieces that sold to whomever bought them. So we’re thinking between exhibits we want to open the space to local artists, to show their work in.
Viviana  We’ll find something that speaks to us—like the “Yamma Kippi Yaybo” exhibit—so we’re now waiting for things to come to us. We’ll watch a movie at 2 AM and be like, “Oh my god this!” So we have a lot of TV to watch.

What are your favorite TV shows to binge?

Viviana  We are well-versed in the Housewives universe, from start to finish, every location. We feel like the Dallas one is really underappreciated, and it’s a good one to jump on to, because it’s only in its second season.
Matt  It’s a really good season. There’s a carnie, who was raised in a carnival, and her tagline is “You don’t mess with a carnie.” But terrible stuff happened to her at the carnival.

Have any of the celebrities you’ve done exhibits about acknowledged the show?

Viviana  During the Olsen twins one—this was before Postmates was big—we were at the space, and we tweeted “Somebody bring us some Frappuccinos. And 30 minutes later, a courier came. And he had two mocha Frappuccinos for us. And he wouldn’t tell us who it’s from. Now, I don’t know who has courier money other than the Olsen twins.

What are your ultimate curatorial aspirations?

Matt  Well, what we love about the space is it really is an unhinged madhouse of people coming, and having conversations about Tonya Harding, Nicole Richie and Lindsay Lohan. So we’d love to keep doing shows about specific topics—with a lot of these, you’re trained to have a defensive way of reacting to it, or apologizing for the fact that you love it. But there’s no need. You’re preparing for it to be called stupid, when it’s like, “I know it’s stupid. And I like it.”
Viviana  Yeah, like, “It makes me happy. Is that not enough for you? I have to hate myself for liking something?”
Matt  So we want to have a space where people feel comfortable to come and talk about these things. We’re more than down at any time to have a real, in-depth conversation about Britney Spears.
Viviana  We just had a Britney Spears panel, and so many people came who we didn’t know, from all corners of New York. It got emotional, like group therapy—people talked about what Britney meant to them, and how she helped them, and we all listened to music. It didn’t matter how many followers you had, or anything like that. It was spiritual, like church.

What’s the permanent collection like?

Matt  We built up some of our old exhibits in the back, yeah. We’ve got the whole Tonya Nancy exhibit up, and bits and pieces of the others.
Viviana  We love the space. It looks like if Jennifer Aniston were playing a travel writer in a rom com—the place where she would live.

THNK 1994’s current exhibit, Nicole Richie’s 2007 Memorial Day BBQ, runs through August 11. Their next exhibit, Real Housewives Pointing, opens in October.

Top Summer Reading: 4 Titles to Throw in Your Backpack

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Bright, Precious Days by Jay McInerney

There are many great chroniclers of New York City, but among the best must be ranked Jay McInerney, if for no other reason than his masterpiece, Bright Lights, Big City, published to instant acclaim when he was just 29. That novel, told in the second person, threw us full tilt into the world of 80s New York. It was moving, evocative, and thrilling. Wisely, McInerney is still writing about the city he knows best, and Bright, Precious Days touches on the themes that have animated him since the 1980s: money, failure, self-doubt, and the pursuit of happiness. The third in a trilogy that began 25 years ago, with Brightness Falls, his latest takes up the story of Russell and Corrine Calloway as they navigate mid-life in the wake of the 2008 financial crash. Not unlike McInerney’s own life, much of it revolves around book parties, art shows, restaurants, and weekends in the Hamptons, suffused with ennui and nostalgia. More portrait than plot, Bright, Precious Days shows that McInerney is still the master of capturing that particular New York sense of falling and failing, all other evidence to the contrary. Vintage, $16.95


Between East and West: Across the Borderlands of Europe by Anne Applebaum

First published in 1994, this travelogue by the journalist Anne Applebaum now reads as history. Much of the world she recorded on her journey from Kaliningrad to Odessa in the fall of 1991 would alter beyond recognition as the Soviet Union collapsed and civil wars sprung up across the Balkans. As she points out in her new introduction, the isolated village of Bieniakonie in Belarus now has its own website, “but when I turned up there in 1991, people stopped in the street to stare at me.” Anchor Books, $17.95

 


The Hue and Cry at Our House by Benjamin Taylor

By all accounts Taylor should not have survived birth—his mother had lost two babies before him. The miracle of surgery ensured his survival, but childhood was not easy —even before he knew he was gay. When he was six his parents took him to his first psychiatrist, but his struggles remained.   “I spilled food at every meal,” he writes. “At roller-skating parties I posed a clear and present danger. My obsessive concern was to memorize everything.” He was, he says, “fully equipped—a boy with asthma, homosexuality and what would later be called Asperger’s Syndrome.” The book’s conceit is Taylor’s recollection of shaking JFK’s hand, hours before he was assassinated in Dallas, but that lucid and poignant memory is just a jumping off point for a gorgeously elegiac series of recollections and observations about life and time and friendship. Taylor can write like an angel, and his memoir could be three times as long and still not overstay its welcome. Penguin Books, $16


Swimming in the Sink by Lynne Cox

How exhilarating to be the first to achieve something remarkable. Lynne Cox, the long distance swimmer from Boston, has done so over and over again. She was the first to cross the Straits of Magellan in Chile, the first to swim around the cape of Good Hope in South Africa, and the first woman to swim the 16 kilometers of the Cook Strait in New Zealand, where the water temperature is 50f. Perhaps most famously, in 1987, she swum from the United States to the Soviet Union across the Bering Straits, winning an accolade from the Soviet president, Mikhail Gorbachev. Such extreme conditions can take their toll. In 2012, Cox developed an irregular heartbeat and severe cramping in both hands. Doctors suggested she might need a heart transplant. Determined to avoid that drastic scenario, Cox focuses on her diet, her state of mind, and her friendships, gradually healing herself in the process. “The day I learned I might lose my heart, I started talking to it, and the conversation has never stopped,” she writes. “We still had great things we would do together, and I wanted to do them wholeheartedly.” Vintage, $16

 

Norwegian Air is Bringing Back the Great European Vacation

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Photo courtesy of This is Edinburgh

If you need to know why Norwegian Air has just been named the ‘World’s Best Low-Cost Long-Haul Airline’ for the third consecutive year (and the ‘Best Low-Cost Airline in Europe’ for the fifth year in a row) look no further than how it disrupts the way other major airlines operate.

In May, American Airlines, rapidly becoming the nation’s choice of last resort, announced that it would yet again add more seats to planes, reducing the space between rows by one to two inches depending on where you sit. This is not much more than Spirit Airlines, but without Spirit’s steep discounts. “It’s less legroom and more uncomfortable seats,” travel blogger Gary Leff told The New York Times last month, explaining how more seats mean less padding. That’s another reason why your ass feels so sore after flying AA. And with less room to tilt your seat, your back will feel sore, too. By contrast, the seat pitch on Norwegian is a 31″-32″, about the same as Delta.

A view from Calton Hill (Photo courtesy of Visit Britain)

But the real disruption is the way Norwegian has figured out how to lower costs—such as utilizing smaller regional airports like Providence, RI, or Stewart International in New York’s Hudson Valley, where landing fees are about ten times lower than at LaGuardia in Queens. For those willing to take the new Stewart Airport Express, a direct coach service to Port Authority Bus Terminal in midtown Manhattan (approx. 90 minutes), or drive, the prices to fly direct to cities like Edinburgh at the height of summer are jaw-droppingly competitive.

Round trips have been promoted for as low as $300, and can still be purchased for around $500—in August. A round-trip, non-stop on American to Edinburgh or Dublin, by contrast, will set you back $1,271.

And that’s not all. Norwegian plans to launch direct flights from Newark and Los Angeles to Rome in November, as well as a twice-weekly nonstop service to Guadeloupe and Martinique from Providence’s T. F. Green Airport for those seeking some winter sun.

Naturally, the country’s flagship airlines are feeling the heat. As they continue to make money from new fees without cutting prices, Norwegian Air is offering a new alternative to passengers that are tired of getting so little in return for giving up so much. Can it last? We hope so, though airlines have been known to crush this kind of uprising before.

Vetements Hosts S/S 18 ‘No Show’ In A Parking Lot

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Photo: Demna Gvasalia/ @Vetements_Official on Instagram

Always one to buck convention, Demna Gvasalia’s S/S 18 show for Vetements was not a runway show at all, but rather a gallery of lifesize lookbook photos presented in, naturally, a multi-story parking lot.

The models? Random people plucked off the streets: young, old, and even entire families. It’s a relatively expected move for Gvasalia and his anti-brand; poking fun at the highbrow, nose-in-the-air world of Paris Fashion Week, though that’s not to say the regular shows fit into any sort of mold (see: sky-high scaffolding and Gvasalia’s fashion dads).

As for the clothing, the looks were reflections on Vetements past, with some fine tuning. There were the typical spandex boots, chunky heels, funky T-shirts, baggy dresses, shirts, and jackets: normcore at its most expensive.

“I wanted to go back and perfect things we did in former seasons. It’s kind of a best of, I suppose. And I felt quite liberated by that,” Gvasalia told Vogue.

And in an even more interesting twist, models picked out their own looks for the presentation, and Gvasalia himself took the pictures.

“What you see is what each person chose to wear themselves,” Gvasalia continued. “Everyone is choosy about what they want to wear; it was quite a big project with a huge range of clothes. And I showed everyone their photographs to be sure they liked them.”

Take a look at some of our picks for best looks below:

VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2018

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VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2018

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VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2018

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VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2018

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VETEMENTS SPRING-SUMMER 2018

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Ken’s New Fashion Chapter Includes a…Man Bun

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We’ve all known Ken to be a pioneer in the fashion industry since his birth in 1961 from the plastic womb of Mattel. Over the years, he’s been retro…

Courtesy of Mattel (1961).

He’s been avent garde…

Courtesy of Mattel (Ken by Gareth Pugh).

He’s been a whole host of things:

Courtesy of Mattel.

Now, it’s with great pleasure we introduce Ken’s next chapter in his ongoing fashion evolution: a Brooklyn hipster sporting his inevitable man bun:

Courtesy of Mattel.

He’s part of the “New Crew,” a new collection of Barbies and Kens recently unveiled by the toy titan. The New Crew has 15 new dolls, in 3 different body types, with 5 different ethnicities of dear Kenneth. Here’s the whole New Crew:

Courtesy of Mattel.

As the new line drops, so too does the news that an exhibition of the best of vintage Ken, including that fantastic Gareth Pugh version, will go up this Friday at the London-based store Machine-A, Dazed reports.

It’s important to keep a few things in mind as you continue with the rest of your day:

 

The New American Road Trip: Loose in the Borscht Belt

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Illustration by Emma Dibben

The blink-and-you’ll-miss-them river communities on Route 97, along the eastern bank of the Delaware River, have seen good times and bad, but an influx of exurbanites from Brooklyn is breathing new life into faded lumber towns like Barryville and Narrowsburg. In summer and fall, especially, the road from Port Jervis to Callicoon is a seductive jaunt that clings lovingly to the Delaware for most of the 45-mile journey, before the river vistas give way to tumbledown farms and picture-perfect woods.

Start: Port Jervis, N.Y.

End: Catskill Park

Total distance: 100 miles

Suggested length: 2–5 days

1) Foundry 42, Port Jervis

It’s taken a long time, but finally there are signs of “reJervination,” to use Cooper Boone’s phrase, in this old industrial town 90 miles northwest of New York. Boone, a clinical psychologist, singer-songwriter, and foodie, is the kind of local pioneer who sees an opportunity and runs to it. His new venture, Foundry 42+, occupying a two-story 1940 building with tin ceilings, is a miniature ABC Carpet & Home, with bespoke furniture, antiques, grooming products (created by Boone’s husband, Mark Veeder), a café serving local bakes, and—most importantly—hand-made unicorns. Find more info here.

Left: Exterior of Foundry 42. Right: Inside Foundry 42. (Photos courtesy of Foundry 42)

2) Stickett Inn, Barryville

Owners Roswell Hamrick and Johnny Pizzolato have turned this former canal house into an eclectic Aladdin’s den of whimsical art and woodsy comforts. Each of the fours suites is themed—Soak, Drink, Eat, and Steam—so choose your poison wisely. We like the spacious trough tub in Soak, but if you’re in the mood to party, Drink comes with a wet bar. For a gentle hike, the town is close to the Minisink Battle Ground, a half-mile trail commemorating American soldiers who perished in a 1779 raid lead by Joseph Brant, a Mohawk colonel in the British Army. Find more info here.

3) Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, Lackawaxen

Though John Roebling is best known for building the Brooklyn Bridge, this Roebling-designed crossing at the hamlet of Lackawaxen is the oldest wire suspension bridge in the United States. Built in 1847 to connect the two parts of the sadly-defunct Delaware & Hudson Canal, it’s now just a regular road bridge, while still retaining its original appearance. Cross to the other side to find the house, now a small museum, where the western author Zane Grey lived from 1905 to 1918.

4) Tusten Mountain Trail

Midway between Barryville and Narrowsburg, the Tusten Mountain Trail is a three-mile loop of pristine woods overlooking the river. Hike through eastern hemlocks and white pines, and in spring, a plethora of wildflowers including violets, red columbines, and pink lady’s slippers. Find more info here.

5) The Heron and The Laundrette, Narrowsburg

Sitting at the narrowest point of the Delaware River (hence its name), Narrowsburg is a happy hunting ground for birders scanning the skies for bald eagles, especially in winter and early spring before the tree canopy grows back. In summer, scramble down the river bank under the bridge and swim off the large flat boulder before hitting one of the town’s bustling restaurants: The Heron, on Main Street, for comfort classics like buttermilk-fried local chicken, or The Laundrette, for inventive pizzas baked in an imported Italian wood-fired oven. Wash them down with a New York Sour on the outdoor terrace with its stunning river views.

Left: The patio at the Laundrette. Right: A pastry and latte at the Laundrette. (Photos courtesy of the Laundrette)

6) Nine River Road, Callicoon

With its wide main street straddling the railway line and the imposing mansard roof of the Western Hotel, Callicoon could be the setting of a Zane Grey novel (see #3) if a tumult of new ventures hadn’t blown away the tumbleweeds. Building on their success with boutique hotels in nearby Livingston Manor and Long East Branch, Sims Foster and Kirsten Harlow Foster have brought their cozy aesthetic to Callicoon with the eight-room Nine River Road. Guests check in with the innkeeper in the kitchen, and the down-home vibe continues with porch swings and hammocks. Or just grab one of the bikes and cycle along River Road for bucolic views across the river and unlimited opportunities for a pre-cocktail dip. Find more info here.

Left: The exterior of Nine River Road. Right: Inside the shop at Nine River Road. (Photos courtesy of Nine River Road)

7) Catskill Brewery, Livingston Manor

If a brewery can represent the future of this region, this is it. Apart from making expert hooch, the brewery’s state-of-the-art facility—which includes solar panels, natural day lighting, and green roofs—makes it among the greenest in the nation. Naturally, nearby resident and environmental activist Mark Ruffalo is a fan. Quench your thirst with a growler of Devil’s Path, an IPA named for a brutal Catskills trail. It’s so much easier to drink it than to hike it. Find more info here.

8) Beaverkill Bridge, Catskill Park

Hallowed in the annals of fly-fishing (the great sports writer Red Smith compared described being there for the opening day of the season as “a little like observing Christmas in Bethlehem”), Beaverkill is possibly the most famous trout stream in America. This spot, next to a 150-year-old covered bridge, is picnic nirvana. There are tables and grills along the river—and you can always fish for your supper. 792 Berrybrook Road Spur, Roscoe

iLoveMakonnen Just Dropped A New EP: Fun Summer Vol. 1

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Photo: @ilovemakonnen.vibes on Instagram

ILoveMakonnen just dropped a surprise 7-track EP called Fun Summer Vol. 1, so you don’t have to only listen to “Sign Of The Times” on repeat anymore.

Fun Summer Vol. 1 was announced over Instagram with the caption “New Vibes” – and it appears he’s really taking that concept to heart, since he deleted all of his previous posts and has his bio set as “NEW Makonnen.”

New Vibes Link in bio. Leave comment of which songs is favs.

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Makonnen also asked listeners to name their fave new song of the set in the comments, and upon scouring the reactions it seems “Dark Blue” and “Kiss For Me” are the early frontrunners for new summer jams, both songs about young love and parties.

Take a listen to the entire Fun Summer Vol. 1 below:


Makonnen most recently released last year’s Drink More Water 6:

He also did a duet in 2016 with Vampire Weekend’s Ezra Koenig:

Lana’s ‘Paris Match’ Photoshoot is the Definition of Glamour

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Photo: @LanaDelRey on Instagram

Lana Del Rey is really making the rounds of fashion spreads ahead of her forthcoming album, Lust For Life. She shut down the Internet this week with her incredible Flaunt shoot with David LaChapelle, looking like an ethereal phantom pageant princess, and she also graced the cover of Dazed serving some Old Hollywood majesty.

Now, she’s taking on French publication Paris Match, where she’s opted to go the route of gorgeous ’60s rich newlywed on her honeymoon tour of Europe’s salons. Here she is giving the bathroom mirror selfie to end all bathroom mirror selfies, while also managing to give some Yellow Wallpaper realness:

Paris Match

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Here, we see the singer framing her own face with the most Lana license plate holder we’ve ever seen:

Paris Match

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Here, she’s just being hot and patriotic, testing out the new Polaroid she got for her wedding:

Fun in the Sun w Paris Match!!!!!

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Lust For Life is out this soon, and promises to be the precious antidote to the crippling disease that has been 2017 so far.

Paramore Returns With New Video And Announcement of New Album

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It’s been four years since Paramore last released an album – last up was the 2013 self-titled LP that included the single “Ain’t It Fun.” Now, at last, the rock group is back, dropping a certified treasure trove of new material upon us today.

Not only have they released a music video for their single “Hard Times,” they’ve announced an entire new album, After Laughter, featuring the song as the first track. And, to really get us going this Wednesday morning, they’ve released the track list and album art. Take a look:

 

Track list:

01 Hard Times
02 Rose-Colored Boy
03 Told You So
04 Forgiveness
05 Fake Happy
06 26
07 Pool
08 Grudges
09 Caught In The Middle
10 Idle Worship
11 No Friend
12 Tell Me How

And album art:

paramorenewartafterlaughter